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  • ksanders
    replied
    Originally posted by Shovinoff View Post
    Just ordered an Atlantic towers arch. It means I could, and did, remove the stocker with a sawzall in light little pieces. The taller arch opens up the view to aft and no more bug and water trap. Ill post pix when complete.
    Yes, please post photos!

    I would really like to see how the project comes out!

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  • Shovinoff
    replied
    Just ordered an Atlantic towers arch. It means I could, and did, remove the stocker with a sawzall in light little pieces. The taller arch opens up the view to aft and no more bug and water trap. Ill post pix when complete.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    There's a pic of our aluminum arch on this site somewhere. If interested, email me and I'll send you a pic. I don't check in here very often.

    Molly

    [email protected]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm going to re-use the plastic trim. It's still in good shape. I plan on caulking it between the arch and only using a few screws and some tape to hold it in place until the caulk drys.

    StarBoard will be used for the panels and LEDs will replace the old light at the top of the arch. I'm not going to have lights in the sides of the arch anymore. We never used them and the cut out for the plastic lenses just created another area for water to intrude. If we find that more light is needed, I will install more water proof surface mount LEDs.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am about 90% complete on my 90 model 2655, arch rebuild. I am using 3/8" Starboard as an alternative to wood and fabric. Still (Over) thinking the final edge trim.

    http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...-on-radar-arch

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks Ken & Reed,

    I feel better about this now. My arch is solid. I think I will just need to replace the wood where the bolts go through and the wood around the edges. :-)

    Greg

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Apparently Bayliner didn't have a set way of building the arches. My arch has a foam core that has chopped glass over it on the inside. The only place there's any plywood is in the ends of the side pieces that bolt to the bridge. The wood around the edge that the panels screw to was #2 pine as was the blocking for the bolts.

    It doesn't surprise me that there isn't uniformity in the construction methods. When I was researching the rubber window track, I found that three different types were used on one window of my boat. Any one of the three types would have worked through out the entire job. They just used what they had on hand at the moment or what was closest to them at the time. It's part of the reason why they sell them as entry level boats.

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  • capnken
    replied
    Greg-

    read my post above.... the matt you see on the inside is covering the balsa core. The wood in the inside Bayliner used is a cheap plywood that was just glued in around the edges to screw into to attach the padded panels. You screwed into the end grain of the plywood. The matt was porous, so water usually intruded into this core.

    Ken

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Can someone post pictures of what the arch is supposed to look like on the inside? I purchased mine dissasemble with the wood removed, I think. Is the whole channel supposed to be filled with wood. Mine appears to be only fiberglass.

    Thanks,

    Greg

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Before you continue rebuilding & repairing your Bayliner Factory arches; consider a new aluminum arch from Atlantic Towers. They can be a great solution and you can get hinged versions. Advantages of Atlantic Towers Anodized aluminum aches over

    the OEM fiberglass arches:


    1. They will NEVER rot or crack
    2. They are lighter
    3. You can see through them so you have better visibility in your stern quarters
    4. They can be hinged to provide a MUCH lower air draft (14.5' on our 3818)
    5. They weigh much less than the OEM arches (less than 100 lbs)
    6. You can EASILY climb up on them to fix your radar & other antennaes
    7. They look better & give our boats an updated look without taking away from their classic lines







    I will post a few photos of our new arch tomorrow AM if I have time. In the meantime we are very happy with the Atlantic Towers solution which liberated us from the older arch & it's weaknesses

    Ken

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  • capnken
    replied
    I rebuilt my arch on my 4588, and can offer some info for you.

    First, when you remove the interior it appears you are looking at the inside of the arch... you are not...the way they built them, there is a balsa core under that spray in mat you see inside. Most of the arches people rebuild do not address this real issue... if your arch 'sags', you likely have water intrusion into this core.

    I made a jig for the arch to maintain it's port-stbd dimensions and support it, and lifted it off the boat with a travellift. when I got it home, I ground out the inner mat and literally scooped out the dead balsa core. I was left with a gelcoat outer shell about 4mm thick. I put it on the jig I made, and fiberglassed in 3/4" pressure treated plywood all around the edges, and created a nice rigid 'U' shaped shell. Next, I used a 7/16" marine grade plywood on the inside where the padded panels were and glassed that in, leaving a hollow arch completely enclosed. I then gelcoated and sanded, and shot the whole thing with a poly-urethane paint to match the boat, and cut 'pie' hole access on the inside at the base to allow thru-bolts access for re-attachment of the arch, and one access under the radar unit in the center. The entire arch was now a sealed unit keeping out any moisture. I have enclosed a picture of the arch on the boat... sorry I don't have any close-ups. Hope that helps. Good Luck!

    Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/659792=25061-SYS Projects 018.jpg[/img]

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  • Woodsong
    replied
    Well all may not be so bad. I have had so many items to dig into and only so much time so radar arch has not been high on my list. Good news is that I looked at further I realized the underside trim is starboard that is relatively new. It looks like they already recored it and the starboard trim is just loose in a few spots. It was blowing 25-30 mph today and not exactly warm out so will leave it for a warmer day.

    Good news is that I replaced the rusted up solenoid on the dinghy davit motor and got it working (also found out it must be hard wired b/c the davit power switch and the master 12V switch did NOT kill power to it!) and hooked up and tested the washer/dryer for the first time and it worked great too. Stripped the teak on the foredeck toerail yesterday (about 5-6 hours work) and will soon sand down the cockpit combing (no varnish there but it is greyed out) before I start putting on 8-10 coats of epiphanes. Even began scrubbing out under the engines today and new oil mats so I can see if we have any active leaks but after 45 hours of run time on them on the delivery trip home and no oil burn I think we are good to go on that front!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am also in the process of rebuilding the arch on my 3888. I had to replace all of the wood at the base where the bolts attach. For this I used pressure treated 2x4 tabbed in with fresh fiberglass. For the small 3/4" pieces that the panels attach to I used PVC material from the local Lowes store. As with most of the other submitters on this thread only the top 3/4" of the wood was rotted so I removed it with a router and am attaching the PVC material to the remaining wood with 3M 5200 and SS screws. I am using 1/2" Celtec plastic material to replace the panels and reupholstered with fresh naugahide and welting. I still have to paint and rewire before I re-install.

    Regarding removal versus fixing in place... it was a very simple process to remove. It took 4 of us about 45 minutes to disconnect and remove the arch. I will let you know how the reinstallation goes.

    Island Time 3888 Gloucester Point, VA

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am in the process of rebuilding my arch. (still) What I found is that the rot was only about 1/2--3/4 inches deep and mostly at the location of the screws that hold the panels on. The wood is close to 2" deep. A very easy fix would have been to just use longer screws that could grab into the solid wood below the rot.

    The other issue in my situation was that the panels were also rotten and needed to be replaced as well.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hello all we just rebuilt ours and did it in place. Ours was saving and had kind of upholstered nagahide on the outside. Saying or not it was ugly as sin. We paid a guy who was not a boat guy,... But very good with fiberglass to do the repair.

    He used right angle aluminum screwed to the existing wood. He then glassed it in, I think after cutting out some punky wood.

    For the outside finishing he used a plastic slightly off white material that has a bumpy finish, so does not look cheap or "plasticy" he used many closely spaced ss screws to suck the plastic in place.

    The result is better than I had hoped for and is very stiff. If anyone wants pictures please send me a note with an email adress and I will forward some pictures. I have never succeeded in learning how to post pictures here. I know "it is easy".........but I only this week learned how to send an attachment on an email.

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