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    Upper Deck - Tender Tie Down

    Being new to the upper deck storage game I am still experimenting.

    So far I am using a combination of ratchet straps and lines. - It is slow and clunky to connect to the cradle. I have a SS tube cradle the boat sits on so not quite the same as the chock blocks I have seen on other boats but I have never paid much attention to how the boat was secured down. On all of my swim step arrangements I have used I was able to get away with a line or two but failure mode there was the dink fell off the step and was adrift. From the upper deck it could do some real damage on the way down.

    I would like to make it more fool proof so I can turn the boy (12) loose at the job and I just need to do a quick visual before we go. The flip side is we are often going to have to deploy before we tie the boat up so I want to be able to launch it while adrift outside of a marina quickly.

    I am not sure if there are any cam over type things I might be able to use on short amsteel or flat straps to clip in and cinch down quickly and have it be solidly attached. I have a couple ideas on making the cover a lot quicker but the need to secure it isn't quite as critical as the boat to the boat connection.
    1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
    1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
    Nobody gets out alive.

    #2
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ID:	584075 Our 12.5 AB with 25 hp outboard sits on Weaver type chocks. One could easily attach a couple of ratchet SS Ratchet type tie downs. I haven't used anything but that forward "eye" on deck to bow eye of the AB RIB. This has worked quite well for us as it has never shifted over many years of cruising in all kinds of seas from flat seas to " you could hide a Dump Truck in here".
    Brad & Sharon
    Lady Jake
    1985 4550 EH 700TI /Twin Disc 502
    LaConner,Wa. (summer)
    2003 Scout CC 24' W/225 Yamaha
    kailua Kona,Hi (Winter)

    Comment


      #3
      I use these for my tender. cross tied from stand to stand, works very well.

      https://www.fisheriessupply.com/gato...m-tie-down-2in
      Patrick and Patti
      4588 Pilothouse 1991
      12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
      M/V "Paloma"
      MMSI # 338142921

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Papa_Charlie View Post
        I use these for my tender. cross tied from stand to stand, works very well.

        https://www.fisheriessupply.com/gato...m-tie-down-2in
        We used the same as Papa Charlie - 2 on each end splayed or crossed.... Click image for larger version

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        Northport NY

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          #5
          Sometimes we had the jet ski and other times we had the 12.5' RIB up there, same straps:

          Click image for larger version

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          Northport NY

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            #6
            The only difference is I don't secure the aft of the boat, I just run a single strap across the tender from the port to the stbd forward stands. We have our cockpit enclosed so hard to access the stern.

            Patrick and Patti
            4588 Pilothouse 1991
            12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
            M/V "Paloma"
            MMSI # 338142921

            Comment


              #7
              On my 4788 I used SS ratchet straps. The forward end of all three straps secured to a padeye located on deck under the bows. The ratchets devices for all 3 were in this location. One short strap ran vertically up to the bow padeye on the dinghy. The other 2 ran to the back of the upperdeck, through padeyes, crossed in an X and then attached to two padeyes on the transom of the Rendova RIB.

              To deploy I would;
              1. loosen all 3 ratchets at the bows and unhook the bow strap from the dinghy
              2. Walk along the 4788 Stern bulkhead from which I could reach the hooks on the dinghy transom. Unhook those and then we were ready to hoist.

              The only thing I did not enjoy was getting down on the deck to ratchet/unratchet the straps - not a problem for a 12 year old! But is was quick. The straps would remain on the aft upper deck loose but ready to be reattached.
              Alan Teed
              MOONSHADOW
              '96 Wendon Sky Lounge
              Gig Harbor, WA
              Previously:
              1994 Bayliner 4788
              2006 Hylas 49' Sailboat
              Bayliner 2855
              1977 Cal 34' Sailboat
              1981 Hunter 33' Sailboat
              Experience: Sail 50 years, Motor 15 years. 2 Transats, 1 Baltimore-Virgin Islands, 6 Months cruising Caribbean, 3.5 years cruising Med.

              Comment


                #8
                I don't like having too many anchors holding the tender down. It really isn't necessary and can make it more difficult in an emergency to free the tender from the boat. One strap that has the release handy without having to crawl to the edge of the upper deck permits ease of releasing the tender in normal and emergency situations.

                You may not be able to launch the tender in a normal fashion in an emergency. Electrics may be gone in the case of a boat starting to sink. I can easily release the tender and, at least in theory, the tender will float free from the boat as it sinks. Most larger boats don't roll on sinking so the theory is sound and provides a rescue platform.

                I also have a ditch bag that is kept close to the exit points on the boat so it is easy to grab. That ditch bag contains a hand held VHF radio with DSC. I have one MMSI for the main vessel and a second one registered to the tender. If all goes south, I will activate the boats DSC and should I have to abandon the boat, I can activate the DSC on the hand held to notify the CG that I have had to leave the boat and now in the tender. All without speaking to a single individual.

                They may sound like overkill, but think of it this way. Here in the PNW you have about 15-30 minutes in the water before hypothermia sets in. Even though the Puget Sound is a confined water way, there are many issues that can arise to cause you to abandon the boat. Swimming to shore in most cases won't be a short swim and you are going to be fighting some serious currents.

                How many of you carry a real life raft? I don't so my tender servers double duty.

                I spent a lot of years working on the water in San Francisco Bay and the surrounding coast down to Morro Bay, my team has had to rescue more than a few recreational boaters. This has caused me to look at things a little different.
                Patrick and Patti
                4588 Pilothouse 1991
                12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
                M/V "Paloma"
                MMSI # 338142921

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Papa_Charlie View Post
                  I don't like having too many anchors holding the tender down. It really isn't necessary and can make it more difficult in an emergency to free the tender from the boat. One strap that has the release handy without having to crawl to the edge of the upper deck permits ease of releasing the tender in normal and emergency situations.

                  You may not be able to launch the tender in a normal fashion in an emergency. Electrics may be gone in the case of a boat starting to sink. I can easily release the tender and, at least in theory, the tender will float free from the boat as it sinks. Most larger boats don't roll on sinking so the theory is sound and provides a rescue platform.

                  I also have a ditch bag that is kept close to the exit points on the boat so it is easy to grab. That ditch bag contains a hand held VHF radio with DSC. I have one MMSI for the main vessel and a second one registered to the tender. If all goes south, I will activate the boats DSC and should I have to abandon the boat, I can activate the DSC on the hand held to notify the CG that I have had to leave the boat and now in the tender. All without speaking to a single individual.

                  They may sound like overkill, but think of it this way. Here in the PNW you have about 15-30 minutes in the water before hypothermia sets in. Even though the Puget Sound is a confined water way, there are many issues that can arise to cause you to abandon the boat. Swimming to shore in most cases won't be a short swim and you are going to be fighting some serious currents.

                  How many of you carry a real life raft? I don't so my tender servers double duty.

                  I spent a lot of years working on the water in San Francisco Bay and the surrounding coast down to Morro Bay, my team has had to rescue more than a few recreational boaters. This has caused me to look at things a little different.
                  "I don't like having too many anchors holding the tender down. It really isn't necessary and can make it more difficult in an emergency to free the tender from the boat. One strap that has the release handy without having to crawl to the edge of the upper deck permits ease of releasing the tender in normal and emergency situations"
                  FWIW - where we are the likelihood of the tender coming loose in heavy seas and/or a boat fire are higher than a 'quick' sinking event even though all of these are very small %'s.

                  "How many of you carry a real life raft? I don't so my tender servers double duty."
                  We also tow a larger RIB behind the boat, when we did any offshore cruising we had a life raft as well. In inshore areas the raft is/was not really necessary.
                  Northport NY

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Smitty,
                    Everyone has to make plans that fit to the area they are boating. More often as not, if we are planning any distance up into the islands here in the Puget Sound, I will launch the tender and tow it like you. Otherwise it is on the upper deck and plan is to release as described.

                    If I were to plan any coastal trips, I would most probably either rent or purchase a self deploying life raft and probably survival suites for each person aboard if this is an extended trip.

                    For certified vessels, the latter requires some training and practice as by USCG standards you are to be able to dawn the suite in 60 seconds. Not easy if you haven't done it, harder if you are wet or in the water, which I have had to train on many years ago. Doubt I would come even close to the time these days.
                    Patrick and Patti
                    4588 Pilothouse 1991
                    12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
                    M/V "Paloma"
                    MMSI # 338142921

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Click image for larger version

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                      Originally posted by Papa_Charlie View Post
                      Smitty,
                      Everyone has to make plans that fit to the area they are boating. More often as not, if we are planning any distance up into the islands here in the Puget Sound, I will launch the tender and tow it like you. Otherwise it is on the upper deck and plan is to release as described.

                      If I were to plan any coastal trips, I would most probably either rent or purchase a self deploying life raft and probably survival suites for each person aboard if this is an extended trip.

                      For certified vessels, the latter requires some training and practice as by USCG standards you are to be able to dawn the suite in 60 seconds. Not easy if you haven't done it, harder if you are wet or in the water, which I have had to train on many years ago. Doubt I would come even close to the time these days.
                      Hello Pat - I agree with equipping the boat for the purpose. We stopped traveling offshore many years back and skipped the survival equipment ever since and never missed it.
                      "I will launch the tender and tow it like you. Otherwise it is on the upper deck and plan is to release as described."
                      FWIW - we often had 3 inflatables with us but almost always two at any time.
                      In the picture posted above you can see the 12.5' RIB on the top deck and in the other picture the 19' RIB tied the side of the boat. With the 19' in two and the 12.5' on the boat deck we also typically had a 9'-10' inflatable tipped up on the swimstep as well.
                      Northport NY

                      Comment


                        #12
                        We use three ratchet straps. One at the bow two at the stern. All tie down points are thru bolted. We keep the ratchet straps permanently attached at the stern. The bow strap is stowed when not in use and is easily connected. The ratchets are autozone type, nothing special. I keep them coated with corrosion resistant coating. They are doing ok going on 5 years. You can see them in the pic. Holds the dinghy well thru some pretty rough SF bay chop and 12-14’ Maytag seas coming up the west coast In 18. We do carry a life raft but the dinghy is part of our ditch plan as long as we have power. We keep the crane attached with slight cable tension as shown. I can launch the the dinghy by myself in less than 5 minutes in calm water.





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                        2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
                        12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
                        MV Kia Orana
                        Currently Enjoying the PNW

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by smitty477 View Post
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                          Hello Pat - I agree with equipping the boat for the purpose. We stopped traveling offshore many years back and skipped the survival equipment ever since and never missed it.
                          "I will launch the tender and tow it like you. Otherwise it is on the upper deck and plan is to release as described."
                          FWIW - we often had 3 inflatables with us but almost always two at any time.
                          In the picture posted above you can see the 12.5' RIB on the top deck and in the other picture the 19' RIB tied the side of the boat. With the 19' in two and the 12.5' on the boat deck we also typically had a 9'-10' inflatable tipped up on the swimstep as well.
                          Smitty,
                          You are well set up well with your configuration, from the pictures and posts over the years. I wish more people would realize how fast things can go south and how little advantage there is to having land in sight, unless you are within a few yards of it.
                          I see boaters all the time in little boats in the sound with no preservers on, not even an inflatable vest. We here of too many that don't end well.
                          Hope you have a great Memorial Day. Take care.
                          Patrick
                          Patrick and Patti
                          4588 Pilothouse 1991
                          12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
                          M/V "Paloma"
                          MMSI # 338142921

                          Comment


                            #14
                            We use nylon strapping with a ratchet at the bow and cams at the stern. And one of these if an emergency arises. Cut and go.

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                            Patti & Gordon Lewandowski
                            Sammamish WA
                            1998 4788 (April 2018)
                            ”Knot Home”
                            MMSI 368040470

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                              #15
                              We have life raft, always have and would not have boat with out. A tender is tender and life raft is life raft. but that is for another day,
                              After having a tender slide looks, desire is secure the tender for all weather..... we have whaler 11' and other times like now an 11' In inmar, so the chocks work for both tenders are interchangeable with the swivel heads from weaver. I have pad eyes to secure bow, stern and mid ship on the tender, all are through bolt with backing plates. We have had our comes loose prior to this setup in rough weather it is beyond dangerous, thing also seem to happen to us at the worse possible time, never on sunny calm day! Very happy with my setup. The suncor stainless ratchet tie downs have quick releases so very quick in and out. We see boats that just secure there tender to the chocks, all is good until it is not....just my take, better secure then not!!!
                              Mark
                              USCG OUPV
                              1990 4588
                              Carlsbad, CA

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