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EH-700 Manicooler/Riser Inspection

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    EH-700 Manicooler/Riser Inspection

    My port engine is running about 20 degrees hotter than usual. I thought the problem was on the raw water side but after replacing the shaft seal and impeller on the raw water pump I'm getting good flow of sea water and I think the problem is with the fresh water coolant side. I need to change out the coolant in my engines anyway so now is a good time to take apart the manicooler and riser and check things out. I'm also thinking that replacing the thermostat and radiator cap would also be a good idea. The problem is I'm totally unfamiliar with this coolant system so as usual I'm looking to have some basic and silly sounding questions answered. Most of my questions are posed in these pictures. I'll post the pictures here and try to recap my questions below.

    #2
    So I'll try to organize my thoughts now, though I literally don't know where to start:

    1. I guess that is my first question. Where should I start? What part should I disconnect first to check out the manicooler?
    2. Could it be possible that I have red coolant in the lower part of the system and green coolant in the manicooler and the block and manicooler are not connecting at all? That really sounds like a ridiculous question already, my apologies.
    3. Are most people running red coloured coolant in these engines? Is that heavy duty coolant from NAPA red coloured?

    Right now I have to keep it under or around 2100 RPM to stay around or below 175 degrees. Any higher and I climb as high as 200 degrees and I'm not comfortable with that. Starboard engine is a solid 165 - 175 no matter how hard I push it and I'm pretty sure the port engine used to be the same (boat is new to me and I'm new to boats).

    Comment


      #3
      Exploded EH700ti engine parts
      https://www.crowleymarine.com/mercur...s/1703_180.cfm

      I'm not a mechanic but, if not a stuck thermostat, would suspect the exhaust riser first then work upstream

      There is a block drain on the port engine side behind the starter. It should have a short piece if hose on it. I replaced that hose with a piece long enough to reach the lazarett. This was helpful when flushing the system and using a pump.

      Attached is a TSB
      Attached Files
      Irony
      1989 Bayliner 4588 - EH700TI
      Portsmouth, NH

      Comment


        #4
        Bry, do you have overflow jugs for your coolant? If not, adding them will stabilize the coolant level in the engine. Next, one type of coolant - red. Diesel heavy duty from whatever equates to NAPA in Canada. Flush the green stuff out, fill with plain water, run it for a few minutes, flush again until the water is clear.
        If you haven’t separated the first section of exhaust hose from the riser, it’s a good place to start. You can get good flow but still have riser pretty well closed off where the raw water is dumped into the hose. Pulling the manicooler is a bit down the list of things to check out. The plates you are asking about are for casting to let the inner skeleton drain.
        P/C Pete
        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
        1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
        MMSI 367770440
        1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
        Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

        Comment


          #5
          Bry, yes the thermostat s where you think it is. I doubt that’s your problem. The manicooler drain is as where you pointed to. As mentioned there’s also a block drain. IMHO now is the time to remove both manicoolers. You will accomplish many things upon removal and they are: clean all of the built up mud from the insides, inspect the tapered, machined surfaces at each end for pitting and corrosion, inspect and clean the bundles that reside in each cooler. Lastly, I’d ceramic coat each manicooler. Replace all old coolant hoses as they are far more readily accessible with the coolers removed.
          Jim Gandee
          1989 3888
          Hino 175's
          Fire Escape
          [email protected]

          Comment


          • Destiny_4588
            Destiny_4588 commented
            Editing a comment
            Having been down the road a few years back, Jim is right on...just want to add that you need to order the Orings for cooling bundle and any other gaskets my model is TI for tubro and aftercooler which add a bunch of little replaceable sealing like parts each time you remove them...not sure on your model what there is but I would guess something to exhaust riser atleast. Have them pressure test the cooling bundle when out (we skipped this step as look clean and system pressure tested fine cold, but ultimately that was a bad call we just replaced a bundle as it has small leak that only showed when the engine was hot.

          #6
          Pics
          Attached Files
          Jim Gandee
          1989 3888
          Hino 175's
          Fire Escape
          [email protected]

          Comment


          • Smitten
            Smitten commented
            Editing a comment
            You must have bags of money under your bunk Jim. I want that boat when you're ready to sell. At least those beautiful engines!

          #7
          Wow, your engine looks spanky clean Jim, I'm a little jealous. What air filter are you using? Thanks for all advice, I'm feeling confident enough to start taking things apart now. I am going to wait until after my Daughter visits this week though, don't want the boat to be out of commission while she's here.

          Comment


            #8
            Bry, Thank you for your comments! Feel very confident about pulling the coolers but as Destiny states order up your gaskets in advance. You will need the exhaust manifold, exhaust riser gaskets and the manicooler o rings. Now, when you reinstall the bundles in the coolers there is one school of thought that the bundles should be electrically isolated from the coolers. This is one function of the orings. Use you multimeter, one probe on the bundle through an inspection plate, the other probe on the cooler. Some others state this is unnecessary, I don’t rightly know one way or the other but I was able to isolate both of my bundles when I installed them. Who knows if they remain isolated today, I should check it just for the heck of it. If your filter question is regarding the air filter it’s a K&N RU-0960 which you can find here: https://www.amazon.com/RU-0960-Universal-Clamp-Air-Filter/dp/B00029WZTS




            Jim Gandee
            1989 3888
            Hino 175's
            Fire Escape
            [email protected]

            Comment


              #9
              Do as much planning and provisioning in advance as possible. Jim is right about the gaskets and hoses. Cool Beans did his hoses from a couple of long sections with the right bends. Save a ton of money that way. Second, there’s an outfit in the Kent/Auburn area just south of Seattle that is very familiar with ceramic coating Hino manicoolers. They also have a weld shop that can repair repairable areas and a machine shop to clean up the surfaces that need it. Seattle Radiator is the go to shop on this side of the line for servicing the bundles.
              P/C Pete
              Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
              1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
              Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
              1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
              MMSI 367770440
              1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
              Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

              Comment

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