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    Anchoring system with short bow pulpit

    I’m learning a lot about anchors and how they interface with bow pulpits. Hopefully this helps others....The prior owner removed our bow pulpit. I like it this way but it is not without compromises. We easily fit into a 50’ slip. Huge plus. The selection of anchors becomes limited. Not necessarily a negative but.....

    I bought a Manson Supreme 80# 4 years ago. Love it. It feels bullet proof when it’s down. Current change, wind change... no problem. However, retrieving and bringing the anchor home can get exciting. (Tried to attach video but no luck) 90% of the time anchor comes up and rests like it is supposed to. 10% of the time the angle becomes too great and the chain comes off the gypsy. That’s when the chain starts a runaway. I’ve been “managing” it by slowly standing on the chain with my rubber boots. It’s happened 4-5 times. Unacceptable! The problem is one of geometry. The anchor shank rises too vertically before the leverage starts to pull it lower. When it close to its max is when it slips out of the gypsy. I’ve gotten a few ideas of using a boat hook or a rope tied to the shank to help it home. I tried both and it helped but not enough to make me feel comfortable to be trying it on a pitching deck in the middle of the night with my wife driving the boat.

    I have just purchased (today) a Vulcan 33kg or 73#. The shank design seems to work better with the shortened bow pulpit. The shank does not rise as high so it looks like the chain will remain in the gypsy. Now however, because of the shape, the problem is the possible banging of the anchor into the hull. I may have to try it and adjust from there with either a longer bow pulpit of a bit of “big boat” bling of a SS bow protector.

    We love anchoring out. But the anchoring system (not just the anchor)needs to be pretty bulletproof in my opinion or I just don’t sleep as soundly.

    To be continued.....

    I tried to post videos but no luck. That really tells a story.


    2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
    12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
    MV Kia Orana
    Currently Alameda CA

    #2
    Originally posted by Woodsea View Post
    I’m learning a lot about anchors and how they interface with bow pulpits. Hopefully this helps others....The prior owner removed our bow pulpit. I like it this way but it is not without compromises. We easily fit into a 50’ slip. Huge plus. The selection of anchors becomes limited. Not necessarily a negative but.....

    I bought a Manson Supreme 80# 4 years ago. Love it. It feels bullet proof when it’s down. Current change, wind change... no problem. However, retrieving and bringing the anchor home can get exciting. (Tried to attach video but no luck) 90% of the time anchor comes up and rests like it is supposed to. 10% of the time the angle becomes too great and the chain comes off the gypsy. That’s when the chain starts a runaway. I’ve been “managing” it by slowly standing on the chain with my rubber boots. It’s happened 4-5 times. Unacceptable! The problem is one of geometry. The anchor shank rises too vertically before the leverage starts to pull it lower. When it close to its max is when it slips out of the gypsy. I’ve gotten a few ideas of using a boat hook or a rope tied to the shank to help it home. I tried both and it helped but not enough to make me feel comfortable to be trying it on a pitching deck in the middle of the night with my wife driving the boat.

    I have just purchased (today) a Vulcan 33kg or 73#. The shank design seems to work better with the shortened bow pulpit. The shank does not rise as high so it looks like the chain will remain in the gypsy. Now however, because of the shape, the problem is the possible banging of the anchor into the hull. I may have to try it and adjust from there with either a longer bow pulpit of a bit of “big boat” bling of a SS bow protector.

    We love anchoring out. But the anchoring system (not just the anchor)needs to be pretty bulletproof in my opinion or I just don’t sleep as soundly.

    To be continued.....

    I tried to post videos but no luck. That really tells a story.

    I had a chain runaway once, really scary! Like you I was able to stand on the chain.

    Thanks goodness I had shoes on! Often times I’m setting and pulling the anchor in flip flops or bare feet.

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA

    Comment


      #3
      I’m guessing a vertical windlass?
      Dave
      Edmonds, WA
      "THE FIX"
      '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
      (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
      Misc. projects thread
      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

      Comment


        #4
        Hey Steve. I’m not sure I understand your angle issue. When I lift mine, I try to be directly vertically above it, with a guide (usually my wife) pointing any chain angles as I manoeuvre the boat towards it so the windless chain strain is reduced. But a few ideas... Firstly given that you don’t have a pulpit, I think you need one of those SS wrap around bow protectors. My neighbor with his Meridian 58 has a similar setup, vertical windlass and no pulpit. That would certainly help protect the hull from chains that whip round etc.

        Second, I remember seeing at a local boat show a “U” shape guide on an anchor brand, it may have been Muir, that ensures the chain can’t jump out. Is there some way you can rig up a “U” guide arrangement across the chain channel?

        Third, I splashed out and bought an Ultra anchor a couple of seasons ago. It really is a great anchor but not inexpensive. It has an auto correcting type shackle that ensures when it comes up, the anchor faces the correct way. The shackle is not inexpensive either but could probably be used on your anchor to ensure it comes up ready to slot in correctly.

        Hope this helps. Cheers
        John H
        Brisbane QLD Aust
        "Harbor-nating"

        2000 - 4788/Cummins 370's

        Comment


          #5
          I’m thinking about an articulating anchor roller similar to this:
          https://www.mauriprosailing.com/us/p...FSAerQYdspAF9A
          Even though we still have our pulpit, I don’t like the angle and strain that the shank creates as the anchor comes through the roller and before it rotates into the stowed position.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
          MMSI 367770440
          1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
          Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

          Comment


            #6
            I can see how a shortened pulpit can lead to a runaway chain on the 4788’s horizontal windlass with some anchors.

            As the anchor comes onto the anchor roller if the shank lifts up a lot, and with the shorter distances the chain could loose contact with the top of the gypsy causing the runaway.

            I think you are on the right track with the vulcan anchor because of it’s curved shank.

            Another thought would be some kind of chain guide. I tried to google it and got lots of “guides” on how to buy an anchor. . The piece I’m thinking of would be like a very short piece of pipe, with a HDPE liner similar to the way shrimp/crab pot pullers go together.

            KEVIN SANDERS
            4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA

            Comment


              #7
              Builerdude, Right! Here is a pic showing current set up and a pic with new Vulcan.

              John, We retrieve the same way so no problems there. It’s when the anchor is clear of the water and could start swinging that may necessitate a need for protection on the bow. The gypsy chain angle problem seems to be solved with the Vulcan so that’s good. I’ve seen the hoops you describe. If I stay with the Vulcan, it does not look like it will be necessary. I may install a chain stopper between the gypsy and the shackle which would also provide an upper travel limit of the chain. Curious what size Ultra you went with? The local distributor says the 60# is what he would recommend. I’ve thought about that option as well utilizing a Ultra bow roller, anchor and swivel. That doubles the cost of the system and may still require bow protection.

              Kevin, I’ve considered some sort of chain guide. I don’t have enough room for anything with the Manson. It’s a really good anchor but does not work with my existing geometry. The Vulcan gives me a little more space to work with. That said, I don’t believe the chain rises up to much to cause the gypsy chain problem.

              I’m also going to rebuild my windlass and replace gypsy. The new gypsy with sharper teeth should help as well.

              I will probably go with a new SS bow roller assembly that will be more designed to work with whatever anchor I end up with. The existing one is for a 44# Bruce that’s now my back up anchor.
              2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
              12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
              MV Kia Orana
              Currently Alameda CA

              Comment


              • higgins_jr
                higgins_jr commented
                Editing a comment
                Steve, I went with the 27 kg which is the 60lb option your local distributor suggested. Cheers

              #8
              2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
              12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
              MV Kia Orana
              Currently Alameda CA

              Comment


                #9
                This is really interesting! I have never seen a 4788 without the bow pulpit, and with a vertical windlass.

                Very nice looking setup!

                KEVIN SANDERS
                4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA

                Comment


                  #10
                  Woodsea, I don't have a 4788 but I took the pulpit off my 3288 and replaced it with a Mantus bow roller and a Vulcan anchor. The benefit, besides not having a bendy pulpit, is the Mantus roller over hangs the bow by several inches and it fits the Vulcan anchor perfectly. The mantis has two rollers and one adjusts itself with the curve of the Vulcan. Mantus also has the option of putting on a V shaped attachment that stops your anchor's point before it ever gets to the hull. I have a smaller Vulcan, 44 pounds, but the shape is identical. Here in Alaska I wish I'd have gone 1 size bigger just because. :^)

                  Comment


                    #11
                    One other thing, the Vulcan self-launches off the Mantus setup slick as a whistle and the bar that goes over the outside roller stops the anchor cold.

                    Comment


                      #12
                      We went with a Vulcan 33 (kg). Probably a bit of overkill but I like to sleep soundly when anchored. So far we never moved at all while anchored regardless of wind and tide changes.
                      Patti & Gordon Lewandowski
                      Sammamish WA
                      1998 4788 (April 2018)
                      ”Knot Home”

                      Comment


                        #13
                        Originally posted by Woodsea View Post
                        ...................Here is a pic showing current set up and a pic with new Vulcan........
                        You'll like the Vulcan. I've had one on our 3788 for a while now and I love it. It sets immediately and holds well. I do not have any sort of swivel on it; yet it always comes up right side up. It tends to collect a lot of mud on the top of the flukes. I found out that the easiest way to clean it is to idle forward with the anchor flukes in the water. This cleans off the mud quickly.

                        A few weeks ago I saw a 3988 without an anchor pulpit. It had a roller mount that extended aft quite a bit. Toward the aft part of the roller mount there was a roller an inch or so above the chain, held in place by two vertical stainless pieces that were bolted to each side of the roller mount. The aft roller ensured that angle of the chain coming off the windlass remained constant.



                        1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                        2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                        Anacortes, WA

                        Comment


                          #14
                          I have a bridle that I use to take the load off my pulpit and put it onto the cleats on either side of the pulpit. There is a lot of force on the anchor, especially if the winds pick up or you get some swell action. Plus, I don't trust the gypsy to hold onto the chain.

                          My bridal is simple. It consists of a length of line with a chain hook in the middle. When I get enough road out, I simply attach the hook to the chain and the end of the lines to the cleats on either side of the pulpit. Then let out the chain until the load if off the windlass and on the bridal. This way there is no load on the pulpit or the gypsy.

                          You may not see it, but the pulpit is a big lever and all that tugging on it can cause a break in the seal and moisture to get in and under the pulpit and eventually cause deck rot.

                          Just another process to consider.
                          Patrick and Patti
                          4588 Pilothouse 1991
                          12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
                          M/V "Paloma"
                          MMSI # 338142921

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Bridles are a whole ‘nother topic but something that in my opinion should be a part on anyone’s ground tackle “kit”. There are many reasons and many options but for us any anchoring other than a quick stop in fair weather includes attaching the bridle.
                            Patti & Gordon Lewandowski
                            Sammamish WA
                            1998 4788 (April 2018)
                            ”Knot Home”

                            Comment

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