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4788 boat deck rail and skiff positioning-gctid352749

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    4788 boat deck rail and skiff positioning-gctid352749

    We purchased a Zodiac YL340 tender for our 4788.With the chocks in the "factory stock" position the skiff hangs over the port side further than I like, and it also hangs over the cockpit more than I'm comfortable with.This creates a situation where the davit cannot be put into the "down" position.We're going to re-position the skiff inboard so that there is some clearance between the ourboard side of the skiff and the edge of the boat deck. This will allow the davit to be put "down" and tensioned against the ring as was intended by the factory.Moving the skiff puts it just about right at the edge of the flybridge-cockpit access, requiring removal or serious modification to the rail system, both on the aft section of the boat deck and the cockpit-flybridge access.My first take is to remove this railing completely and fill in the screw holes (I would leave the starboard side railing you can see in the photos). Same thing with the boat deck port side railing. Its down all the time to get ther skiff on and off the boat anyway, so why have it there?What do you guys think?Also, on the davit, is there a "down" position where where you can put the pin back in place?Here's some photos of how we want to position the skiff.Thanks!

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/655599=24802-skiff 1.jpg[/img]

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/655599=24803-skiff 2.jpg[/img]

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    www.transferswitch4less.com

    where are we right now?

    https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

    #2
    Here's some photos of what I think is smitty477's boat without the rails.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/655614=24804-4788 no rail 1.jpg[/img]

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/655614=24805-4788 no rail 2.jpg[/img]Smitty477, if this is your boat, did you just fill in the holes with resin?

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    www.transferswitch4less.com

    where are we right now?

    https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

    Comment


      #3
      Hi Kevin,

      I don't know if there was a "factory stock" position for dinghy chocks on the bridge. Everyone seems to have different types of chocks as well as different styles and sizes of dinghies. We have a large dinghy and have it positioned similar to what you show in your photos. It is mounted on four weaver chocks. We have removed the railing completely on the port side of the flybridge/cockpit access to allow it to fit (we also have a similar sliding hatch to cover the access when not in use, which is great as it can be walked on and you don't have to worry about falling down the well into the cockpit). We still have the railing on the starboard side. We filled the screw holes with white MarineTex epoxy. We also leave off the rail posts and lines on the port side and aft of the dinghy.

      We always store our davit in the horizontal position - otherwise the rods in the gas springs quickly corrode and become permanently stuck in the up position. I find that if you swing the davit out about 60 degrees from it's stored position you can get the pin in and out.

      Cheers,
      Mike
      "Allante I" Rayburn 75
      Previous: '97 4788

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Kevin,

        "Smitty477, if this is your boat, did you just fill in the holes with resin?"

        Yes - that is our boat. We have taken the rail down just as you say. Then we cut starboard a bit larger then the railing flanges and used the railing as a template (each is different) to drill them for the original fasteners, We camphered the tops of the starboard with a belt sander and installled them with a good but removable sealant. The dinghy chocks are not standard on any of the boats we have seen and we made ours out of alaskan cedar placed at a stlight anlge fore and aft cheated over to the stb side. The rear most cross member was designed to be almost on top of the verticle bulkhead below which makes up the rear salon wall. The dinghy you see in the photo's is a Zodiac YL-380 with a 40 yamaha.

        Here is another picture which may help you see some additional detail and positioning.....

        http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b7...D550/ry%3D400/

        Hope this helps
        Northport NY

        Comment


          #5
          Here is one mostly from the side - same Zodiac....

          http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8...D720/ry%3D480/
          Northport NY

          Comment


            #6
            The teak chocks that came with our 1996 47 were never installed by the factory when we bought the boat new. We installed Weaver chocks. We had to remove the railing on both sides and rear of dingy.
            Started boating 1965
            Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks guys!

              I'm going to do as others have done and completely remove the railing that is in the way.

              That will provide a clean look to the boat, and make getting the skiff on and off easier.

              KEVIN SANDERS
              4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
              www.transferswitch4less.com

              where are we right now?

              https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

              Comment


                #8
                On the M490's the only rail installed at the factory was the one near the hatch above the ladder. We also have the YL340 tender, which sits tight to the rail. In this position, it is still possible to lower the davit boom and pin it in the travel position, but it is awkward.

                When we first purchased the boat, I switched the locking pin and tether so that it fitted from the outside, otherwise the boom has to be swung very wide for clearance. After a few deployments and recoveries of the dinghy, I started to leave the boom in the up position, and while this might be detrimental to the condition of the gas struts in the long term, I honestly can't remember the last time it was lowered. I think most owners probably do it this way.

                On the subject of chocks, we have the Weaver units which have base plates bolted to the boat deck, and the chocks themselves slide and lock into the plates. This means that in a few seconds, the chocks can be removed and stored after dinghy deployment, thus avoiding very painful (and dangerous) stubbing of your toes. You indicated concern with the overhang of the dighy at the stern - the way that our lifting bridle is configured, we have to push the dinghy slightly sternward to avoid contact between the outboard and the cockpit cover.

                Back to the rails, it has occurred to us on several occasions that having no perimeter rails could be hazardous with a potential falling problem for youngsters..............
                Rob
                Bayliner 5788
                'Merlin V'
                Vancouver BC

                Comment


                  #9
                  Merlin4087 wrote:


                  Back to the rails, it has occurred to us on several occasions that having no perimeter rails could be hazardous with a potential falling problem for youngsters..............
                  Unless the kids are extremely small, to point they need oversight, those rails are too low to help much, more of a tripping hazard IMHO.
                  Started boating 1965
                  Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                  Comment


                    #10
                    +1 with Merlin. In three years we have never lower the davit ( tried it once but never again). Think emergency situation, one more time consuming step to go thru. But we never travel with the hook attach to the lifting bridle. Always attached to it's D-Ring. Heard stories of where the dinghy attached to the upright davit in rough seas with tiedowns failing became a damage causing pendulum. Ted

                    Comment


                      #11
                      FWIW - we do not like to travel in rough seas with the davit 'up', it does not seem safe as it moves around much more.

                      If it is not moving around as much perhaps it is because the bearing is somewhat siezed and if so it will get sworsse over time and/or with hot weather.

                      With the chocks slightly offset in the fore/aft centerline favoring stb forward (aft port) as well as offset slighty to stb you will likely experience no access problems to the davit or the boat deck ladder.

                      Hope this helps
                      Northport NY

                      Comment


                        #12
                        We have never lowered the davit since our 47 was new. We keep the cable snug attached to the dingy harness. We have the front and back of dingy tied to 47 with quick release knots that can be released from inside the dingy. We see the dingy as a poor mans life raft.
                        Started boating 1965
                        Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Hello mmichellich,

                          "We have never lowered the davit since our 47 was new. We keep the cable snug attached to the dingy harness. We have the front and back of dingy tied to 47 with quick release knots that can be released from inside the dingy. We see the dingy as a poor mans life raft."

                          We actually feel the exact same way as you do.

                          FWIW - Our dinghy lift sling is made of a cable which cannot be easily cut. We also are concerned that the davit 'up' would be in the way/dangerous if we had to board the dinghy on the boat deck or cut it clear from the boat deck in the case of an abrupt sinking.

                          We are also concerned that in an emergency situation the power to the davit coudl easily be unavailable.

                          So we have the dinghy secured with strong poly staps holding down which can be cut - davit is stored down. And we figure that deployment in a 'disaster' that requires fast work might 'normally' include lack of power, poor seas, a launch off the boat deck, and maybe a 'free' launch of dinghy off of the boat deck.

                          Our ditch bag hanging at the back door includes a good dive knife with partial scabbard that will allow the cuts along with the handheld, flares, and other gear.

                          Just another view of the worst case scenario we are all working hard to avoid.

                          Hope this helps
                          Northport NY

                          Comment


                            #14
                            smitty477 wrote:
                            Hello mmichellich,

                            "We have never lowered the davit since our 47 was new. We keep the cable snug attached to the dingy harness. We have the front and back of dingy tied to 47 with quick release knots that can be released from inside the dingy. We see the dingy as a poor mans life raft."

                            We actually feel the exact same way as you do.

                            FWIW - Our dinghy lift sling is made of a cable which cannot be easily cut. We also are concerned that the davit 'up' would be in the way/dangerous if we had to board the dinghy on the boat deck or cut it clear from the boat deck in the case of an abrupt sinking.

                            We are also concerned that in an emergency situation the power to the davit coudl easily be unavailable.

                            So we have the dinghy secured with strong poly staps holding down which can be cut - davit is stored down. And we figure that deployment in a 'disaster' that requires fast work might 'normally' include lack of power, poor seas, a launch off the boat deck, and maybe a 'free' launch of dinghy off of the boat deck.

                            Our ditch bag hanging at the back door includes a good dive knife with partial scabbard that will allow the cuts along with the handheld, flares, and other gear.

                            Just another view of the worst case scenario we are all working hard to avoid.

                            Hope this helps
                            I keep two very sharp fillet knives in our Bullfrog. Our lift harness for the dingy is made of that new extra strong line that is replacing cable in a lot of applications. I have cut it before with a sharp knife. I also have wire cutters in the Bullfrog to handle a downrigger emergency, so we should be covered. The dingy has an excellent emergency kit containing 3 life jackets, robust flare kit, a good first aid kit, a portable VHF, a fixed VHF, GPS, depth sounder, emergency foil blankets, ponchos, emergency fuel, six pack of beer, signaling mirror, whistles, a bit of energy snacks, plus more. Just read about a guy in Az that survived for two weeks on a six pack of beer.
                            Started boating 1965
                            Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                            Comment


                              #15
                              "I keep two very sharp fillet knives in our Bullfrog. Our lift harness for the dingy is made of that new extra strong line that is replacing cable in a lot of applications. I have cut it before with a sharp knife. I also have wire cutters in the Bullfrog to handle a downrigger emergency, so we should be covered. The dingy has an excellent emergency kit containing 3 life jackets, robust flare kit, a good first aid kit, a portable VHF, a fixed VHF, GPS, depth sounder, emergency foil blankets, ponchos, emergency fuel, six pack of beer, signaling mirror, whistles, a bit of energy snacks, plus more. Just read about a guy in Az that survived for two weeks on a six pack of beer"

                              Excellent point - we need to add a six pack!
                              Northport NY

                              Comment

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