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    SF to the PNW

    We are planning on running our 47 from San Francisco to Puget Sound this summer/fall. I’ve been gathering research and prepping the boat. Any wise words or experiences to share?
    2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
    12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
    MV Kia Orana
    Currently Alameda CA

    #2
    Hi Steve,
    In no particular order: are you planning on harbor hopping or staying out? The crab pots can be numerous and difficult to see in all but the calmest water and impossible at night. If you’re staying out, suggest you stay way out. If harbor hopping I like to be on the water at first light but be ready for heavy fog in the am, working radar a must. I always call ahead to the various harbors to get the local info, especially if you have to cross a bar. Believe it or not some harbors, like Morro Bay, don’t have much in the way of available slips for transients. It’s best to have some sort of reservation if at all possible. Fuel is another issue, availability, times and what kind of dock they have. Some harbors only have commercial fuel docks, nothing but vertical pilings to tie to, a fender board comes in handy here. How many in your crew? Working A/P sure makes life easier. Plenty of spare filters and a two gallon jug of diesel to prime new filters. Make or purchase lunch (sandwiches or whatever) the night before so no one has to struggle in the galley underway. The weather/seas...tons of websites besides NOAA I like windy.com. Safety items: radios, life vests, life raft (rentable) extra anchor/rode and a sea anchor can be a life saver if you have a duel engine failure (read bad fuel or clogged filters). Don’t forget to have fun!


    Jim Gandee
    1989 3888
    Hino 175's
    Fire Escape
    Fyrflyer@ca.rr.com

    Comment


      #3
      Hi Jim,
      Good thoughts! Thank you!

      We are planning on fair weather, harbor hopping all the way up. I suppose if weather was completely benign we might over night outside the crab pots but I doubt it. Years ago I did one overnight passage sailing in the Caribbean it was fun but totally different situation.

      We have no set time table. If we have to wait a week or two for good weather, so be it. Maybe we will get antsy if we go too slow. Planning on my wife and I for crew. She is nervous. I want it to not scare the crap out of her (or me for that matter). We are going to do a couple of 50-100 mile round trip coastal hops this spring to get a feel for it. If it’s fun for her, great! If not so much.... you are on the crew list!

      I got a bought a copy of a dated but detailed book and planning map called Exploring the Pacific Coast. The map shows a “crab fee” lane. I’ll be checking into that for sure!

      I have taken care of the safety items you list but the sea anchor. I will look into that. Thinking about the conditions that would require that.... I would need to rig up jack lines and a harnesses just to deploy/retrieve it. Hmmmm....
      2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
      12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
      MV Kia Orana
      Currently Alameda CA

      Comment


        #4
        You have the perfect plan, which is a no timetable plan.

        The best advice I can give is to plan on being in port by early afternoon each travel day. We all know that sea breezes pick up as the sun heats things up, and that it is generally much calmer in the early mornings.

        We also know that it is MUCH funnner leaving a port in the dark than it is coming into a strange port in the dark.
        WE also know thast it is much funner gliding along in the smooth waters of the morning than bouncing around in the blustery afternoon seas.,

        KEVIN SANDERS
        4788 LISAS WAY
        SEWARD, ALASKA

        Comment


          #5
          Agree with KS, no time table is essential and he’s spot on with weather patterns & arriving in daylight. Be prepared to wait a few days for perfect weather. Crew of 3 is minimum. I’ve run from Portland to Anacrotes, both way several times. With 3 we run 2 hrs on helm, 2 hours on watch, 2 hours sleep. If you wife isn’t or dosen’t want to helm, another person is recommended. Take lots of snacks, not in the fridge. We have hit unexpected bad weather a couple of times and it was too rough to open the packed fridge. Once for 17 hours!! If boat has not been in rough water much take a box of fuel filters, constant pounding will stir up the crap in a tank and clog filters constantly. Take care packing everything, plates, glasses anything that can fly around will.
          Take seasick precautions, we use wrist bands, Dramamine & raw ginger. You can get prescription drugs, Scopalamine is one, but take care its a very toxic drug, was used by Brit army for integrations. Very scary drug, depends how you react to it-maybe try it on dry land before you go;-) As others said, following the 300’ contour or close, you’ll come across hundreds of crab pots, not easy to see even in a light swell, depending on the light. Never heared of a crab free lane, that would be great. Watch for dead heads and large logs, PNW & N. CA has a big logging industry and many seem never destined for lumber! Not to scare your wife-or you, but you can rent life rafts and or Gumby suits-just in case. We also carried big bolt cutters to release the dinghy quickly, again just in case. Other than unexpected rough weather, bad wave angles and fetch, we never had any real scares over the years. First boat was a 48’GB, second a 60’ Marlow. Plan, plan, plan, wait wait when necessary. You’ll be surprised how much cell service you get when you get to OR & WA, (can’t speak to CA) can’t rely on it, but lots of coverage as you come up the coast. Enjoy, you’ll have tails to entertain your nautical friends for years. One thing to add, we use every weather program we can find, NOAA, et al. One newer App is Predict wind and its been quite good, but as you know none are perfect with the unpredicatbale Pacific.
          Machog.
          1996 4087 Lazy Days
          2007 Walker Bay Genesis Lazy Mac
          2011 Porsche Cayman
          2010 Lexus IS 250C
          2008 Honda Ridgeline

          Comment


            #6
            Spur line cutters might be handy https://www.spursmarine.com/
            I've done the Vancouver to San Diego run in a 50 footer in July. Most fog was off S.F. and most seas were large rollers from the northwest. We ran following the 350 foot curve which was about 12 miles out. Any bar crossing is worth a call to coast guard. Skipper and wife is a lean crew. Even a little sea sickness will have a bad effect with that lean of a crew.
            1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

            Comment


              #7
              For daily harbor hopping I believe a two person crew is doable if the crew members are experienced and capable of handling the boat solo. Seasickness can render any crew member ineffective at any time, including the skipper.
              Jim Gandee
              1989 3888
              Hino 175's
              Fire Escape
              Fyrflyer@ca.rr.com

              Comment


                #8
                Strongly suggest an EPRIB in the safety equipment.
                David
                Sidney, B.C.
                MV Cassiopeia V
                1990 4588
                twin 250 hp Hinos
                8kw Westerbeke

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Chart-table View Post
                  Strongly suggest an EPRIB in the safety equipment.
                  And an inspected life raft.
                  Started boating 1965
                  Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Jim_Gandee View Post
                    For daily harbor hopping I believe a two person crew is doable if the crew members are experienced and capable of handling the boat solo. Seasickness can render any crew member ineffective at any time, including the skipper.
                    Agreed

                    There is no difference between a husband and wife taking their boat out for a three of four day jaunt and taking the same boat and same husband and wife team out on a three to four month, or a three to four year jaunt. It is still harbor hopping...one day at a time.

                    My wife and I take our boat out for a week at a time now, and I cannot think why that could not be extended to a month, or a year.

                    KEVIN SANDERS
                    4788 LISAS WAY
                    SEWARD, ALASKA

                    Comment


                      #11
                      When I did it, I was walking the dock asking about a life raft and a seasoned old salt said, "Ya gotta be kiddin, Your boat is no bigger than a life raft."
                      1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

                      Comment


                        #12
                        This is a must...

                        Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
                        Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
                        93 3058 sold
                        92 2855 (day boat)
                        91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
                        Longbranch WA
                        Life is Good

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Uncle_Bob View Post
                          When I did it, I was walking the dock asking about a life raft and a seasoned old salt said, "Ya gotta be kiddin, Your boat is no bigger than a life raft."
                          I suppose everyone’s idea of safety is subjective. The chances of needing a life raft are small but you’re betting your life you won’t. Given the water temp from N. Ca to Seattle one wouldn’t last very long should the unthinkable happen to the mother ship.
                          Jim Gandee
                          1989 3888
                          Hino 175's
                          Fire Escape
                          Fyrflyer@ca.rr.com

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I'd suggest getting your fuel polished before the trip. Being offshore can stir up stuff in your fuel tank that can plug filters in the most inconvenient time. It's money well spent

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Ruffryder View Post
                              This is a must...

                              these are great!
                              If you don't want to scare your wife then don't take her, this is not a trip for the faint of heart or people who get sea sick
                              If I was you I would listen and take notes from Kevin Sanders, he has made many trips from Seattle to Seward Ak on Bayliners. I for one would not wanted to be on his last trip across the North Gulf of Alaska, Scare your wife to bad and you will need a new boating partner
                              1988 3270
                              135 hinos
                              Seldovia ALASKA
                              KEVINS UPHOLSTERY
                              KEVINSBOATTOPS.COM
                              Marine canvas/Upholstery
                              since 1975

                              Comment

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