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    3288 Hino coolant drain plug


    My coolant drain plug on my starboard engine Is Corroded to the point where I cannot loosen it to drain the antifreeze. Does anybody have any suggestions on a different way to drain the antifreeze
    Without using the Drain plug? Does anybody have any ideas On how to get the drain plug out? As you know that location is very tight and hard to get at.

    I have tried various wrenching devices Including vice grips to The point where the Plug wrenching area is in pretty bad shape.

    Any ideas would be greatly appreciated

    Thanks,
    Chuck


    #2
    Hi Chuck
    Might try a little Heat
    Brad & Sharon
    Lady Jake
    1985 4550 EH 700TI /Twin Disc 502
    LaConner,Wa. (summer)
    2003 Scout CC 24' W/225 Yamaha
    kailua Kona,Hi (Winter)

    Comment


      #3

      I've tried heat No avail. Are used map gas Which is a lot hotter Then Propane or butane

      I have tried penetrating Oil, liquid wrench type stuff but More sophisticated.

      I'm considering taking the alternator Mount off So I can Remove the plug In my shop on a workbench,
      But I hate to go through all that trouble if there's another way of getting the antifreeze out.



      Looking for clever ideas guys.

      Thanks
      Chuck767


      Comment


        #4
        Chuck767,
        Removing the alternator bracket is a PIA but probably best in the long run. I have had to do just that x2. It is not a pleasant or an easy way but once you get the old plug out, the threads can be cleaned up so they are nice and smooth. Use marine anti-seize on the new plug (from North Harbor Marine is where I got mine). Order 3 plugs. They are a little spendy for what they are, but there are no guarantees you won't need another sometime in the future. It would be terrible to need one and find out they are not available until enough orders for another production run. Get the new "o"rings for the plugs and for the bracket too.

        Greg
        Newport, Oregon
        South Beach Marina
        1986 3270 with twin 110 HP Hino diesels. Name of boat "Mr. Darcy"
        Past work history: Prototyping, tooling, and repair for Reinell,. General fiberglass boat repair starting in 1976.
        Also worked as heavy equipment mechanic, and machinery mechanic for over 30 years.

        Comment


          #5
          After stripping the bolt head on the coolant plug I had to use a bolt extractor to remove it. On the starboard side I was more careful and used a 6 point impact socket and 24" breaker bar to slowly back it out. The plug was difficult to turn the whole way out. I used penetrating oil but no heat. On the port side I was worried about my body getting stuck between the two engines after starting a fire with a torch.

          The original plug is bronze(?) but the replacement is aluminum. The plugs have o-rings that sometimes don't come out with the plug and have to be picked out. In the past I thought there was no o-ring because the rings didn't come out and it was so hard to see inside the plug hole. I used anti-seize when installing the plugs.
          George
          "Delphin"
          '89 3270, 135 HP Hinos
          Victoria, BC
          Member:
          Capital City Yacht Club
          Oak Bay Power & Sail Squadron

          Comment


            #6
            Gsilvest

            what style of bolt extractor did you use?

            chuck

            Comment


              #7
              I gave up on my starboard drain plug and pumped out the fluid through the hose attached to the turbo charger. Earl the Hino expert told me about doing it that way. I do not think I got all of it however. But close to it. I was thinking after it might be possible to pump it out through the heater line or hot water tank line can't remember which one the starboard engine feeds. I do not know if starting the engine will actually pump it out without causing damage.I thought I read a thread where someone did something like that but using a shop vac.
              1987 3270 135-Hino
              Foxtrap, Newfoundland

              Comment


              • chuck767
                chuck767 commented
                Editing a comment
                Well, Earl is the expert. I will give that a try.
                If you don’t get all of the antifreeze out, you could refill with water and suck it out again to dilute anything remains behind
                Thanks,
                Chuck

              #8
              This is a post in the thread I was referring to from Uncle_Bob

              04-28-2014, 06:02 PM


              You don't need to run the engine to pump it out. Warm it up so the thermostat is open and loosen the lowest coolant hose. Shove on the end of a wet/dry shop vac and suck out the coolant. You'll have to empty the vac a few times so have empty containers ready.

              1987 3270 135-Hino
              Foxtrap, Newfoundland

              Comment


                #9
                Originally posted by chuck767 View Post
                Gsilvest

                what style of bolt extractor did you use?

                chuck
                I don't know what style of extractor he used, but I can tell you that Craftsman offers a bolt extractor kit that is reasonably priced and I have had good success with it.

                Greg
                Newport, Oregon
                South Beach Marina
                1986 3270 with twin 110 HP Hino diesels. Name of boat "Mr. Darcy"
                Past work history: Prototyping, tooling, and repair for Reinell,. General fiberglass boat repair starting in 1976.
                Also worked as heavy equipment mechanic, and machinery mechanic for over 30 years.

                Comment


                  #10
                  Originally posted by gsilvest View Post
                  After stripping the bolt head on the coolant plug I had to use a bolt extractor to remove it. On the starboard side I was more careful and used a 6 point impact socket and 24" breaker bar to slowly back it out. The plug was difficult to turn the whole way out. I used penetrating oil but no heat. On the port side I was worried about my body getting stuck between the two engines after starting a fire with a torch.

                  The original plug is bronze(?) but the replacement is aluminum. The plugs have o-rings that sometimes don't come out with the plug and have to be picked out. In the past I thought there was no o-ring because the rings didn't come out and it was so hard to see inside the plug hole. I used anti-seize when installing the plugs.
                  Do the new ones require an “o-ring”?
                  James
                  Kai Nani, Redondo Beach
                  1989 MY 3288
                  Hino 135hp with Hurth 630A Trannies

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by chuck767 View Post
                    Gsilvest

                    what style of bolt extractor did you use?

                    chuck
                    Irwin 9/16” & 14 mm extractor socket.

                    George
                    "Delphin"
                    '89 3270, 135 HP Hinos
                    Victoria, BC
                    Member:
                    Capital City Yacht Club
                    Oak Bay Power & Sail Squadron

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Originally posted by IslandHop View Post

                      Do the new ones require an “o-ring”?
                      Yes, they require o-rings which are sold separately from the plugs. See invoice. Canadian $.
                      George
                      "Delphin"
                      '89 3270, 135 HP Hinos
                      Victoria, BC
                      Member:
                      Capital City Yacht Club
                      Oak Bay Power & Sail Squadron

                      Comment


                        #13
                        Originally posted by Mr._Darcy View Post
                        Chuck767,
                        Removing the alternator bracket is a PIA but probably best in the long run. I have had to do just that x2. It is not a pleasant or an easy way but once you get the old plug out, the threads can be cleaned up so they are nice and smooth. Use marine anti-seize on the new plug (from North Harbor Marine is where I got mine). Order 3 plugs. They are a little spendy for what they are, but there are no guarantees you won't need another sometime in the future. It would be terrible to need one and find out they are not available until enough orders for another production run. Get the new "o"rings for the plugs and for the bracket too.

                        Greg

                        I did what Mr.Darcy has described. As the bracket is filled with coolant, you will not be able to get it hot enough to be of any value in getting the plugs out. I think I posted my process on this job but the pictures were lost in the conversion. The new plugs are aluminum vs the original brass. The new o-ring creates the seal so they only need to be snug.

                        good luck.

                        "Martini's Law"
                        1986 Bayliner 3270, 110 Hino's
                        Nova Scotia, Canada

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Would it be possible to repost the pics, I think I might tackle this job next spring.
                          1987 3270 135-Hino
                          Foxtrap, Newfoundland

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Originally posted by colbournee View Post
                            Would it be possible to repost the pics, I think I might tackle this job next spring.
                            unfortunately I don't have the pics. I'll try and find my post.

                            Here its is:
                            https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...lp-gctid719353

                            it wasn't that bad of a job. I put a pan under the bracket and once the coolant started to come out I had a friend suck it out of the pan with a shop vac.
                            "Martini's Law"
                            1986 Bayliner 3270, 110 Hino's
                            Nova Scotia, Canada

                            Comment

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