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Going to dry storage my 4087 in Anacortes from now on.-gctid350194

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    Going to dry storage my 4087 in Anacortes from now on.-gctid350194

    I'm becoming a snow bird, moving to Scottsdale area in AZ.

    We have decided to dry store our 4087 at North Harbor Diesel for about 7 months of the year. The rest will be the usual wandering around the San Juan and Gulf Islands to escape the worst of the AZ heat.

    I know I'm going to have to winterize the water system next fall, as it won't have the relatively warm salt water to keep the temps up.

    Are there any other tips or suggestions from the team?

    I'm going to get my dinghy shrunk wrapped and keep it underneath, was wondering if I should go to the expense of having the 4087 done? Any one have a clue how much it is to shrink wrap a large boat?

    She has a semi ablative bottom paint currently that's been really good, was thinking of staying with that unless I hear differently.

    Lets have your thoughts please.

    Machog
    1996 4087 Lazy Days
    2011 11’ West Marine Rib 350 Lazy Mac
    2011 Porsche Cayman
    2010 Lexus IS 250C
    2008 Honda Ridgeline

    #2
    Hello.

    I keep a 42' Carver in the water year round in Coeur d' Alene Idaho. We winterize all systems and the engines. The engines have FWC but still need the exhaust done. We get colder here than in Anacortes but if it was my boat I would not risk it. I also run a Xtreme Engine Room heater. It turns on at 40 and off at 50. Over here we shrink wrap in mid October and take it off in April or May depending on the weather. We wash the boat before it is wrapped and come spring time it is still nice and clean. No dust or mold. My shrink wrap guy does a great job and it is worth the $800 that he charges. It takes a half a day to wrap my boat. All the snow just slides right off. We have had storms with up to 60mph winds and it stays on no problem. I think Pacific Marine Center in Anacortes can store your boat inside.

    Happy Boating

    Comment


      #3
      You need to drain all fresh water and winterize the traps, as you've noted. Any other freshwater systems that aren't protected (heating?) need to be drained or protected. I would also drain any raw water systems to be sure.

      You don't want to have everything so tight that moisture can't escape. It needs to breathe or you will face some mold problems during the year.

      NHD are experts at this, I would expect they will give you the "package" service.

      Comment


        #4
        Many in Michigan store inside, some heated. We store our 38 inside, unheated. I drain everything except the antifreeze.

        Never a problem. With the heavy snows we get I wouldn't want it outside. Leaving the canvas up is a real plus.

        Doug
        Started boating 1955
        Number of boats owned 32
        Bayliners
        2655
        2755
        2850
        3870 presently owned
        Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

        Comment


          #5
          We keep our 4087 in Duluth MN outside for the wiinter. I drain the raw water in Cummins engines per the manual, run RV antifreeze thru the generator raw water system, again per the manual. Drain the fresh water system and holding tanks, and use RV antifreeze throughout. Run RV antifreeze through the A/C system. Charge and disconnect the batteries. We then cover it with an Aqualon cover which covers from the top of the flybridge to the waterline. No issues so far.

          [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/653206=24608-IMG_1971.jpg[/img]

          Comment


            #6
            In addition to above for engine, potable water, and drains, remove standing water from bilges and other compartments until dry. Stabilize fuel. Close-off engine compartment vents (if not under shrink-wrap). Ensure bilge pumps are operable if heavy rains get in so you don't "sink on land". Place a low wattage air circulator (50 to 100 watts) and large dry-z-air or damp-rid in larger compartments to keep moisture down inside. Remove all bedding, stand all cushsons & matresses on end so they breath. Open drawers, cupboards, etc.; remove all food; clean & vacuum throughout. Double support hull against winter wind and unless shrink-wrapping, double secure tarps. Lightly spray WD-40 or similar on most mechanical equipment. Think about batteries and chargers and whether you leave on or off; coordinate with bilge pump plan (usually leave batts off, as bilge pumps should be direct wired). Think about every detail and what happens during heavy wind & rain, and deep freeze under ice & snow. Drop, secure, or remove dingy, fenders, lines, antennas, and so forth. Think carefully about leaving any canvas directly exposed to weather. Ideally have someone check your boat monthly, especially Nov thru Jan when most cold & heavy weather hits. Good luck, Doug S.

            Comment


              #7
              Doug S wrote:
              In addition to above for engine, potable water, and drains, remove standing water from bilges and other compartments until dry. Stabilize fuel. Close-off engine compartment vents (if not under shrink-wrap). Ensure bilge pumps are operable if heavy rains get in so you don't "sink on land". Place a low wattage air circulator (50 to 100 watts) and large dry-z-air or damp-rid in larger compartments to keep moisture down inside. Remove all bedding, stand all cushsons & matresses on end so they breath. Open drawers, cupboards, etc.; remove all food; clean & vacuum throughout. Double support hull against winter wind and unless shrink-wrapping, double secure tarps. Lightly spray WD-40 or similar on most mechanical equipment. Think about batteries and chargers and whether you leave on or off; coordinate with bildge pump plan (usually leave batts off, as bilge pumps should be direct wired). Think about every detail and what happens during heavy wind & rain, and deep freeze under ice & snow. Drop, secure, or remove dingy, fenders, lines, antennas, and so forth. Think carefully about leaving any canvas directly exposed to weather. Ideally have someone check your boat monthly, especially Nov thru Jan when most cold & heavy weather hits. Good luck, Doug S.
              Wow look at all that stuff I haven't done in over 35 years of boating on Puget Sound. Mine is a lot simpler. I stabilize dingy tank fuel. I turn inverter down so it thinks that there is only 5 amps of shore power availiable. I set up one heat lamp in bilge looking at gen set. I turn on the engine heater breakers. I set up one electric heater in the master stateroom and set it at 45 degrees. I leave inverter battery charger run all winter. Never charge start battery or gen battery all winter and they always start in spring. Never turn any batteries off. I do put down a couple of extra fenders and a couple extra lines. Earl services my Hinos and gen set the day after Labor Day, and no prep for storage made, but they are ready to go in the spring. Dingy is where it always is. Do remove bedding but just to launder it for the next season, then stow back on boat. I do put my fishing rods inside as they are usually hanging from Bimini top. Never open cupboards,drawers or flip up mattresses. Never had any mildew in over 35 years of keeping boats in Puget Sound on Bayliners from 26 feet to 47 feet. . Boat sits for 7 months mostly unattended, except for friends walking by on dock. You can overthink this winterizing I believe.
              Started boating 1965
              Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

              Comment


                #8
                You can never overthink winterizing. Plan for the absolute worst that can or has ever happened in your area.

                Imo, leaving a boat basically unattended in the water for 7 months isn't something I would think about doing.

                Just to many thinks can happen. If it hasn't happened to you in 35 years, you are over do.

                A power failure with a winter storm that brings freezing temps could happen.

                In my case I know there will be hard freezes so I don't have to wonder if I did enough. It has got as low as 50 below so I winterize with that in mind.

                We all have seen pictures of boats in Washington sinking because of a heavy snow load. It could happen to any boat.
                Started boating 1955
                Number of boats owned 32
                Bayliners
                2655
                2755
                2850
                3870 presently owned
                Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                Comment


                  #9
                  So how do you protect your boat from heavy snowfall and loss of power for a week or more due to excessive/record cold and ice? Have had that happenu a couple of times without damage except left over exploding soda cans in the powered off refer. As I have gotten older I have learned to worry about things you can control. As far as leaving boat unattended for seven months each winter, I enjoy Az winters a lot more than Puget Sound winters.
                  Started boating 1965
                  Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                  Comment


                    #10
                    mmichellich wrote:
                    So how do you protect your boat from heavy snowfall and loss of power for a week or more due to excessive/record cold and ice? Have had that happenu a couple of times without damage except left over exploding soda cans in the powered off refer. As I have gotten older I have learned to worry about things you can control. As far as leaving boat unattended for seven months each winter, I enjoy Az winters a lot more than Puget Sound winters.
                    How do I protect my boat in the winter? I drain all the fresh water lines and tank. Put antifreeze in the toilet and holding tank and shower tub along with washing machine.

                    Remove the strainer on each engine and run 3 gallons of antifreeze with engine at idle and stop engine. Do the same with genny except watch exhaust until antifreeze comes out.

                    This takes maybe 1 hour.

                    It is then hauled and stored inside for the winter. Strong steel building that will handle the snow load.

                    The canvas stays up. Quick and easy and I leave for 7 months and know my boat is protected.

                    I don't worry about a fitting failing or anything else that could do harm.

                    In the spring or fall I am allowed to work on anything that doesn't make dust. Electric is supplied.

                    Total cost including in and out is about $2,000 for my 38xx.

                    Doug
                    Started boating 1955
                    Number of boats owned 32
                    Bayliners
                    2655
                    2755
                    2850
                    3870 presently owned
                    Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                    Comment


                      #11
                      dmcb wrote:
                      How do I protect my boat in the winter? I drain all the fresh water lines and tank. Put antifreeze in the toilet and holding tank and shower tub along with washing machine.

                      Remove the strainer on each engine and run 3 gallons of antifreeze with engine at idle and stop engine. Do the same with genny except watch exhaust until antifreeze comes out.

                      This takes maybe 1 hour.

                      It is then hauled and stored inside for the winter. Strong steel building that will handle the snow load.

                      The canvas stays up. Quick and easy and I leave for 7 months and know my boat is protected.

                      I don't worry about a fitting failing or anything else that could do harm.

                      In the spring or fall I am allowed to work on anything that doesn't make dust. Electric is supplied.

                      Total cost including in and out is about $2,000 for my 38xx.

                      Doug
                      Well good for you. You use your approach and I will use mine.
                      Started boating 1965
                      Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I will do that. I wasn't suggesting you do anything different. You ask and I told you.

                        However I don't worry about things I can't control because I control them. I don't leave it to chance.
                        Started boating 1955
                        Number of boats owned 32
                        Bayliners
                        2655
                        2755
                        2850
                        3870 presently owned
                        Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Machog asked about winterizing on the hard, not afloat - much higher risk of freeze damage. Up on the blocks usually increases wind exposure and force. This winter's Puget Sound wind storms followed by snow & ice shreaded a lot of canvas and tarps, not to mention sub-freezing weather damage in conjunction with numerous power outages. We have had multiple boats stored on the hard in Puget Sound for years - easier to protect in the fall, than repair in the spring. Tarps & shrink wrap shed snow better than canvas - brace-up the fly bridge canvas bows - a little bit goes a long way, especially if you can have someone check for you after the biggest storms. Do not count on heaters for freeze protection - when in doubt fully winterize. Mold is a mess once it starts. The benefit is on the hard you don't have to worry about your boat sinking, smashing into the dock, or into other boats, plus less marine growth and less corrossion - best to flush the salt out of everything before storage as well. Good luck, Doug S.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I have had my '99 4087 nine years and have always kept it in heated storage over the winter. I cost me around $3500. I park it and walk away. Add up everything it cost to keep it outside and to me it's close enough to spend a few extra bucks for my boat to sit in a 55 degree building all winter.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              LarryJ82 wrote:
                              I have had my '99 4087 nine years and have always kept it in heated storage over the winter. I cost me around $3500. I park it and walk away. Add up everything it cost to keep it outside and to me it's close enough to spend a few extra bucks for my boat to sit in a 55 degree building all winter.
                              The best way as long as you are sure the heat can be on at the worst condition. In my area this storage is not easily available. Only one place does it and my costs would be over triple what I now pay and I couldn't work on my boat while stored inside.
                              Started boating 1955
                              Number of boats owned 32
                              Bayliners
                              2655
                              2755
                              2850
                              3870 presently owned
                              Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                              Comment

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