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    Anode Question

    Bringing our new 3888 to the lift next week for annual maintenance. It would save me a rushed trip to the chandlery if I could buy the anodes in advance. Can anyone give me an idea what I need?

    I know the shafts are 1.5 inch. I also know only two of the trim tabs have anodes installed right now, but I'm not sure why that would be. I couldn't be around for the survey, so this is secondhand knowledge.
    "Mariposa"
    1989 3888 Motor Yacht
    Twin Ford 351 Engines, Sidepower Thrusters
    Rendova 11' Tender
    Richmond, BC

    #2
    1.5" for the shafts are correct, I just buy a rudder anode set (two halves) for the trim tabs. I'm guessing because they are bonded together in the lazarette that only two tabs have them installed. I've not had to change the transom anode yet, as I recall it's an orphaned mount now, new ones have different mounting holes.

    James
    1989 Bayliner 3888, 175 Hinos,
    Hurth 630's Onan 8kw MDKD
    Lowrance Electronics!
    Boating on Georgian Bay & the North Channel
    Completed the Great Loop 07/25/19
    AGLCA #8340
    MTOA# 7469

    Comment


      #3
      A standard two slot brick will fit on two of the transom bolts just fine. There are companies that make a three slot, I found them by searching “Bayliner anodes”.
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      MMSI 367770440

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by MacPhid View Post
        1.5" for the shafts are correct, I just buy a rudder anode set (two halves) for the trim tabs. I'm guessing because they are bonded together in the lazarette that only two tabs have them installed. I've not had to change the transom anode yet, as I recall it's an orphaned mount now, new ones have different mounting holes.

        James
        We always bought the 'blank' 6 X 12 zincs and transferred the holes to the new blank zinc - they drill quite easily.
        Most often we went with a 3/4" or more thick plate as that would last multiple years before wearing significantly whereas the 1/2" zincs would typically only last one season.
        Clean all threads before putting on the new zinc and we used Superlube on the threads for quick attach and removal.
        Please use a thin wrench against the hull to hold the nut/shaft from turning when snugging up the outer nut.
        Northport NY

        Comment


          #5
          In the PNW, lots of us double up on the shaft zinc, two right next to each other. If you split rudder zinc for the tabs, use caution on the washers and bolts. If you have thrusters, each has a pair.
          You are in Richmond, which is likely fresh water. You need aluminum, not zinc, if you are going out into the Salish. Good luck. When they pull her out, ask how much she weighs, just for fun.
          Good luck
          Tally and Vicki
          "Wickus" Meridian 341
          MMSI 338014939

          Comment


          • purduepilot
            purduepilot commented
            Editing a comment
            My boat had double shaft anodes when I got it so I've kept it that way, but have wondered why... I also have shaft brushes that are bonded back to the main 6x12 anode.

          • Smitten
            Smitten commented
            Editing a comment
            Hi Talman - about half the time my shaft zincs are gone when we do the bi-yearly check. A friend claims his have been thrown into his prop. Do you think this double mounting helps this problem? Yes, I do tap them with a hammer and retighten and tap again. Thanks Smitten

          • talman
            talman commented
            Editing a comment
            I think that it helps. I also had issues keeping a single shaft zinc on for a year. That is a giant amount of bronze and SS out there. The battery that a little chunk of zinc and those shafts/props make in salt takes a big toll on the zinc. More zinc lasts longer, imho.

          #6
          Are there any zincs on the prop nuts?
          "Mariposa"
          1989 3888 Motor Yacht
          Twin Ford 351 Engines, Sidepower Thrusters
          Rendova 11' Tender
          Richmond, BC

          Comment


            #7
            No zinc's on the prop nuts on our 38.

            James
            1989 Bayliner 3888, 175 Hinos,
            Hurth 630's Onan 8kw MDKD
            Lowrance Electronics!
            Boating on Georgian Bay & the North Channel
            Completed the Great Loop 07/25/19
            AGLCA #8340
            MTOA# 7469

            Comment


              #8
              I dug up a few pictures taken at the time of inspection. There's a single disk shaped anode to the left of the transom thruster. Is that to replace the "brick" anode I've been hearing about, or is the brick somewhere else? Thanks!
              Click image for larger version

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              "Mariposa"
              1989 3888 Motor Yacht
              Twin Ford 351 Engines, Sidepower Thrusters
              Rendova 11' Tender
              Richmond, BC

              Comment


                #9
                I suspect that one replaced the brick. That one looks identical to the original trim tab anodes.
                Click image for larger version

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                James
                Last edited by MacPhid; 05-11-2022, 05:24 PM. Reason: Add transom photo
                1989 Bayliner 3888, 175 Hinos,
                Hurth 630's Onan 8kw MDKD
                Lowrance Electronics!
                Boating on Georgian Bay & the North Channel
                Completed the Great Loop 07/25/19
                AGLCA #8340
                MTOA# 7469

                Comment


                  #10
                  Just a suggestion... after installing the proper anodes, mask the anodes and paint shafts, props, rudders, and trim tabs with 'Prop Coat' or similar product. Your underwater metals will be better protected and the anodes will last much longer. I just followed the directions on the can. In my case the paint lasted 3+ years and the anodes lasted just shy of two years. Make sure all bonding wires are in good condition, clean all the connections too.

                  Greg
                  Newport, Oregon
                  South Beach Marina
                  1986 3270 with twin 110 HP Hino diesels. Name of boat "Mr. Darcy"
                  Past work history: Prototyping, tooling, and repair for Reinell,. General fiberglass boat repair starting in 1976.
                  Also worked as heavy equipment mechanic, and machinery mechanic for over 30 years.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Ok, so I stopped by my chandlery this past weekend to pick up some anodes, and I was looking for Aluminum because that's what I used on my last boat (Bravo 3, so usually just got a packaged set).

                    However the selection of loose Aluminum anodes was crap. I went to the counter to have them order the right ones in Aluminum, but the guy there ended up convincing me that Zinc was better anyway.

                    For the record, I'm on the Fraser river which feeds into the ocean. It's generally considered brackish, although I haven't exactly tested the salt content myself. There's a beaver living next door to my boat, if that tells you anything.

                    I'm having second thoughts about putting these Zinc anodes on my boat, because there's a lot of conflicting opinions out there. Some say Zinc is the worst anode of all, some not. Some say Zinc develops a coating, and some say Aluminum does.

                    I change anodes every year anyway. Does it even matter what I use?
                    "Mariposa"
                    1989 3888 Motor Yacht
                    Twin Ford 351 Engines, Sidepower Thrusters
                    Rendova 11' Tender
                    Richmond, BC

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Squid,

                      If you look at the photo of our transom you'll see the rectangular zinc. It is the original factory installed anode, 30 + years. Zinc in fresh water lasts forever, probably provides little protection. Our trim tab anodes were original as well, only had to change them after we completed the loop Its first taste of salt water
                      Beavers like fresh water as far as I know. If you go out to salt water on a regular basis I would go with your original thought and install aluminum anodes

                      James
                      1989 Bayliner 3888, 175 Hinos,
                      Hurth 630's Onan 8kw MDKD
                      Lowrance Electronics!
                      Boating on Georgian Bay & the North Channel
                      Completed the Great Loop 07/25/19
                      AGLCA #8340
                      MTOA# 7469

                      Comment


                        #13
                        The tide floods the river for miles. Zinc is fine. I've never used shaft zincs. I mentioned the factory didn't use shaft zincs but someone claims his came with them. Maybe, or maybe a dealer add-on. I use a 3/4" 6x12 zinc and two round 4" zincs sandwiched to the trim tabs.
                        1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

                        Comment


                          #14
                          We're on Lake Union and intend to spend 20-50 days per year in the salt. We use aluminum.
                          Brad
                          Lake Union, Seattle
                          1987 Bayliner 4550 "Ark Angel"
                          Hino EH700T / MG-502 / Cummins Onan 7kw
                          Seattle Yacht Club

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Originally posted by Squidward View Post
                            Ok, so I stopped by my chandlery this past weekend to pick up some anodes, and I was looking for Aluminum because that's what I used on my last boat (Bravo 3, so usually just got a packaged set).

                            However the selection of loose Aluminum anodes was crap. I went to the counter to have them order the right ones in Aluminum, but the guy there ended up convincing me that Zinc was better anyway.

                            For the record, I'm on the Fraser river which feeds into the ocean. It's generally considered brackish, although I haven't exactly tested the salt content myself. There's a beaver living next door to my boat, if that tells you anything.

                            I'm having second thoughts about putting these Zinc anodes on my boat, because there's a lot of conflicting opinions out there. Some say Zinc is the worst anode of all, some not. Some say Zinc develops a coating, and some say Aluminum does.

                            I change anodes every year anyway. Does it even matter what I use?
                            This was a lesson I went through also when I changed anodes not long ago. I am no expert but I do believe the difference matters. I think part of what adds to the confusion is that boaters over time have been calling anodes "zincs" just generically. So zinc became ingrained in our thinking. There is good information out there about what each type of anode is best for. Aluminum is my preference for salt water.
                            1990 Bayliner 3288
                            1984 MacGregor 21
                            1969 Lido 14
                            1990 MacGregor 26X Sold
                            1978 Catalina 22 Sold
                            Every type of whitewater craft made

                            Comment

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