Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

RIB on a 4788

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    RIB on a 4788

    Does a 12' rigid Inflatable fit sideways on the upper deck of a 4788 without having the leg of the outboard hanging out past the hull.
    How about lenght ways storage?
    Stan
    2001 Bayliner 4788
    Underhulls
    Bow & Stern Thrusters
    Hydronic heater
    330 Cummins

    #2
    I’m not sure about sideways but it will fit lengthwise. We had a 4m (13+ ft) Novurania dinghy on our 4788. The motor hung just over the edge of the bridge deck, but not near the edge of the hull.
    Mike
    "Allante I" Rayburn 75
    Previous: '97 4788

    Comment


      #3
      We have a Zodiac YL340 for our tender

      It fits lenghwise with the bottom of the motor judt aft of the edge of the hard top and enough room foreward to move around.

      sideways would block the hatch

      KEVIN SANDERS
      4788 LISAS WAY
      SEWARD, ALASKA

      Comment


        #4
        We have a 12’ Rendova and position it so the motor hangs over the end of the bridgedeck. There is about 2’ minimum to walk between the bow and the rear seat back. Works great!
        2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
        12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
        MV Kia Orana
        Currently Alameda CA

        Comment


          #5
          We have a YL380 Zodiac with Honda 40 on our 4788.It fits lengthwise .Motor hangs over the end of bridge deck
          It fits ok but I would prefer a RIB a bit smaller if it was to be replaced.Never tried sideways

          Comment


            #6
            We don't plan on using the stairs at the back and I was thinking that having the dinghy mounted sideways would make the upper deck space a little more user friendly
            Stan
            2001 Bayliner 4788
            Underhulls
            Bow & Stern Thrusters
            Hydronic heater
            330 Cummins

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by stanfromhell View Post
              We don't plan on using the stairs at the back and I was thinking that having the dinghy mounted sideways would make the upper deck space a little more user friendly
              I think you will find that a RIB pretty much fills up that back space either way.

              I have a small household chest freezer tucked into the corner just aft of the bench seat on the port side.The rib allows plenty of room for me to walk in front of it, but you'd be amazed how your huge looking boat deck seems to get filled up by a RIB really quickly.

              You will also be amazed at just how small a RIB is on the inside if you havent played with the bigger heavier ones much. I bought a Boston Whaler a couple seasons ago now and am thinking seriously about replacing my rib with it. The Whaler is lighter, gets up on plane easier, holds more, and is indestructible.

              KEVIN SANDERS
              4788 LISAS WAY
              SEWARD, ALASKA

              Comment


                #8
                Besides adding more weight towards the stern of the boat, mounting the tender sideways means that the weight of the outboard would probably be on the port side, which adds to the natural list to port that the 4788’s and 490’s already have. Stan’s 4788 has underhulls which should help with buoyancy, but most 4788 & 490 owners tend to become concerned about losing the original waterline as weight gets added to the boat over time.

                Perhaps a bigger issue would be the lifting radius of the standard davit, which may not reach far enough towards the stern of the boat deck to give a straight lift on a cross mounted tender, and the boom may need to be extended. Besides the engineering and safety factors that lengthening the boom involves (been there - done that) these davits are a challenge to manually rotate with the weight of the tender on them, so a longer boom would be even more difficult, particularly when recovering the tender.
                Rob
                Bayliner 5788
                'Merlin V'
                Vancouver BC

                Comment


                  #9
                  My 9ft AB fits I still have enough seating. I personal wouldn’t go any bigger than 10ft.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    We had a Zodiac YL380 (12.5') lengthwise and found it to be the best fit and smallest RIB that was really self sufficient when launched.

                    Northport NY

                    Comment


                      #11
                      We have experience with the rib mounted both ways. For and aft on a 4788 we chartered several years ago and athwartship (side to side) on our boat. We much prefer that latter for the lounging space we recover and for launching/retrieving. The motor does hang over, but it hasn’t been problematic, as we usually dock on the starboard side. I suppose if it lined up with a piling there could be the potential for a problem, but less so than having to deal with a piling near the bow on either side.

                      We had the boat for and aft for a few hours last year to install the registration numbers and difference in deck space was remarkable. We have room for two deck chairs and a table and it is a favorite spot for the admiral and others when underway looking back on the wake.

                      Our experince with launching and retrieval is we are is we are never having to place ourselves between the rib and the hoist and it feels to us a bit safer. I am not thin and I am able to go up and down the ladder if need be with the rib on the deck, it’s a squeeze, but I occasionally do it.

                      As as far as listing to port, every 4788/490 in our marina list to port ours doesn’t seem worse or better than the others. The outboard is farther from the cg but the rib is actually more centered.

                      Ours install has a plastic vee block mounted on the deck that fits in the notch of the rib where the motor shaft is. You raise the motor some before lifting, hoist it all the way up, turn the rib 90 degrees with the bowline and pull it across the deck until the notch on the rib is resting in the block. Lower it, latch it down and lower the outboard some more. With the block It always ends up at the exact same spot.

                      The stern is easy to secure with shackles because you have good access using the port side step and the handrail. The only challenge is too remember to look up so you don’t pull your head up into the skeg of the outboard. It has happened to us on one occasion.

                      You might try try cutting some wood blocks with a vee notch and try it both ways.

                      My unsolicited opinion on dinghies is ribs are the way to go, Bullfrogs are even better. Consoles with big motors are fun, but I would prefer no console, just a tiller with a small moter for crabbing, beaching and running to a dock from anchor. That’s 95% of our dinghies mission.
                      Partner in a 1999 4788

                      Seattle, WA

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X