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Anchor Gypsy Woes-gctid352165

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    Anchor Gypsy Woes-gctid352165

    So this is more or less a funny, at my own expense.

    Started when I realized that as my anchor chain was coming up and running through the gypsy, it was not being stripped off the wheel fast enough. That allowed it to try and bunch down between the gypsy, the collar of the chain locker cover and the deck. I had to watch it very closely to make sure I didn't end up with a boogered up mess. The problem stems from the hole to the locker being placed slightly aft of where it should be. Even with a stainless stripper in place, it left just enough room for bad things to happen.

    The problem pre dated my owning the boat, as I noticed the previous owner had made a little plastic piece designed to try and take up the gap and prevent the chain from double wrapping itself on the gypsy. On my particular boat, the stainless stripper was bolted to the base of the windless with two 5/16 bolts, that ran through the stripper, a couple spacers, and into the windless.

    AS luck would have it, the history of the chain getting bound up gradually weakened those bolts and a week or so ago, one snapped off. that allowed the chain to really cludge things up; bent the stainless stripper and the other bolt and locked up tight.

    I ended up pulling the gypsy off and banging things around and got the chain off. So that left me with a snapped off bolt.

    Now a smart boy would have pulled the whole windless, taken it to the shop and done the job right. But since I ain't that smart boy, I figured I'd do it in place. So drill drill drill...have a nice hole in the middle of the broken bolt and start with an easy out. Man that thing is in there. So, not wanting to break off the easy out, I start drilling out the hole bigger, to help relax the threads and to be able to use a bigger easy out. AS I finish drilling and start pulling the bit out of the hole, I shift my weight and snap... Oh man, now I've broken a bit off down in the hole. I can see the damn thing and actually wiggle it with a small pick, but can't get it out.

    So back to being the smart boy who would have taken it to the shop. I'm still not him and as luck would have it, I managed to grab the little hunk of bit with a set of very fine tweezers and out it came. Hot dog I'm in business.

    So now its back to using a bigger easy out. Try as I might, I can't break that bolt loose. So, instead of being a smart boy, I reef on it just one more time, and snap...broken easy out.

    So now I'm really screwed.

    But the good news is that I'm changing plans. I really don't like how that little stainless stripper works. It really doesn't do a very good job (obviously) so even if I get it all put back together, I still don't have what I want.

    So I went by a plastics supply place and picked up a big hunk of tough, uv resistent plastic.

    Stopped at the boat again and since I'm STILL not smart enough to pull the windless, made a bunch of measurements and tomorrow I'll spend the day on the milling machine, making a stripper that works the way I want it to.

    I've got about a zillion hours in this thing so far... a quarter the number I'd have if I did it right the first time. But damn it...I have principles... Once I make a mistake, I'll keep compounding it until the law of averages swings back in my favor. Which could happen any day now.

    https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...787049984-1&zw

    That's how it looks with the stripper in place to do its job.

    https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&i...776544768-1&zw

    and here's mine after the bolt broke and bent the stripper and shoved it down to the deck.

    #2
    the 16 by 16 pixel images are hard to see ! but your methods sound vaguely familiar.

    Comment


      #3
      Once I make a mistake, I'll keep compounding it until the law of averages swings back in my favor.

      If those aren't words to live by, I don't know what are!

      Comment


        #4
        "It seems we never have enough time to do things right, but enough time to do it over again!" :hammer(no criticism intended, purely intended to be humorous). I removed my windlass to powdercoat the casing (much easier to work on the bench). If you have the Muir Cougar, go to Imtra.com. They are in Mass. somewhere, and their website has the owners manual with detailed schematics for all sorts of disassembly. They are very responsive and I have ordered parts from them direct. Good luck!

        Jack

        Comment


          #5
          I have had that problem on two Bayliners (38 and 47). In each case it seemed to be caused by the pile of chain in the chain locker too tall, which minimized the weight on the chain coming off and down through the deck, allowing a total jam at the deck. One time the jam completely stripped the gears in the windless because I had the clutch too tight. When the pile of chain in the chain locker is flatter everything seems to work well. I messed with the chain stripper several times over several years and it did not solve the problem. The only time this comes up is if I use a couple hundred feet of chain. Now when I do this, I bring up about half, then knock down the peaked pile of chain in the chain locker and all is well.
          Started boating 1965
          Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

          Comment


            #6
            Spent some time working on my new solution today....and abandoned it. Drank a couple beers instead. I'm probably going to pull the windlass tomorrow, but will need to do it after dark so none of my neighbors see me doing it and laugh even more then they have so far. I'll bet that thing is gonna be heavy. Sure hope I don't drop it in the drink.

            Comment


              #7
              I replaced the chain pipe on my 38 with on from Imtra that is designed to use on the cougar windlass. I've had no problems since. I'ld post a pic but haven't figured how to with my iPhone. It has a pick that brings the chain off the wheel so it drops thru the pipe. If I remember right it isn't shown on imtra's web site, I called and talked with a rep that recommended the part.
              Capt. Ron.
              "I will not tiptoe through life to arrive safely at death"
              "Never Trade Luck For Skill"
              1987 3870 - Northern Lights ll
              Hino EH700
              Westerbeke 8.0
              1999 Logic Marine 17' CC/50 Merc.
              on Louisiana pool Mississippi River.

              Comment


                #8
                capt. ron wrote:
                I replaced the chain pipe on my 38 with on from Imtra that is designed to use on the cougar windlass. I've had no problems since. I'ld post a pic but haven't figured how to with my iPhone. It has a pick that brings the chain off the wheel so it drops thru the pipe. If I remember right it isn't shown on imtra's web site, I called and talked with a rep that recommended the part.
                The "Pick" as you call it, is what first got boogered up and started my magical mystery tour of windlass exploration. My latest "new design" will incorporate a "pick" and what will essentially be a pad that the chain rides down to the opening into the chain locker.

                How far does your chain pipe extend, both above and below deck?

                Comment


                  #9
                  I glassed a piece of PVC into the original hole that was as long as the deck is thick. I have 300' of chain & have had no problems but have only had it since last spring. The chain pipe I got from does extend above the deck & as stout as it's built & designed I don't see how it could get mangled if installed right. Good Luck
                  Capt. Ron.
                  "I will not tiptoe through life to arrive safely at death"
                  "Never Trade Luck For Skill"
                  1987 3870 - Northern Lights ll
                  Hino EH700
                  Westerbeke 8.0
                  1999 Logic Marine 17' CC/50 Merc.
                  on Louisiana pool Mississippi River.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks Ron. Good thoughts. I replied privately as well, and look forward to the picture.

                    toni

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I sent the pic, if I was building one the only thing I would do different is make the base plate larger and add a couple more mounting bolts. But that is what happens when welders or mechanics design something & not engineers.
                      Capt. Ron.
                      "I will not tiptoe through life to arrive safely at death"
                      "Never Trade Luck For Skill"
                      1987 3870 - Northern Lights ll
                      Hino EH700
                      Westerbeke 8.0
                      1999 Logic Marine 17' CC/50 Merc.
                      on Louisiana pool Mississippi River.

                      Comment

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