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32XX Water Tank System Replacement Project-gctid351149

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    toukow wrote:
    Such boating is my intention as well. I didn't dream of boating to be sitting at a dock in town, though it sometimes has its merit. Thanks, Dean
    yes bad weather and it is much safer if i drink heavily and am not moving the boat.

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  • Guest
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    billsguns wrote:
    We do what a friend calls after one trip with us, wilderness boating, no docks, no towns, no groceries, no fuel, no water and my wifes favorit peve No laundry.
    Such boating is my intention as well. I didn't dream of boating to be sitting at a dock in town, though it sometimes has its merit. Thanks, Dean

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    toukow wrote:
    I agree a poly in the full size wasn't available and the shipping on the larger tanks is pricey. The height restriction was the killer. We're lucky in the NW to be able to get the OEM tank and pick it up if you're so inclined. 29 days- that's impressive. I'll have to work up from my 1 day, so no need for a water maker yet.

    Do post a photo of your install as I'm curious as to the size of such devices and where one would locate it. I've seen your posts here a lot, the amount of tranny's you go through, and the amount of boating that you do. I have assumed you're retired. Is that correct?
    Yes I am semi Retired I did have a full time job when I took my first 3 + month trip to Alaska. I do run a shooting sports business and marine electronics business durring the off boating season. We do what a friend calls after one trip with us, wilderness boating, no docks, no towns, no groceries, no fuel, no water and my wifes favorit peve No laundry. As for tranys since I have switched to 630's they are not an issue. I will post pictures of my water maker install as it happens. It was delivered today. It will be a time consuming job but not dificult. I will start a new thread. Ken Sanders thread on his water maker has made my installaton much easier

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    billsguns wrote:
    The aluminum tanks are 89 Gallon they did go to a polly tank at some point. I went through this a few years back when I put an inspection port in my tank and discovered the pitting. I replaced it with an OEM aluminum tank. I could not find a tank that was close in size in polly at that time. Water is important thing to us since we live on the hook for weeks. Last year we went 29 nights straight. Water maker is being delivered tomorrow
    I agree a poly in the full size wasn't available and the shipping on the larger tanks is pricey. The height restriction was the killer. We're lucky in the NW to be able to get the OEM tank and pick it up if you're so inclined. 29 days- that's impressive. I'll have to work up from my 1 day, so no need for a water maker yet.

    Do post a photo of your install as I'm curious as to the size of such devices and where one would locate it. I've seen your posts here a lot, the amount of tranny's you go through, and the amount of boating that you do. I have assumed you're retired. Is that correct?

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    NWCruiser wrote:
    Just a quick question on the old tank what is the best way to access the fill line at the front of the tank? I cannot see it in the pictures. Mine has come loose and I need to reattach it.
    When I did mine I had out the hot water tank so this may not be feasible- but I accessed if from the cave. Otherwise, see my post in a current thread about the freshwater level sensor. I do not know if my boat has had any modifications, but if you do as I showed in photos on mine, you may have limited access. I think it will be too tight to access from the master berth, but some people mention panels on some of the boats in that same area under the mattress. Good luck, Dean

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    There is a pannel at the front of the tank that you need to remove. If I remember correctly

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Just a quick question on the old tank what is the best way to access the fill line at the front of the tank? I cannot see it in the pictures. Mine has come loose and I need to reattach it.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    toukow wrote:
    Did the tanks ever change size during the production run? I thought I heard mention of a smaller tank when I was researching the matter.
    The aluminum tanks are 89 Gallon they did go to a polly tank at some point. I went through this a few years back when I put an inspection port in my tank and discovered the pitting. I replaced it with an OEM aluminum tank. I could not find a tank that was close in size in polly at that time. Water is important thing to us since we live on the hook for weeks. Last year we went 29 nights straight. Water maker is being delivered tomorrow

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    R&Jonthebay wrote:
    Nice job Dean.

    You also did a great job utilizing waisted space with the placement of the pressure tank and filter.
    Thanks for the comment. It seems an obvious solution but took me a while to get there I'm afraid.

    billsguns wrote:
    The original tank was 89 gallons There is an easy way to draw from the rear of the tank. You go to marine sanitation and buy a donut. Drill a hole in the top of your tank and install the donut and insert a plastic pickup tube into the tank through the donut hole
    Did the tanks ever change size during the production run? I thought I heard mention of a smaller tank when I was researching the matter. I think you're mentioning the 'uniseal' fittings which make sense for the solution you propose. When I replaced the holding tank, I just couldn't bring myself to use one (used bulkhead fittings) for such an installation given the possible repercussions. Everything I researched on them was positive, including comments from the RONCO representative and they're cheap too.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    The original tank was 89 gallons There is an easy way to draw from the rear of the tank. You go to marine sanitation and buy a donut. Drill a hole in the top of your tank and install the donut and insert a plastic pickup tube into the tank through the donut hole

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Nice job Dean.

    Putting the pick up in the rear of the tank is definitely the way to go. When I cut the access holes in my OE tank, there was well over ten gallons of water still in the tank after the pump ran dry. That meant that I was only getting 55-56 gallons out of a 69 gallon tank. You basically still have the same amount of accessible water as you did before.

    You also did a great job utilizing waisted space with the placement of the pressure tank and filter.

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  • Guest
    Guest started a topic 32XX Water Tank System Replacement Project-gctid351149

    32XX Water Tank System Replacement Project-gctid351149

    I wrote this a while back and saw the current post on the water sending unit (I used the WEMA unit as a replacment) so finally decided to post it. The pictures are big, but given the evidently large number of geezers on this forum, perhaps that's best.

    Well, I thought I had a leaking water tank but was mistaken. If I'd known before taking out the tank just how the bilge areas interconnect, I might not have made the misdiagnosis. I'm still not sure what all was going on but 1. I had water under the galley step (I think from a leaking tubing fitting just inside the forward cave bulkhead) and 2. Had water in the master berth bilge.

    So I pulled out the aluminum tank through the rear window (much fun had by all, OK, it was just me making it worse) and pressure tested it. No leaks. I was going to cheap out, cut some access holes to clean it, and put her back in. Then I read somewhere that the pitting that occurs on the aluminum happens behind the calcium deposits. So I chipped off some of those deposits and there was indeed significant pitting of the aluminum. This changed my mind on replacement.

    BTW: Water in the Pacific NW must be pretty good in general. I had seen pictures of the interior of water tanks on the forum which looked pretty scary for drinking water. Mine was very clean, other than the calcium deposits, and I would not have hesitated to drink the water if I'd kept the tank. In fact, when I first looked in it, it was so clear that the tank appeared empty.

    I researched the tanks and you can get the exact aluminum replacement from the original manufacturer up in Bellingham. I think it was going to run around $800 and that was with me picking it up. They will also make the tank with the standard forum recommended modification of moving the water tank outlet to the aft end of the tank. This will allow you to utilize more of the contents, given the stern squat of the 32's.

    So I looked at other options, one of which was to use a plastic tank from Ronco. The height dimension is the major constraint in selecting the replacement tank. I ended up buying the B308 which measures 64L x 22Wx 9 1/8H unit, and rated 50 gallons and a cost somewhere around half of the aluminum version. This has less capacity than the stated factory unit, but if you relocate the outlet to the stern you can minimize somewhat the difference in capacity. I've got to believe you lose a minimum of 10 gallons in the factory setup given the front outlet. This one is a bit narrower than the original, so I added cleats to the inside of the stringers with cross members (not shown in photo) for additional support.

    I had heard good things about Ronco, but now believe they cannot follow the most basic of directions, regardless of the detail provided. I provided an Autocad drawing in PDF format, and they couldn't even get the outlet on the correct side of the tank. I had requested for the outlet to be on the port side of the tank at the rear to avoid the additional 90 degree bend shown in the photo given where I relocated the water pump. I had access to stainless metal banding so I used the same approach as the factory for securing the new tank.



    My existing setup had the water pump in the cave, but also had a 2 gallon accumulator/pressure tank (which is massive, according to many of you in response to my previous post) installed as well. This made it very cramped for routing hoses, wires, etc. So I looked for a place to relocate it.

    In previous posts on maximizing useable space, some of you pointed out that you had found storage in the dead space to the port of the refrigerator. It was a perfect location for the massive pressure tank, new pump with strainer, and I installed a 'whole boat' water filter to boot. My refrigerator is easily removed and this makes working on the system much more comfortable and it was dead space to boot. And somehow I like having the fresh water supply separated from the head holding tank, but that's probably just me.



    I also reworked almost all of the water tubing. I made the mistake of putting my finger inside the water fill line during tank removal. This forced me replace that as well, given the wonderful sliminess of it all after so many years. In for a penny, might as well be in for a pound.

    So the pump and pressure tank relocation opened up the area under the helm for access. The smaller tank probably isn't as big of reduction as it sounds over the factory setup given the outlet relocation to the rear. I also like the additional storage under the bed (plywood plank is removed in photo) and access to this area of the bilge for checking from time to time. On a long trip I will store water jugs there to help mitigate the tank size reduction.



    For what it's worth, Dean
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