Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

4788 pilothouse solar panel installation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    I believe Victron has a wireless battery temperature unit. Could save on wire routing.
    Lance O. Albany, OR
    1996 Ciera 2855 7.4 4bbl Bravo 3
    1978 21' Hawaiian 557 BBF Berkeley Jet (dingy)

    Comment


      #17
      There is no need for a battery temp probe for a solar panel installation.

      KEVIN SANDERS
      4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA - LA PAZ BCS MEXICO


      Whats the weather like on the boat
      https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


      Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

      Comment


        #18
        Both Victron controllers I've had a 20 amp PWM and now 30 amp MPPT both have temperature sensors, why do you say they're not necessary?

        James
        1989 Bayliner 3888, 175 Hinos,
        Hurth 630's Onan 8kw MDKD
        Lowrance Electronics!
        Boating on Georgian Bay & the North Channel
        Completed the Great Loop 07/25/19
        AGLCA #8340
        MTOA# 7469

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by MacPhid View Post
          Both Victron controllers I've had a 20 amp PWM and now 30 amp MPPT both have temperature sensors, why do you say they're not necessary?

          James
          The job of the temperature sensor is to limit charge current if the batteries get too hot, which happens from too much current.

          You are not going to get enough solar power to heat up your batteries. It is just not going to happen considering the space available on a boat and a reasonable sized house bank.

          Remember these are not marine specific systems. The solar industry is mostly land based systems that have the potential for much larger solar arrays.

          On a boat you are fortunate if you have enough solar capability to recharge youir house bank during the entire day, something your inverter/charger can do in just a couple of hours.

          KEVIN SANDERS
          4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA - LA PAZ BCS MEXICO


          Whats the weather like on the boat
          https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


          Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

          Comment


            #20
            Thanks, as i don't have an inverter. plus no plan to install one I understand about the temp sensor thanks. New question is the power monitor, if i put the shunt between the controller and the negative bus bar in the Electrical Panel will that give me a good reading as to Battery status?
            Charles Matthews
            Camelot 1998 4788
            Old Saybrook, CT

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by CAM39G550 View Post
              Thanks, as i don't have an inverter. plus no plan to install one I understand about the temp sensor thanks. New question is the power monitor, if i put the shunt between the controller and the negative bus bar in the Electrical Panel will that give me a good reading as to Battery status?
              the shunt has to be between the battery and any/all loads or charge sources. (At the battery negative post is best) If you put it between the charge controller and the negative buss you will not see the amp hours being put into your batteries from other sources I believe. I have the victron bvm 712. It is a blue tooth device and has optional temp sensor. It only requires one wire run from the battery to the display with a phone tube cord. Seamlessly networks to my victron mppt solar controller.
              Cool Change - 1999 4788
              330 Cummins
              Custom enclosed hardtop

              Comment


                #22
                Now that I have a little time with the system here is what I've found...

                With the four 175W panels I am not completely energy independent, meaning that at least in SOCAL there is not enough recharge during the day to make up for the energy used at night. I loose about 15% per day on my SOC meter. Of course this does not include things that are not DC or inverter based like the stove, or washer, etc...

                If you are connected to shore power the victron multi inverter/charger is in "pass through mode" meaning that AC loads that would run off of the inverter are powered by the shore power, not the batteries/solar system.

                This means that you are wasting part of your available solar energy. The only work around I have found is to trip the breaker feeding the inverter/charger in the morning, and to turn it on at night.

                This is not optimum, and I am looking for a better solution.

                KEVIN SANDERS
                4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA - LA PAZ BCS MEXICO


                Whats the weather like on the boat
                https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

                Comment


                • SteveK 1992 4588
                  SteveK 1992 4588 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  15% more to break even, does that mean that 4-200 watt panels would supply enough to break even. Or one more 175.

                • kwb
                  kwb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  My comments on the next post got me thinking about your shore power draw dilemma. Not sure if this would work but would be really easy to test. Adjust the amount you limit the draw from the dock down to 1-2amps then your inverter can be running your loads all day solar charging away and mostly holding the line and then the charger would self-limit to 20a or so. That would max your draw out from shorepower to about 6KWh per day with a 2A constant draw. Play with the max shorepower draw so that your SOC is pretty consistent day to day when weather patterns are consistent.

                  It would be pretty funny to see that size boat be able to run a 16ga shorepower cord.

                • ksanders
                  ksanders commented
                  Editing a comment
                  We think alike! I tried limiting the shore power and the lowest I can go down to is 15 amps

                #23
                We installed 3x SunPower 170 on brow and 3x160 on the extended bimini and find it is not quite enough to recharge every day, currently 15-20% per day usage. Maximum solar input I've seen is ~750watts at ~2pm. Impressive you could get four panels on your brow, no way with the SunPower. Currently working to find 'leakage'; turning off CPAP heater and unplugging during the day, spouse says ice-maker must stay on (working on that)! Stereo system appears to use a default 3-40 watts continuously on standby, need to figure out how to unplug as it's on our starboard outlets breaker. Also noticed our new Induction stove-top appears to consume significant standby power. I've noticed the alternators don't put much back into the house, probably because we cruise at 1300-1400 rpm, will have to review that.

                We did have an issue with the installation, the default method around here to install on Bimini is to use super-magnets, we had to double up the inside magnets and also add additional to the ends as it allowed the wind to get under the panels. The brow panels used 'glue-down' bolts which lasted only a few weeks on the highly stressed front edge, ended up drilling and screwing directly into the fibreglass, again with additional screws along leading edge.

                We also put the entire panel on Inverter, not just specific items. This means we have to manage specific breakers but I like this method, similar to what we had before with a smaller inverter. Plan is to eventually allow 'some' A/C for 'some' period of time. Inadvertently turned on 12k A/C and it started and ran fine on the inverter, only for 2-3 minutes however.

                What I've found a little frustrating is that when we're down on house battery and then go to a marina and plug in, the Victron 3000/12/120 automatically starts charging and if we're on twin 30amps it doesn't allow us to use many other heavy use items (i.e. A/C or oven) until it completes it's charge which can be 4+ hrs (we were at 50% yesterday).

                Overall happy with result, big learning curve.
                Graeme
                1999 Bayliner 4788, twin Cummins 330's
                Confirmed Aquaholic
                Newmarket, Ontario

                Comment


                • kwb
                  kwb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You must have an older version Victron I have the multi-plus with similar specs as your numbers. It will back off the charge automatically as other AC demands take priority and if my other AC loads are above an adjustable limit it will stop charging altogether and assist to prevent a trip on the shore power pedestal. The assist feature took some rewiring and wouldn't work with your strategy of being able to power anything on the panel with the inverter. The transfer switch built in is rated for 50A on mine but only 120V
                  If your unit can connect to a Cerbo GX and the Touch screen I highly recommend the addition.

                • SteveK 1992 4588
                  SteveK 1992 4588 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  The inverter charger does take priority in mine as well the way it is wired. That is something that will be changed as even on Gen, there is not enough power to cook until the charger drops from bulk.
                  Plan is to cook first and when done turn on the inverter charger.

                #24
                All of the above = my advice which now I find I did not heed. Always, always install as much wattage as you can find room for. The panels aren't that expensive. The sun is not always what you want it to be and unused space isn't giving you anything in return. I installed 2 300-watt panels thinking that was all I could fit over my half top. When my dock buddy asked about installing a system on his boat I gave that advice. He has less space overhead than I did but he installed 3 340-watt panels. The difference is that his hang out over the top of the bimini about 10 inches on each side. I didn't even consider doing so as I was worked the panels would come into contact with something while docked or rafted up. Well, I failed to take into account how much wider the beam of the boat is than the width of the half top. I may one day add a 3rd panel. For big boats its going to be hard to get 100% of power consumption because the bigger the boat the more load we tend to carry, multiple refrigerators, diesel heaters, running all kinds of stuff on the inverter (I actually have about 10 amps (maybe a slight exaggeration) drawn by my inverter having silly little things like Amazon Echos and phone chargers on it. Still, it's nice to tax the batteries and generator less than otherwise.
                Tony Bacon,
                Washougal, WA
                Caspian, MMSI 338355743
                1997 3788 Cummins 250hp

                Comment

                Working...
                X