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    3270 project

    Long list of items before we put our new (to us) 3270 back in the wet.

    First up, was to order new props since none of the metal was grounded inside the boat. The old ones were not only severely corroded but also overpropped for the engines, as mentioned in an earlier thread here:

    https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...with-twin-5-7l

    Next, we determined the shaft struts were not much better with several cracks found in one of them. Finding used seemed like a dead end too. Supposedly they can be welded but we opted to make new ones out of 304 Stainless.

    The engines had to be aligned to the shaft logs first. And speaking of shaft logs, one of them had cracks. Stay tuned...



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    Attached Files

    #2
    Ok, shaft logs. Starboard side was in great shape, but the port slide looked like something was dropped on it at some point. Cracks had worked there way through several layers and the delamination went clean through in two spots. My guess is that someone heavy stepped on it, or was careless when the engines were last out. The engines are fairly recent according to the seller (and appear fresh), but the boat didn't come with the papers to prove it. I don't think water was leaking at this location, but now is the time to fix it.

    An angle grinder was used to remove all the damaged fiberglass. unsurprisingly, more than 180 degrees of the end had to be completely removed. The trick was figuring out how to mold it correctly back to its original shape.

    To reshape the inside, I used a piece of split hose from the water tank build (More on that in a later post). I inserted it from under the boat and drove it out just far enough to provide something to glass over. the end was then secured with a hose clamp onto a socket wrench. This gave a fairly accurate mold for the inside.
    Attached Files

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      #3
      For the outside, I used some random leftover packaging plastic to wrap around once the layup was done. It worked really well, but on the first try, the top and side turned out too thin. So the next day (24h curing time) I removed the inside and outside molds, sanded with 30 grit and performed a second layup. After the second layup I made another outside mold only this time with a notch to cover more than before. Another 24h to cure and I opened it up again. This time the thickness is very close to original all the way around. Even the inside came in fairly close to original dimensions.

      A quick zip with a sawzall and it was done. I haven't tried fitting the shaft seal yet, but I now have what to sand down if I have to.

      That's all for now but there will be more updates later.
      Attached Files

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        #4
        GREAT job and thanks for the photos.
        James
        Kai Nani, Redondo Beach, CA
        1989 MY 3288
        Hino 150hp with Hurth 630A Trannies

        Comment


          #5
          Nicely documented with all the pictures, I'm sure this will help others.
          1997 Maxum 2400 SCR 5.7LX Bravo II

          Mike

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            #6
            The engines had to be aligned to the shaft logs first. And speaking of shaft logs, one of them had cracks. Stay tuned...

            You may already be aware, it is worth mentioning at least for the benefit of others that the engine / shaft alignment should be done after the boat has been in the water for a while. Some recommend twenty-four hours of float time before aligning. FWIW

            Greg
            Newport, Oregon
            South Beach Marina
            1986 3270 with twin 110 HP Hino diesels. Name of boat "Mr. Darcy"
            Past work history: Prototyping, tooling, and repair for Reinell,. General fiberglass boat repair starting in 1976.
            Also worked as heavy equipment mechanic, and machinery mechanic for over 30 years.

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              #7
              Hi Greg,

              No, I was not aware of that but thank you for the heads up. I can see how things would settle differently when the load is spread evenly across the hull compared to sitting on blocks.
              I'll keep that in mind and check it again later once its in the water.

              The basic alignment had to be done either way due to how far off things were. One spot was nearly touching the inside of the log. And considering how bad the vibration was during sea trial, I doubt the original setup was anywhere near correct. The badly eroded props didn't help either.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Nauti_Mike View Post
                Nicely documented with all the pictures, I'm sure this will help others.
                Thanks, Mike.

                That's the idea but I'm also hoping others chime in if I'm doing something that doesn't quite look right. Our last boat was a Glaspar Sefair Sedan (still have it) so this is quite the step up. I tried to do as much research on the 32xx as possible before getting into one. There is plenty of written knowledge but not many photos of invasive repair work specific to these boats. Maybe they just aren't old enough yet.

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                  #9
                  That is some very impressive work and ingenuity!
                  "Martini's Law"
                  1986 Bayliner 3270, 110 Hino's
                  Nova Scotia, Canada

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                    #10
                    Remember those old props I mentioned? Well, here's the worst one of the two. Notice how the corrosion propagates into the blades in wide layers. I am told that the pink areas are where the alloy has been stripped of some of its elements, leaving a weakened porous structure behind.

                    Next up is one of the original shaft struts. Hairline cracks actually got worse since haul out of the boat. If you look closely, you can see mineral stains leaching out simply from being left in the rain. And as with the props, you can see the different colors due to how electrolysis attacked the metal.

                    None of these parts appear to have been properly grounded, so the zincs at the transom were completely ineffective.
                    Attached Files

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                      #11
                      And here's where things start to come together. New prop, new strut. Shiny!
                      Attached Files

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                        #12
                        What do you have for motors?
                        "Martini's Law"
                        1986 Bayliner 3270, 110 Hino's
                        Nova Scotia, Canada

                        Comment


                          #13
                          5.7s gassers, unfortunately. However, we managed to score some used twin 135 Hino diesels before even finding this boat. They have about 2000 hours but look new due to a meticulous previous owner. I've already had both of them up to operating temperature while running on the pallet and both appear to purr like kittens.

                          The plan was to either use the diesels for a scratch built aluminum boat, or repower one of these older bayliners. We had our eye on one of these for a while before pulling the trigger on this one. The price difference between gas and diesel boats is so high that we could even flip the boat after it's converted to diesel. According to the logbook that came with this one, it originally had 4cyl volvo gassers. There was also a set of undersized props and evidence of the stringers being carved to make way for the 5.7s. So I'm 99% sure the 5.7s are not the original engines.

                          I don't know how easy it would be to sell the current engines if it ever came to that, but the plan is to advertise them while the boat is still on the water. That way a perspective buyer can sea-trial them first for a better sale price. You never know, we do have a strong car enthusiast community around here, so maybe a hot-rodder will want one for his project. Supposedly, they have the sought after 4-bolt main bearings.
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                            #14
                            David85,

                            Ok first I would recommend you read and understand Calders Marine Mechanical and Electrical Systems (available here:
                            https://www.amazon.com/Boatowners-Me.../dp/0071432388

                            You've just spent a few "boat bucks" on running gear. Just so you're aware stainless 304 is NOT the best choice for all gear. P.S. read the recommended book.

                            Unless you have shaft wands or other more exotic methods of connecting galvonic anodes to your shafts I would recommend shaft mounted anodes like these:

                            https://www.amazon.com/Martyr-Anodes...s=books&sr=8-1

                            Or something similar based on the the exact waters you are mooring in.

                            Just wouldn't want all of the hard earned dollars that went into those gleaming bronze or nickle/bronze to be "burned up" due to a poorly designed or implemented bonding system.

                            Regards,

                            RB Cooper

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Hi Cooper,

                              I haven't seen that book before, but it's available on Scribed, so I have a PDF copy now. Thanks for the tip.

                              This article gave me some of the basics in case anyone else wants a primer on grounding issues (though I'm still by no means an expert):
                              https://stevedmarineconsulting.com/b...on-prevention/

                              I discussed shaft and skeg anodes with a local propeller guy who was in the business for many years. He cautioned me that they can let go and strike the prop if you aren't meticulous with frequent haul-outs. He preferred the grounding brush method. It seemed like a better design so I attempted to order some. I thought I had a nice system on the way but the vendor contacted me after the fact to say they were sold out and didn't know when more would be coming in. They asked me to cancel the order, so I did.

                              The same prop guy also advised using a grounding bus to tie all the metal to a common anode. Daisy chaining wires was a no-no. There is evidence of interior grounding in the boat once upon a time, but only the wire crimp ends remain. The wires themselves were ripped out at some point, with the resulting damage plain for us to see now. The large transom mounted anode is nearly untouched since it wasn't connected to anything.

                              As for 304 alloy, if we start to see major corrosion by the time of our next haul-out, then we can revisit the CAD files and attempt to CNC them out of 316 next time. 95% of the work was done in-house, so the cost wasn't all that high. The only part we couldn't do was turn them on a lathe once welded up. But by next year I'll have my own lathe up and running. I'm still waiting on a VFD to arrive.

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