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Fiberglass advise; 1997 Bayliner 3988

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    Fiberglass advise; 1997 Bayliner 3988

    The captain wants a second helm seat facing forward on the upper helm. I know nothing about fiberglass but do have questions-
    1- How thick is the flooring of the upper helm?
    2- Pending the answer to #1, would anybody trust 3/8" nut certs to attach 3/4" plywood and the new pedestal?
    OR
    3- Do I need to remove the salon ceiling vinyl for thru hole backing?

    Some vessels have raised plywood (double helm pic) but I can't tell if the plywood is thru hole with backing.
    Some vessels have no plywood (twin seats pic) with pedestal only; also can't tell if thru hole backing.

    Any feed back will be appreciated.
    Double helm Twin seats
    1997 Bayliner 3988

    #2
    We went through the same thing and decided not to drill holes. Instead we got a second helm seat with a pedestal similar to this one. It works on all but the roughest conditions.


    Click image for larger version

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    1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
    2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
    Anacortes, WA

    Comment


    • scubadiver535
      scubadiver535 commented
      Editing a comment
      Do you remember where you obtained that pedestal?

    #3
    the floor of the flybridge should be layed up with either 5/8 or 3/4 plywood as the core. depending on the footprint of the seat pedestal, a backer may not be needed.... its common for helm seats with a 10-12" round pedestal base to be attached with #10 screws directly thru the gelcoat into the plywood, with no backer... 8 to 10 screws is the usual number used.

    a smaller pedestal base, or a tall pedestal will need more strength to hold it, so either more screws, or bolts with a backer...

    and I would never use nut-serts on a boat.... its a bad idea because a bit of corrosion or salt intrusion into the threads, and if the bolts ever need to be removed, the inserts will spin and make a mess of it all... screws or thru bolts only...


    NU LIBERTE'
    Salem, OR

    1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
    5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
    N2K equipped throughout..
    2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
    2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
    '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
    Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

    Comment


    • scubadiver535
      scubadiver535 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for the heads up. I was considering 5200 also.

    #4
    Originally posted by scubadiver535 View Post
    Any feed back will be appreciated.
    5200 shouldnt be used. it cant be trusted to hold the pedestal base by itself (nor should it be expected to), and if you ever need to remove the base, the 5200 will be a real problem. 4000 will offer everything desired in that application.,



    NU LIBERTE'
    Salem, OR

    1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
    5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
    N2K equipped throughout..
    2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
    2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
    '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
    Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

    Comment


      #5
      Without knowing for a certainty what the core is this is a difficult question to answer. Centerline2 suggest it may be plywood. Many of the larger Bayliners in the motor yacht series used 1.5 inch balsa core for the flybridge deck. It is found in the 32xx, and 38xx that I know of. Not sure what other Baylinr motor yachts use balsa core as well. The actual core used is critical to answering this question.

      Greg
      Newport, Oregon
      South Beach Marina
      1986 3270 with twin 110 HP Hino diesels. Name of boat "Mr. Darcy"
      Past work history: Prototyping, tooling, and repair for Reinell,. General fiberglass boat repair starting in 1976.
      Also worked as heavy equipment mechanic, and machinery mechanic for over 30 years.

      Comment


        #6
        Originally posted by Mr._Darcy View Post
        Without knowing for a certainty what the core is this is a difficult question to answer. Centerline2 suggest it may be plywood. Many of the larger Bayliners in the motor yacht series used 1.5 inch balsa core for the flybridge deck. It is found in the 32xx, and 38xx that I know of. Not sure what other Baylinr motor yachts use balsa core as well. The actual core used is critical to answering this question.

        Greg
        the glass layup in the area of that boat where a second helm seat pedistal would be attached, should be plenty thick enough to hold screws by itself... the thickness of the core should really only matter to the length of the screws.
        but when the layup thickness is questionable, i pre drill the holes (to the proper size for the screws) and inject epoxy, and let it set for a few days before installing the screws. this gives the core a lot better holding power, integrated with the skin thickness... this method should work with any type of core material.


        NU LIBERTE'
        Salem, OR

        1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
        5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
        N2K equipped throughout..
        2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
        2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
        '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
        Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

        Comment

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