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Fuel Tank Platform Question

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    Fuel Tank Platform Question

    I was goofing around the engine room today on my 3288 and started looking at the fuel tanks and the platforms they rest on. Is it only the bilge painted plywood boxes supporting the tanks, or is there a more solid platform/base in addition to the boxes underneath the tank providing support?
    "FOG 1"
    1989 Bayliner 3288
    Twin 305s
    Kenmore, WA

    #2
    No, that is it, just the fiberglassed plywood.
    Jim
    1988 3270 With 135 Hinos

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    #3
    I have been looking up information on the fuel tank platforms (also called bunks, boxes, fuel tank saddles). I have found lots of older posts discussing the subject, but the photos did not transfer over to the new site. Does anyone know if it is possible to repair/support these without removing the fuel tanks? I was thinking it may be possible to use a jack to support the tank and rebuild with UHMW sheets. Thoughts, pictures, or ideas would be great!
    "FOG 1"
    1989 Bayliner 3288
    Twin 305s
    Kenmore, WA

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      #4
      I took the right tank out last year and I doubt there is enough room to raise the tank to repair the bunk. There was like an inch clearane to get the tank out. Another question would be why is the repair needed? If it is rot from water, the tank could be compromised from the same water.
      Jim
      1988 3270 With 135 Hinos

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        #5
        Thanks for the response. When I was down in the engine room last weekend, I noticed that the starboard tank bunk was starting to crack in the aft area adjacent to the fuel tank. It is only in one spot, but I know that this could spread to where the tank is actually supported and cause the tank to be compromised. It's a preemptive measure! I am planning on cleaning up that area, but I like to do things right the first time and save myself a headache later! Here is a picture that shows the spot I am talking about.

        Click image for larger version

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        "FOG 1"
        1989 Bayliner 3288
        Twin 305s
        Kenmore, WA

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          #6
          Good. I was afraid of the water rotting the tank. I took the nuffler off and it made access a lot easier.
          Jim
          1988 3270 With 135 Hinos

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            #7
            Sorry, forgot. If you take the muffler off and the boat is in the water, make sure to leave the aft hose on. Otherwise water pours in that 4 inch hole in the transome. Almost lost the boat,
            Jim
            1988 3270 With 135 Hinos

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              #8
              Originally posted by Wild_Blue_Yonder View Post
              Sorry, forgot. If you take the muffler off and the boat is in the water, make sure to leave the aft hose on. Otherwise water pours in that 4 inch hole in the transome. Almost lost the boat,
              Jim
              Remove the exhaust flap and use se a rubber plumbers cap with a hose clamp on the exhaust pipe on the outside to prevent water from pouring in.
              I do this during winter lay-up and a muffler change.

              One of the things that promotes rot under an aluminum fuel tank is that the bottom sits on the gel coated base, the tank should sit on poly strips that have a sealant on them with 100 % coverage, otherwise salt will get under and rot the tanks.
              On new boats no aluminum fuel tanks are allowed.
              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
              Twin 350 GM power
              Located in Seward, AK
              Retired marine surveyor

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