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Novurania 430DL on a 4788?

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  • simbad
    replied
    I probably should not open the debate on the tow lines as there are diehards that swear by the Amsteel. But I talked to a lot people that had used standard line, a lot cheaper and not had any issues and same for me. My shorter lines are standard floating nylon line that also helps absorb shock and my long line is a heavier duty line that was on the boat when I got it. Couldn’t tell you the strength of the lines. I got mine at fisheries and chatted with the guys there. What I got was a lot lighter looking than I expected but it shows no sign of wear and has never been an issue but i tend to use that for slower tows anyway.

    the large cleat aft and center on my swimstep is a massive plus though. Negates the need for a bridal and tows really straight. And then i also use for dock lines aft all the time too. It’s a great addition.

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  • jmoultray
    replied
    I am definitely going to set up a tow rig for the dinghy, even if we do wind up able to put it up top, the ease of towing it may be worthwhile along with knowing we have a backup plan in rough seas to not have any shock loads for a heavy lift. I have towed a large tender on a friend's boat many times and it was never a big deal but it was something that had to be accounted for and dealt with, watched, etc. (I will keep a dsc portable vhf onboard the dinghy in case it gets lost we can do a position request, which is set to auto answer on the radio, and not have it disappear forever)

    Simbad, with your setup what strength line did you use? specifically the amsteel blue...

    Once I get the dinghy back on July 3rd I'll update with how this all turns out. It may take me a little while before I even bother trying to lift it up given I will need to modify the rails and chocks to put it sideways if we go that route.

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  • simbad
    commented on 's reply
    Too high !

  • igiftmon
    replied
    Hey buddy...how high can you get the dinghy to jump out of the water in 6-8 foot seas?

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  • simbad
    replied
    We have 2 short lines. One right behind the boat with the tender only a couple of feet behind the boat. We only use this for at idle slow towing. If we are doing a very short run or pulling into an anchorage or marina etc. we have a mid size line for running up to 12 knots that doesn’t put her as far back but is easier to pull back in. The short line works great if we are going nice and slow.

    As for docking. If it’s an easy slip like an outside linear dock with not a lot around we simply use the short line and reversing, spinning etc she just stays quite right to the aft of the boat. And when docked we pull her in.
    If it’s a tighter marina we actually pull up outside. Pull on the dinghy and tie it to the two rear cleats parallel to the swim step. So the dinghy is essentially sideways tied snug to the boat. As long as it’s slow movements. This is totally fine and just as if the tender is an extension to the boat. And when we dock she’s already tied up ready to go

    we tow all summer. And works great. And when i’m too lazy to go throw the long line on I save a ton in diesel on the big boat going slow

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  • baylineguy
    replied
    Simbad, when towing with the long line you have the tender on the back side of the second wave if I understand you right. How far is the tender behind the mother boat when you are towing it with the short line?
    Also, how do you handle the tender when docking the big boat?

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  • simbad
    replied

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  • simbad
    replied
    Josh. Everyone skipped the towing question.
    We keep a 14ft zodiac with 50hp Honda on ours. Obviously we have a bigger Davit crane and my fly ridge is reinforced with big stainless stanchions.
    But
    We tow it all summer everywhere. And it’s really not a big deal. We have a short line for small local no wake speed tows. We have an extension to that line for higher speed tows on fair weather that we simply caribiner connect to the short line and we have a long line for rough sea or longer distance.
    We have hit real bad weather and towed her fine. We can tow at 17 knots in good weather and she tracks straight behind the second wave.
    Always engine up.
    It makes for easy fast dinghy access when you get to port and leaves your fbridge free and clear for sun loungers and cocktails

    sounds like a nice dink. I’d consider towing before you downsize.

    note we don’t use a bridal but do have a large oversized clear right in the middle of the swim-step fwd at the base of the transom and this keeps her nice and centered.

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  • ksanders
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks! I will be following your journey very closely and taking notes of your experiences.

  • Woodsea
    replied
    For the original poster... I really like Marks idea of weighing the dinghy in real life with the scale. We really like our 12’ Rendova with 40HP Yamaha and 16 gallon fuel tank but it seems like it is maxing out the crane. It would be nice to know what it actually weights for $50! Shock loading can also be pretty severe when the big boat is bouncing in any kind of sea state while retrieving. I have a tow bridle that I can use to pull dinghy if sea state is too rough.

    I am also thinking about a lighter skiff to complement the Rendova. I have been thinking about building a stitch and glue 11-12’ rowing/sailing dinghy. Weighs about 100#. Maybe put a little tiny 1-2 hp outboard on it with self contained gas tank. At any rate this is thread drift...

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  • Destiny_4588
    replied
    Happy share the experience and what we learn

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  • ksanders
    replied
    Originally posted by Destiny_4588 View Post
    Kevin we are doing exactly that have ordered (hoping-it comes in in the next month) an 11’ inmar inflatable aluminum bottom, 20hp Yamaha pull start and landing wheels total boat weigh about 325 and even doing a hopefully much easier to pull up a beach in Baja ...

    whaler going to trailer for little vacation for next or next year or two, wife still prefers the stability and dryer ride she thinks
    Baja is exactly what I was thinking about regarding a lighter skiff. Not too many dingy docks there

    I am planning on following you down in 2021. I might do CUBAR, and might just solo it, time will tell as the plans all get worked out..

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  • Destiny_4588
    replied
    Kevin we are doing exactly that have ordered (hoping-it comes in in the next month) an 11’ inmar inflatable aluminum bottom, 20hp Yamaha pull start and landing wheels total boat weigh about 325 and even doing a hopefully much easier to pull up a beach in Baja ...

    whaler going to trailer for little vacation for next or next year or two, wife still prefers the stability and dryer ride she thinks

    Leave a comment:


  • Sunbird
    replied
    A lot of good information has been provided. I would definitely weigh the dinghy so you know exactly how much weight you are trying to lift. Have you tried to contact the manufacturer of the davit? They should be able to give specifications of what the actual capacity is. I bought a dock mounted lift for my 14' Zodiac Pro-. The lift manufacturer recommended a 1500 lb lift versus the 1000lb lift I intended to buy. They said they never recommend loading any of their lifts to the max rating as they recommended not exceeding 75% of rated load capacity. My dinghy according to manufacturer weights would have been 750-800lbs.

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  • Norton_Rider
    replied
    Originally posted by ksanders View Post
    I have a different take on tenders.

    On my 4788 I currently have a Zodiac YL340 with a honda 30 HP engine.

    It is a wonderful skiff. Fast, comfortable.

    Where is really has challenges is if I actually try to use it for anything that involves a shore landing.

    It is flat out too heavy to comfortably take to shore, drag above the high water line, and expect to get it launched again.

    What I am seriously considering for my future exploring is to downsize to something that I can drag around. A RIB design, but lighter, and with just a few HP engine.

    My buddy had the same issue with his boat's tender. He kept the existing tender/davit on the hardtop and got a 10' aluminum hull rib with a 15hp engine on a swim step davit. This way he had a fast, comfortable tender for longer trips and a light weight tender he could easily beach.

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