Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

fresh water tank sensor-gctid350041

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    fresh water tank sensor-gctid350041

    i am hoping someone can tell me the location of the fresh water tank sensor in a 1991 3288. thanks all

    #2
    Not sure on a 3288, but typically the sensor is a float type mountec on the top of the wate tank. The float can become waterlogged and sink. I replaced mine with a small plastic bottle and iot has worked fine since.

    Comment


      #3
      Well I hope the op doesn't mix the two tanks.
      Started boating 1955
      Number of boats owned 32
      Bayliners
      2655
      2755
      2850
      3870 presently owned
      Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

      Comment


        #4
        In the master berth, at the forward wall and at the foot of the mattress, there is a small access panel.

        Remove this panel and you'll see the water tank sensor.

        As mentioned earlier, the float gets waterlogged.

        Some people have replaced it with a wine cork.

        I prefer the Wema sensors.

        They cost $$, but they last.
        Pat
        Paragon
        1999 4788

        Comment


          #5
          On my 3218, the sensor is located at the far end of the tank that is closest to the fridge. There is no access panel from the master berth on our boat. I have read that removing the fridge will give you access.

          Last fall I decided that I was tired of constantly fighting the poor water condition and smell that was always present in our system. We have tried every technique ever posted here on BOC to clean the tank with little success. I removed the mattress in the master state room and then cut the monkey fur on the joint between the plywood that covered the tank. The wood was only held in place with four screws, two on the joint side and two on the side wall next to the cave.

          What I found was that the tank is approximately 10" deep, 23" wide and 90" long. It has two baffles/supports welded at 1/3rd intervals in the length of the tank. I cut three 8" holes in the top of the tank to access the three sections.

          The sensor and water pick up to the pump are located at the high end of the tank near the fridge. The location of the pick up allowed 12-15 gallons of water to remain in the tank even after the pump ran dry. The sensor arm had corroded and the float was laying in the bottom of the tank. The sides and bottom of the inside of the tank was covered with calcium crystals, slime and calcium and mineral grit. (disgusting)

          I used a putty knife and wire brush to remove as much of the crystals as possible. They had actually pitted the aluminum. Then the tank was rinsed from top to bottom and a shop vac was used to remove the water and grit from the low end of the tank. Now the tank is finally clean.

          In the spring three water tight inspection ports will be installed to seal the tank for use. I will also remove the fridge and replace the sensor.

          In the future we will no longer need to use anti freeze to winterize the system. All that will need to be done is drain the tank, water heater, blow out the water lines and vac out the remaining 12-15 gallons of water from the tank via the inspection ports. The inspection ports will also allow the inside of the the tank to be cleaned at the end of each season.

          When I complete the project this spring, I will post an in depth photo essay in "Completed Projects".

          Good luck on your project.

          Comment


            #6
            A search will come up with a few articles about the sensor. My 1994 3288 had a 4"x12" inspection plate at the foot of the aft bunk that was too small to use. Moving the fridge required removing cupboard doors so I lifted the mattress and removed a 4x6 plywood panel that covered the tank. I had to remove some teak trim to access the plywood. At the forward end of the tank is the sensor. The bobber had corroded off but the tube portion of the sender was solid. I shoved a wine cork on it and that lasted a year. The next time I used a plastic wine cork and its still going some ten years later.
            1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

            Comment


              #7
              Reed,

              I see your 32 is 1988 model. I don't want to be the bearer of bad news but there are problems with the aluminum tanks and water. I have a 1988 38xx and last summer ripped the boat apart to remove the aluminum tank which started to leak. When it was taken out there were hundreds of tiny holes under the sludge, it was toast. Also I had to cut it apart to remove it. I placed two plastic tanks coupled with a union and lost 10 gallons of capacity. If you are lucky it won't leak for a while, look for telltale water around the bottom or water in the forward bilge that keeps coming after pump out. I don't know anything about the installation of your tank in your boat, maybe someone who has had to do this repair can help. If I can be of help with plastic tanks or removal/installation please contact me.

              Richard in Wisconsin

              Comment


                #8
                Richard Tulip wrote:
                Reed,

                I see your 32 is 1988 model. I don't want to be the bearer of bad news but there are problems with the aluminum tanks and water. I have a 1988 38xx and last summer ripped the boat apart to remove the aluminum tank which started to leak. When it was taken out there were hundreds of tiny holes under the sludge, it was toast. Also I had to cut it apart to remove it. I placed two plastic tanks coupled with a union and lost 10 gallons of capacity. If you are lucky it won't leak for a while, look for telltale water around the bottom or water in the forward bilge that keeps coming after pump out. I don't know anything about the installation of your tank in your boat, maybe someone who has had to do this repair can help. If I can be of help with plastic tanks or removal/installation please contact me.

                Richard in Wisconsin
                Thanks Richard.

                I haven't noticed mine leaking------YET.

                I hope that scraping all the calcium off hasn't created a problem. Guess I'll find out this spring. If I have to replace the tank than so be it. Something had to be done because the water quality was always terrible. I'll fill it and check for leaks before I button it up.

                After removing the plywood under the mattress, the tank is very accessible. Removing it shouldn't be that hard if it comes down to it. We would probably cut it up to make it easier to handle. Having a new plastic tank actually appeals to me. It would be lighter to start with and a little less capacity would also help with weight. We rarely need seventy gallons of water and only fill the tank when we are going for long weekends away from the marina. We have never used all the water during a trip. One of the many good thing about the Chesapeake Bay is that there are hundreds of marinas. Your never very far from someplace to pull into for gas, water, food or any other supplies you may need.

                I'll post about it in the spring.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Reed,

                  My tank was 80 gallons and the pieces were about 60/40. They were not real heavy you can handle yours with two people since it is bulky it is a lot easier than cutting it up, don't ask how I know, I didn't have any choice. Go to a thread I posted in Completed Projects on 10-25-2011 called "38xx Water Tank Replacement Destruction" in it you will find details of removal (although yours sounds easier), tools, where I ordered the tanks (Plastic tank company in Texas), size and price information. This company has dozens of tanks of various gallonages and sizes, you might find one real close to your size that will fit. I would have them weld in the threaded fittings where you want them it is a first class job. Basically where they currently are unless you have to change something. Contacting them will provide the tools to tell them where.

                  I think the problem is caused by electrolysis from the guage. There is a gasket isolating the gauge from the tank but the screws go through the gasket into the tank. The 12v electrical wires are attatched to the metal disk covering the hole therefore the connection. Water, aluminum and electricity do not get along resulting in pitting and holes in the tank --- leaks. I am looking into a sensing system that uses a tape on the outside of the tank (it cannot be metal tank) another is the Weema system but it requires a hole in the tank to place the sensing rod. There have been threads on both these systems. You could put inspection ports in the tank (I don't believe there are baffles ask the question) I chose not to but redesigned the flooring over the tank that allows access through a hatch for servicing and changes in the future. This will be another thread this spring when I finish recarpeting, etc. in completed projects. A water filter system helps a lot, I have had one for some time.

                  Hope this helps

                  Richard

                  Comment


                    #10
                    If replacing an aluminum tank why not cut out the top and use the tank to hold some bladder tanks between the baffles?
                    1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

                    Comment


                      #11
                      here is what I did when I got my boat.

                      The process is really straight forward. Here are the things that will give you a bad time.

                      1. Remove the fridge as you will have a difficult time getting to the out fitting of the tank. It's on the front bottom of the tank. The my Fridge has a 12 Volt DC connection and a 110Vac plug in. Some have noted that there is a cutout for access to the top of the front portion of the tank. The cutout is not very big and some have cut more of the bulk head for better access. You can get to the tank sensor, vent and fill from the tank side. After you get the outlet disconnected it's easy to tilt the stern side of the tank up and slide it out to get to the vent, tank sensor (spade connectors) and fill.

                      2. To get to the plywood panel under the main birth. I used a carpet stairway cleaner to clean the monkey fur in the whole boat. I used hot water from the boat water heater and the heat loosened the glue of the monkey fur. I would try a heat gun if you want to loosen the monkey fur instead of cutting the corners. I peeled as much as I could without heat and just cut the corners with a utility knife. After cutting the corners there are screws on both sides of the center panel. The stb side butts against the wall of the cave. You will see the butt seam on the port side of the panel. Some of my screws were hidden under the glue. You have to remove the teak corner trim at the stern side of the bed. Under the trim and burried in the monkey fur were finishing nails nailed thru the top of the rear bulk head into the edge of the plywood panel. I just ripped mine out as I did not know those nails were there. Not a big deal as I screwed a 3/4 piece to the inside of the bulk head and screwed the plywood panel from the top when I put everything back together. My tank was held in with SS straps. I cut those and a friend had the SS straps. I don't see why the plastic straps wouldn't work. There was another plywood panel between the straps and the bottom of the tank.

                      3. I couldn't get the tank out of the boat thru the main cabin. I found easiest thing to do is to remove the ladder and the glass of the rear window. The ladder comes out by just removing the connecting screws. Since I have a hard top I didn't install the railing in back of the seats. Removing the channels of the glass is the hardest part. You have to find the end that is not tucked under a channel. Once you find that end get two putty knives and slide them on each side of the channel. That should break the glue and snap in seal of the channel. Once you get the end out of the alum channel you can pull them out with duckbill pliers. They are glued in and it takes a lot of pressure to get them out. I just pulled really hard. If they broke, I would just replace them. They are a common part from a number of suppliers. The top and bottom channels are the hardest to get out. You can try to remove the glass after removing either the top or bottom channel. I had to remove the top and bottom channel because of the order the channels were put in.

                      The connections on my tank are:

                      White hose is the water fill.

                      Clear hose (dirty in picture) is the vent hose.

                      Grey hose is the output of the tank. It goes to the bottom of the tank on the front starboard edge.

                      The black hose with the 90 degree angle is the shower pump out.

                      The other two hoses are for the red dot heater.

                      The wires for the sender and not visible and tucked to the right.

                      It's hard to see, but there are cut outs in the bulkheads so you can get to the sender on top of the water tank. It's a close fit. It was easier to hook up all the hoses with the fridge removed. I've heard of other people repairing the sender from the tank.

                      MARK THE POSITION OF THE SENDER BEFORE REMOVING. The sender is held in with screws. The holes are off set so the sender can only go in one way. That's the reason for marking the position of the sender. The holes are standard SAE pattern.

                      As far as I know there are two different types of senders. One is the with the sense unit in the tank. Seen this in fuel tanks. It consists of a coiled wire. It has a resistance of 32/35 ohms to 240 ohms. A float attached to an arm that pivots across the 32/35 to 240 ohm coil. One extreme is empty and the other is full. The other is called a Direct reading Gauge or mechanical gauge. It has a geared assembly that turns the up and down motion of the float attached to an arm to a rotation of a shaft. On top of the shaft they attach a magnet which in turn turns another magnet fixed to an indicator to show if it's empty or full. That second magnet with the indicator can be replaced or comes with an electric remote sending capsule with the 32/35 ohms to 240 ohms coil. This is what was on my tank. The float and rotational shaft was in my tank. It fell off so that was the reason my gauge did not work.

                      Other post on the BOC have said the float (cork or plastic) falls off. Some have just put on a cork from a wine bottle on the arm and have had no trouble until that falls off.

                      There are other tank sensors on the market. They use electronics by converting capacitance to indicate the level of the tanks. You glue two foil strips to the outside of the tank. A sensor with more foil is attached to the two foil strips. It is then calibrated to empty and full. No moving parts, no parts in the tank, no floats and nothing to corrode or rust. The con side is they cost a lot more and only work on thin non metal tanks. You can also use the 32 to 240 ohm sensors. There is a replacement for the 32 to 240 ohm senders for metal tanks. Instead of foil on the outside of the tank, the foil or sensor is placed inside a plastic tube. The top flange has the same hole pattern that the SAE senders have. The display comes in one, 4 or 8 places to monitor. You can check them out at http://www.ferriellosales.com/default.php and http://www.snake-river.org/Products.asp?ID=3. I'm sure there are more vendors.

                      Better yet. Since I had the tank out I cut out a 6" X 6" hole in the bulkhead at the rear of the tank. Saved the cut out and monkey fur. Attached a piano hinge to the cut out and hot glued the monkey fur back to the cut out. I also hot glued the monkey fur on the bulkhead too make it look nice. It's a tight fit, so I used a cable tie screwed to the inside of the cut out. Cut it off with about ›" showing. It's white so you don't see it unless you know it's there. I first put a piece of duct tape vertical on the back of the tank. As I filled the tank in 5 gallon increments and put a mark on the duct tape.

                      One look from the wife and she said "you not putting that tank in with out cleaning it."

                      It was pretty bad. So out it came. It wouldn't go out the stairs so went to plan B. Plan B was to remove the rear window. Off came the screws and it was really in there. So on to plan C. Plan C was to remove the glass. Slide the windows to one side and work on the other. You have to look for an end of the felt window guide that's not buried. The guides are snapped in. I used two putty knives to get the guides unsnapped at one end. It's a U channel so once you can get something under the channel. I used the shaft of a medium screw drive. Slide the screw drive and it just pops out. It's pretty tough stuff and I did not break mind, If I did I would just have to get more. You just need to remove the top and bottom guides and remove the windows. The ladder to the fly bridge has to be remove and the tank will go out the window. I would check the dimensions of the tank to the window to make sure.

                      With the tank out a couple of quarts of bleach and sloshing the tank got a good start on the gunk in the tank. Sent the wife for some pea gravel. I would say a quart of washed pea gravel and bleach in the tank sloshing around got all the gunk out. Just remember the more pea gravel you put in the more you have to get out.

                      My boat has the famous Bayliner starboard list and squat. 4 golf cart batteries and a 4D mounted mid ship at the stern makes it squat more. Because of the squat, the tank cannot be emptied. 5 or 10 gallons remain in the tank. To solve this I added about 7 feet of pex to the inside of the output fitting. I couldn't find any glue to glue the pex to the fitting. It was a pretty good dry fit. I used the clear PVC cement. It's held up for a 6 years. If it does fail, I'll be back to where I was when I got the boat. I couldn't get the curve out of the pex. Tried everything, heat gun, sunlight, bending the pex in the opposite curve. My output fitting was on the bow-starboard side of the tank. I made sure the curve was to the center and the end hitting the back starboard side of the tank. I also cut the end at an angle to prevent any blockage.

                      Reverse the order of your removal and you are all set to go.

                      I believe untreated water is what causes things to start growing in the tank. Whenever I put untreated water in the tank I drain and fill with treated water as soon as possible.

                      Have fun! If you have any question please post.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        ken1954 wrote:
                        i am hoping someone can tell me the location of the fresh water tank sensor in a 1991 3288. thanks all
                        I replaced with a WEMA sensor as mentioned by others. I don't know if my boat was modified by the previous owner, but mine was readily accessible by doing what is shown in the photo at the galley step. I'm probably forgetting the screws here and there inside the step, but that was the approach. For what it's worth, Dean


                        Comment


                          #13
                          Ken, as I understand - you want to remove & repair the fresh water sender? Mine is a '94 3288 - but your's is probably the same.I repaired my sender about 5 years ago & it's been fine since.I found an old post that had pictures & it showed the position of the sender on the top od thae tank - but the only way to get to it easily was to cut a hole in the bulkhead at the back of the master bed. Following the pictures I drilled the usual hole & then cut a square hole about 6 - 8" & there it was.I removed it & sure enough the cork on the arm had become water-logged - I removed it & replaced with a square of poly-styrene foam & a drop of glue & it's been perfect ever since.

                          [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/654749=24709-water sender2.jpg[/img]
                          Bay Seeker
                          1994 3288

                          Comment


                            #14
                            toukow wrote:
                            I replaced with a WEMA sensor as mentioned by others. I don't know if my boat was modified by the previous owner, but mine was readily accessible by doing what is shown in the photo at the galley step. I'm probably forgetting the screws here and there inside the step, but that was the approach. For what it's worth, Dean

                            I used a similar approach but there were no screws to remove so I just cut a square hole in the panel to access the sensor and then covered the hole with a piece of 1/4" teak.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I have a 1985 3870. Can anyone tell me if the fresh water or holding tank have sensors? If they do wher are they located.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X