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Salt water operation 38xx

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    #16
    Mine is a Sport Cub. Same plane except for the engine...Mine has 110 HP, the Carbon Cub has 180 HP (for 5 minutes). The 5 minute limit is a way of keeping in the LSA rules. Both models weigh only 850 pounds empty. I can climb at about 1100 FPM. The Carbon Cub can climb at 2500 FPM or better. 30 years ago I had a Piper Turbo Arrow III--probably close to performance of your 210. Great "go places" planes. I don't "go places" anymore--just flying for the pure enjoyment of flying--pretty much stay within 100 miles of home. (Cross wind landings in the taildragger are enough of an adventure!) If I was single, I would do like the kids that wrote the book about NJ to CA in a Cub and fly to the west coast, but I am afraid those types of adventures are in my past. Sorta like my goal to sail from US to England----took my wife to see the movie "Perfect Storm" and after, she refused to go anywhere in the boat unless we could see shore! So, that is why my cruising in a Bayliner will be pretty much always within site of land.

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      #17
      When we decided to upsize from our 2950 Encounter I got the Admiral, who also doesn’t do acrobatics, on a 45. Her reaction was “too big”. I had to figure out a modification to the command bridge ladder, then we bought ours.
      One of the first accessory purchases was a set of Bluetooth headsets. Marriage Savers. No need for increased voice volume to be heard. In fact, we talk at such a low speaking volume, thing stage whisper, that when she begins talking to someone on the dock setting up to help, I get blasted out. It’s become kind of a people watching sport.
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      MMSI 367770440

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        #18
        Originally posted by stroutmail View Post
        Thank you for your replies..very helpful. My home base will be north of Baltimore, MD. Mostly cruising in the northern Chesapeake Bay...Annapolis. St Micheals etc. Hopefully, also some time to cruise to FL via ICW, as well as a cruise up Hudson River in NY.

        Looking at 38xx, and 45xx. Most have EH Hino, but the 3888 have the 4 cyl. The $6000 price on manicooler, x2 got my attention. But, seems manicooler life may be more effected by coolant and engine load, than by raw water. I will treat each candidate as a unique individual.

        You might not necessarily have to replace the manifold if it becomes compromised. They can be repaired as long as it isn't completely rotten. At 31 years old, mine were leaking a little and needed to be serviced when I bought it. A machine shop ground out, rewelded, and then machined the beveled ends and made new a couple new cover plates. The inside was in great condition. I had mine ceramic coated. There is a thread somewhere on here. This year I'm going to drain, pull the end caps and reset the tube, and refill with coolant.
        . . .It places the lotion in the Basket. . .and that basket happens to be in a 1987 Bayliner 3870 w/ Hino 175's

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          #19
          You observation “Looking at 38xx, and 45xx. Most have EH Hino, but the 3888 have the 4 cyl” is not correct. The marketing department at Bayliner was hugely inconsistent with numbers. For instance, my 2950 Encounter measured 27’-11”. They used three numbers over the life of the 32 & 38. The numbers followed model years, the first ones were 3270 & 3870, then a few years later, around 1987, the numbers were changed to 3218 & 3818. I’m not sure what year the 3288 & 3888 numbers were implemented and went on to the end of production.
          I got curious at one point and called the marketing folks in Arlington, Wa long before Brunswick came along and asked the question. I asked if it had to do with where the boat was built as they built yachts on both coasts. I was told the numbers had nothing to do with features, basic changes or design.
          The progression of engine horsepower has more to do with the US Marine division messing around with the basic engine by adding turbos and intercoolers to boost performance. As they could get enough power out of the 4 cylinders, it became the diesel installed in the 3888 because it weighs less and costs less.
          If you are looking for logic or a connection, it’s not there.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          MMSI 367770440

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