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    Dipstick Markings & Oil Pressure

    A couple weeks ago I changed the oil in my hinos for the first time. Used a manual fluid extractor and finally figured out how to make it work using the braided hoses connected to the oil pan using quick connect fittings. Things got a little messy in the bilge with the filter change and I have some new stains on my hatch covers I need to deal with but anyway…

    Before the oil change my oil pressure under way was about 60 psi.

    I was able to remove between 1 and 1.5 gallons of oil per engine with the extractor before it started making that “bottom of the milkshake” sound and I couldn’t remove any more.

    Attaching a photo of my dipstick pre-oil change. Oil was up to the bottom of the indentation. Last oil change was about fifteen months ago. Sorry If image size is bonkers I’m uploading from my phone.

    Click image for larger version

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    I wound up adding 2 gallons of new oil (Shell Rotella—thanks to whoever I got that suggestion from) to each engine, realizing that it was more than I took out but thinking each engine was a little low to begin with.

    When I started engines post oil change they were both at 60 psi but when I pushed the throttle up to around 1K rpms in neutral oil pressure went up to around 70psi (still within safe operating parameters from the manual). Haven’t run engines or used the boat since, this was two weeks ago.

    Tonight I was at the marina doing chores and checked each dipstick cold to see where they read. Cold oil level read all the way to the top of the blade (the thin metal part that constitutes the whole end of the dipstick). It’s higher than the full indent but not higher than the end of the blade.

    I’ve read about the risks of too much oil in the pan, aeration, runaway diesels, and so on. My question is, am I on the full side but fine? Or am I overfilled and need to bust out the extractor and siphon a bit of fresh oil out of each engine or risk catastrophe on the water? Interested whether your dipsticks look like mine and where yours read and what you’re considering to be adequate, too low, too high, etc.

    Thanks!
    1994 Bayliner 3288 / 150 Hinos
    Pelican
    Elliot Bay Marina / Seattle, Washington

    #2
    Your pic shows the oil level at the low end of the “safe zone”. You added 2 additional quarts from what you had removed so I’d say your over by 1 quart. Personally I’d remove enough to bring the level back into the “safe zone”.
    Dave
    Edmonds, WA
    "THE FIX" '93 2556
    Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II
    The Rebuild Of My 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
    My Misc. Projects
    https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks, I'll pull a little out of each engine before my next trip and I should be good to go.

      It would be great if they marked the dipstick a little more clearly as to what is "safe" and "not safe." There are no markings on the dang thing at all except for the indentation.
      1994 Bayliner 3288 / 150 Hinos
      Pelican
      Elliot Bay Marina / Seattle, Washington

      Comment


        #4
        Dipstick was likely marked before the engines were installed so won't account for the angle the engine sits. It's only a guide. You should fill to the volume your manual states.
        1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

        Comment


        • jtreehorn
          jtreehorn commented
          Editing a comment
          When you say marked, do you mean with a scratch or some other mark I should be looking for? Or just with that "safe zone" indentation in the dip stick?

        • Mad Manc
          Mad Manc commented
          Editing a comment
          Adding to the volume stated assumes that all the oil was taken out, all the coolers and filters etc. drained. Too much oil can damage an engine. I doubt that the tilt of the engine affects the dipstick readings too much, they are typically at or near the center of the sump.

        #5
        Originally posted by jtreehorn View Post
        Thanks, I'll pull a little out of each engine before my next trip and I should be good to go.

        It would be great if they marked the dipstick a little more clearly as to what is "safe" and "not safe." There are no markings on the dang thing at all except for the indentation.
        The owner's manual for your engine will help guide you with the dipstick readings as well as the oil volumes. Similar to this one here:
        Hino4CylManual.pdf (bayliner32xx.com)
        Northport NY

        Comment


          #6
          This looks like the volume specified in the manual. It gives a range, not an exact amount. Two gallons of fresh could have brought me up near the top range given (2.37 US Gallons). Guessing the range is what you're aiming for with the "safe zone" markings on the stick? Might still be over.

          Click image for larger version

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          1994 Bayliner 3288 / 150 Hinos
          Pelican
          Elliot Bay Marina / Seattle, Washington

          Comment


            #7
            So the picture you've included shows the oil at the bottom of the safe zone. On my 4 cylinder Hino I would add close to 2 quarts to that, which would put the oil in the middle of the "narrow" part of the dipstick. I prefer it to be centered or a little more than centered.

            Comment


            • jtreehorn
              jtreehorn commented
              Editing a comment
              I'm definitely above that at the moment. Are you aiming for a center of narrow part when cold or warm (or does it matter)?

            #8
            jtreehorn - It doesn't matter but you certainly shouldn't be above the narrow part so you should suck a little out. The oil might settle a little bit after it's warm but whether I'm checking it after the engine has been running (after a few minutes of settling) or is cold the oil mark is the same. My port engine will go a 100 hours without hardly moving, maybe a fraction. My starboard engine on the other hand loses a quart every 30/40 hours and has for the last 5 years. Go figure.

            Comment


            • jtreehorn
              jtreehorn commented
              Editing a comment
              My starboard engine also seems to consume oil versus the port.

            #9
            ". . .risk catastrophe on the water. . . " Everytime we use our boats, we assume risk. I always attempt to keep the risk as low as I possibly can. I'm sure you do as well too.
            "Del-Sea"
            "98, 2859
            7.4 Mercruiser, B II
            Ferndale, WA. USA

            Comment


              #10
              Tonight I pulled two cold quarts of oil out of the port engine and one out of starboard to bring both dipsticks back to the safe zone. When I ran the engines to warm them up oil pressure looked normal. I think this concludes my oil change odyssey. FOR NOW.

              Port:

              Click image for larger version

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              Starboard:

              Click image for larger version

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              1994 Bayliner 3288 / 150 Hinos
              Pelican
              Elliot Bay Marina / Seattle, Washington

              Comment


              • Smitten
                Smitten commented
                Editing a comment
                There you go! They sure seem to be good little engines as long as they are fed and watered properly. :^)

              #11
              Originally posted by jtreehorn View Post
              Tonight I pulled two cold quarts of oil out of the port engine and one out of starboard to bring both dipsticks back to the safe zone. When I ran the engines to warm them up oil pressure looked normal. I think this concludes my oil change odyssey. FOR NOW.

              Port:

              Click image for larger version

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              Starboard:

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              When you did the original oil extraction - did you hook the extraction unit up to the oil pan drain hose at the bottom of the oil pan or did you send an oil extraction tube down the oil dipstick tube?
              Northport NY

              Comment


              • jtreehorn
                jtreehorn commented
                Editing a comment
                I started with an extraction tube down the dipstick tube initially, but when that was ineffective, I switched over the the oil pan drain hose (braided lines connected to the bottom of the oil pan).

              • smitty477
                smitty477 commented
                Editing a comment
                The dipstick currently appears as if there was some old oil left in the pan or filter - all diesel oil will quickly turn towards black but not usually this quickly after a full change.
                Perhaps you had left some in the system when changing oil and then adding the 2 gallons put you over the top.
                I have never owned the 4 cyl Hino (only the 6's) do these 150 hp series have the spin on oil filters or the cartridge filters?
                - do they have a separate centrifuge filter?
                - alternately do they have two spin on lube filters (full flow + bypass)?

              #12
              Just the single spin on oil filters, one per engine (if there is a second one I should have changed somebody holler at me!). Yeah, it was pretty black even after the change. I'm planning on changing oil again at the end of the season, well ahead of 100 engine hours, and will see if the next change is less black immediately after change. It seems like people say you can never get all the oil out because the engines aren't level sitting in the water, and I assumed the old dark oil made all the new oil look just as dark too.
              1994 Bayliner 3288 / 150 Hinos
              Pelican
              Elliot Bay Marina / Seattle, Washington

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