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Furnace Thermostat Location 38xx

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    Furnace Thermostat Location 38xx

    I'm up to that point in my hot air furnace replacement/installation where I'm thinking the current location isn't all that good for the new installation. The current location is next to the refrigerator above the stairs. My installation plan has a 3" salon vent at the front corner of the bat facing the dinette, a 3" vent on the steps facing sink, a 2.5" vent in the guest stateroom and a 2.5" vent in the master stateroom. I'm thinking having the thermostat 4' above and a couple of feet over may not be close to optimal but other than moving it along that bulkhead, where else are they generally mounted?
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
    MMSI 367770440
    1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
    Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

    #2
    Typically on a home unit the thermostat is mounted at the air return. The idea being you want to measure the temp of the air going back into the system not what's coming out of the system.
    Future 4788 Owner
    Charleston, S.C.

    Comment


      #3
      I have mine mounted on the side bulkhead for the frig. at the top of the steps.
      It has been there for 18 years, works great.
      I have a Wabasto 45,000 btu hot water heating system
      You do not want the thermostat near the heater vent.
      I have heat on the stb. side just fwd of the aft bulkhead, at the bottom of the steps for the galley,
      under the steps feeding the port stateroom and feeding the hall head, as well as one in the master.
      Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

      Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
      Twin 350 GM power
      Located in Seward, AK
      Retired marine surveyor

      Comment


        #4
        Sportscar, measuring the temp in a above average warm spot is exactly what I'm trying to avoid. I think by moving the thermostat to the helm end of the stairs like boatworkfl has is a good solution. I was looking at that site already but want some validation from other owners. Presently, I'm going to get my circulation air from outside partly because the air here is usually over 25f if we are out in the boat at all.
        P/C Pete
        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
        1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
        MMSI 367770440
        1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
        Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

        Comment


          #5
          My disclaimer here, I am going to be installing a webasto but when I do I might not follow my own advice here. I would think more important than thermostat location may be even circulation so that temperature variations are minimized. If done well it might not matter so much where the thermostat is located as long as it isn't near a non heat system related heat source. All things being equal one will eventually learn what temperature to set the thing at to arrive at being mostly comfortable. For example the thermostat for my reverse cycle system is located directly over a vent. In the summer I have to set the temperature low and come to think of it in the winter I also have to set it low. The RC system has a very wide temperature swing of about 4 degrees so we sit there alternating between a little too warm and a little too cold, our heads usually a little warm and our feet a little cold. I am hoping the hydronic system thermostat will have a much narrower band and much more even temperatures throughout. I'm not big on routing wires and hoses through difficult areas though and that is why the disclaimer. I'll probably address any short comings with a small circulation fan here or there.
          Tony Bacon,
          Washougal, WA
          Caspian
          1997 3788 Twin Cummins 250hp

          Comment


            #6
            First of all, I highly recommend a digital thermostat. Not only can you set the exact temperature, but you can also set the deviation from the set point .

            Second, a thermostat should should be fairly close to the air return. As sportscar mentioned, you want to measure the temperature of the air returning to the furnace .

            Third, if possible add some outside air to the return. This will keep the moisture down inside the boat. You can use an adjustable Y on the return duct to regulate the fresh/return mix.

            Sure Marine in Seattle have everything needed plus they can provide expert advice .
            1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
            2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
            Anacortes, WA

            Comment


              #7
              My thermostat is located above the fridge opposite of the downhelm wheel. I’d say it’s an okay location for daily activities - eating, cooking, watching TV, etc. However, the berths are quite a bit cooler due to the height of the thermostat. This temperature variation can somewhat be compensated for by partially closing down the settee vent thereby sending additional heat to the lower portions of the boat.
              Jim Gandee
              1989 3888
              Hino 175's
              Fire Escape
              Fyrflyer@ca.rr.com

              Comment


                #8
                Mine is beside my bunk so I can have it off at night and put it on without getting up into a cold space.
                1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Uncle_Bob View Post
                  Mine is beside my bunk so I can have it off at night and put it on without getting up into a cold space.
                  What he ^^^^^ said.

                  Different boat altogether but we had our Webasto thermostat located in the master stateroom because that was the location where temperature control was most important. Its a boat guys - the whole notion of optimal location based on air flow and air return is bogus. Boats leak air and heat - they're not houses and the rules that apply on land don't exist on the water.

                  Wherever you put the thermostat there are going to be hot and cold spots onboard. Locate the thermostat wherever even temperature control is most important to you.
                  R.J.(Bob) Evans
                  Buchanan, SK
                  Cierra 2755
                  Previously 43 Defever, Response LX
                  Various runabouts, canoes & kayaks

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by bobofthenorth View Post
                    Its a boat guys - the whole notion of optimal location based on air flow and air return is bogus. Boats leak air and heat - they're not houses and the rules that apply on land don't exist on the water.

                    Wherever you put the thermostat there are going to be hot and cold spots onboard. Locate the thermostat wherever even temperature control is most important to you.
                    Houses are no different; they leak and they have cold spots. I prefer to deal with this by balancing the system using the correct duct diameters, vent placement, dampers, etc. This way hot and cold spots are minimized.

                    Incidentally, on an existing system a good solution is to install two thermostats, one in the salon and one in a stateroom. A multi-pole switch to control which thermostats is in use also needs to be installed.

                    1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                    2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                    Anacortes, WA

                    Comment

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