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    Dryboat.com...? Hull Repair...

    Apparently this company successfully repairs delam issues, hulls, cabin tops and a whole host of other evils.

    Any of you ever use them...?

    More importantly, have any of you had this used to repair the cabin top...?

    Thank you in advance...Nick
    1988 3888 "Liberty"
    Twin Cummins 6BT's 210hp
    Onan 8.0
    Boating Raritan Bay

    #2
    I have not heard of this Co. but lets start with your boat and what problems are you having?
    Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
    96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

    Comment


      #3
      It sounds like they use vacuum lines to remove water, not sure how well that would work, then there is the issue of re-bonding the core to the fiberglass laminate.
      If not perfectly dry fiberglass resin will not work, I do not know about epoxy.
      On a flybridge I would remove the top and core and re-core it with high density closed cell foam and re-laminate it and then add non skid to the gelcoat or bond some pre made non skid sheeting to the top of the laminate.
      If the boat hull is cored is another story.
      If you do not own this boat walk away.
      The cost can be quite high.
      Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

      Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
      Twin 350 GM power
      Located in Seward, AK
      Retired marine surveyor

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by fritzman View Post
        I have not heard of this Co. but lets start with your boat and what problems are you having?
        The problem is high moisture in the foredeck...center panel just forward of the window, under the windlass and port walkway (about half of it). Total about 25 sqft.
        1988 3888 "Liberty"
        Twin Cummins 6BT's 210hp
        Onan 8.0
        Boating Raritan Bay

        Comment


          #5
          UPDATE: I contacted the company and asked about the process...

          Dryboat does not repair...they only remove the moisture from the affected area. They drill holes in the appropriate area, presumably as non-invasive as possible, then stick hoses in the holes and BLOW dry air into the affected area. This dries the affected area and may take several days. (In their words, they reverse the moisture process) The drilled holes are then filled with epoxy. The affected area is NOT repaired but only dried. They also do not do any of the finish work, for example, if they need to drill into the gelcoat. A separate finish job would be required.

          According to them this process has worked for boats for the last 13 years and they have a heavy relationship with Meridian and SeaRay. I called Bayliner product support and they are not aware of Dryboat. This process has been used in the worst of places...stringers that would otherwise have required complete dismantling and hull sides where they drill from underneath and straight up the hull side core. And no, I don't work for them nor have I used them. I am just doing the research because they have been offered as the solution to the high moisture in several places on my prospective purchase.

          I was hoping one or more of you might have used them.
          1988 3888 "Liberty"
          Twin Cummins 6BT's 210hp
          Onan 8.0
          Boating Raritan Bay

          Comment


            #6
            There is a machine known as a hot vac. The way it dries the core is applying heat (via a large pad) and vacuum simultaneously both of which contribute to vaporizing the water. Vapor is easier to extract than fluid. There are maybe a half dozen yards in the US that have the hot-vac machine. One is The Yard at Rocky Pointe where Caspian is currently undergoing transom core replacement. I had hoped they could dry the core. They way it was described to me there are three categories a wet core falls under, can be successfully dried, can't be successfully dried and all points between. The determination of where you fall on the spectrum is determined with core samples. In my case I landed in the somewhere in between. I could have gone ahead with the drying and resealing of the transom and crossed my fingers that it would still be dry a few years down the road. In my case the difference in cost was a factor of 2, $6k to dry and $12k to replace. I opted for replace because I value the piece of mind by about that much.
            Tony Bacon,
            Washougal, WA
            Caspian
            1997 3788 Twin Cummins 250hp

            Comment


              #7
              Tony...I certainly would think the same way. Thank you for the heads up on the hot-vac...

              Right now the buyer is waiting for a quote from Dryboat. Once received, I'll be able to make a smarter rather than emotional decision. Fact is, I don't want to walk away from the boat but I'm not sure what it would cost to replace the foredeck up to and including the windlass area and if the owner is willing to do that (or if that is even possible). I'm in solution mode and would rather come up with one where the sting is the least possible for both of us.
              1988 3888 "Liberty"
              Twin Cummins 6BT's 210hp
              Onan 8.0
              Boating Raritan Bay

              Comment


                #8
                I’ve seen some sales YouTubes of the process and found it interesting but wasn’t sure how they restored the reinforcement. My flybridge bedeck had the plywood replaced from the inside up in Edmonds, WA, and I gottta say they did a great looking job. Any process is going to be major surgery so have some with a good local reputation do the work.
                P/C Pete
                Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
                MMSI 367770440
                1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
                Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

                Comment


                • builderdude
                  builderdude commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Not sure what boat op is looking at but if I were faced with a repair like this I'd also do it from inside/underside.

                #9
                Personally, I agree, dude. They replaced the headliner in the salon along the way and the only real hint is a drip or two of resin in the salon.
                P/C Pete
                Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
                MMSI 367770440
                1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
                Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

                Comment


                  #10
                  I tend to agree with Boatworker that unless you can steal the boat walk away, any moister in to the core will delaminate parts of the structure, so it will need to be opened up and re laminated with closed cell foam.
                  Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
                  96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    As I mentioned there are degrees of wet core. The core isn't always structurally compromised. When it hasn't been compromised drying is a reasonable repair method.
                    Tony Bacon,
                    Washougal, WA
                    Caspian
                    1997 3788 Twin Cummins 250hp

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Thank you, all...really appreciate your feedback.

                      Looks like it will likely be opened up, core replaced, resurfaced...

                      I think I will be happier with this rather than just drying it out.

                      Surveyor believes the window, hardware and portals are the culprits...I suspect some close inspection and TLC will also prevent/minimize future damage. By the same token, it's taken 30 years to get in the condition it's in now... By then, I don't think I'll be able to make the trip to the flybridge

                      So the closing is delayed a bit until this gets straightened out...

                      Take deep breaths, Nick...

                      Thank you again...
                      1988 3888 "Liberty"
                      Twin Cummins 6BT's 210hp
                      Onan 8.0
                      Boating Raritan Bay

                      Comment


                        #13
                        Tony, What was the issue with your transom? What was the root cause? Just wondering what we should be watching out for.
                        Guntar
                        1999 3988
                        Cummins 270s

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Water intruded into the core through the fitting bolt holes. Bayliner used sealant on the bolts but didn't encapsulate the core material. To make matters worse they overtightened the fasteners drawing the nuts into the GRP particularly around the rudder assemblies which I believe weakened the seal.
                          Tony Bacon,
                          Washougal, WA
                          Caspian
                          1997 3788 Twin Cummins 250hp

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Dang it. I think I will have this checked at next haul out. Thanks for the heads up.
                            Guntar
                            1999 3988
                            Cummins 270s

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