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    Borescope Hinos

    I have been talking to a diesel mechanic about a boat I am interested in purchasing. He suggested I do a borescope as part of the mechanical inspection/survey. It's a bit spendy ($1200 additional).
    I have not heard anybody mention a borescope as part of the engine survey. Is this money well spent? Boat is a 1995 4788 with Hino 310s and Westerbeke genset.

    #2
    As an AME (aircraft maintenance engineer) in commercial aviation I perform turbine engine borescopes quite frequently. I'd be interested to hear where this borescope will be looking.
    Sea Venture
    2000 3055, 5.7/B2, 18x23" props
    Cruising the PNW and beyond.
    DIYC, Riverhouse Marina
    MMSI 316029971

    Kirk
    Drinks well with others.

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      #3
      Get in touch with Earl Summerville aka the Baylinerguru for a reason. http://www.susanmohr.com/index.html
      Tell him what’s going on and the particulars about why the mechanic is recommending a borescope. My reaction, for what it’s worth, is that the mechanic is keying on your reluctance, nervousness and concerns about the engines. Almost all of us have been there. If there are good maintenance records available your risk is probably lower. The engines themselves are very robust. The most common cause of engine failure in these, or any marine engine is water in the combustion chamber. The source is either the riser or in the case of Hinos, the manicooler. If there has been a problem with either, the current owner should disclose it and what was done to correct it. Personally, I’d be more nervous about the turbo, oil cooler and after cooler. Their condition is a great indicator of overall maintenance IMO. If they have been obviously maintained, like no paint on the visible nuts and bolts, my confidence would rise significantly.
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
      MMSI 367770440
      1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
      Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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        #4
        not needed, its a Bullshit trick, does it smoke ever? use oil? Making metal in the oil? Bore scope on Small airplanes is even bullshit,

        you don't hear of many Hinos with problems if the mainten has been kept up.
        1988 3270
        135 hinos
        Seldovia ALASKA
        KEVINS UPHOLSTERY
        KEVINSBOATTOPS.COM
        Marine canvas/Upholstery
        since 1975

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          #5
          Could buy your own scope.. bought mine that I use on Big Block chevy builds for $200.. Has helped me out a ton.

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            #6
            Bought my wireless borescope on amazon for $29

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              #7
              In my opinion $1200 would be a waist of money.
              I've been and aircraft mechanic for 50 years. I used to have a ridged boro for receip engines.Wasn't real useful. If there is anything wrong that you can see with the boro then you will have symptoms that will show without looking. Have Earl take a look at them.

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                #8
                While I tend to agree that symptoms of a worn or otherwise unhealthy engine may reveal themselves otherwise there’s no escaping the fact that direct visualization of the combustion chamber and valves provides a deeper understanding and true condition of the cylinder. Several years ago Continental Aircraft Engines published Service Bulletin SB03-3 in which they specified every engine should be borescoped at every annual or 100hr inspection. This was because Continental learned that stand alone compression testing didn’t adequately assess the health of an engine. To prove this Continental purposefully widened the ring gaps of a new engine to the point that the results of a differential compression test would have grounded the engine. They then ran the engine on a test stand and the engine made full rated power!
                In a nutshell a compression test might indicate a problem whereas the borescope identifies and confirms the issue.

                Here’s an interesting article form AOPA (Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association: https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/...ance-borescope

                Continental Aircraft Engine SB03-3: http://www.jerrytemple.com/assets/Up...e-Bulletin.pdf

                Obviously I support the use of a borescope as a tool to determine the health of an engine. However, I do not know the complexity and limitations of using a borscope on a Hino diesel. If the injectors must be removed to provide borescope access then the time and economics may preclude or limit the use of the scope. That’s not to say the information a scope would provide wouldn’t be valuable or provide a new owner peace of mind just that an economic decision has to be made as to the value of that information.

                In my own personal Hino powered boat purchase my trusted diesel mechanic talked me out of spending the money for even a compression test due to the fact that on a cold December day in the PNW both engines lit off within 2-3 seconds (no preheat), did not smoke when at operating temp, made WOT and the boat performed as it should. He was right in his assessment.

                Low cost but but very capable scope: https://www.amazon.com/Vividia-Ables.../dp/B00GY7C9ZW
                Jim Gandee
                1989 3888
                Hino 175's
                Fire Escape
                Fyrflyer@ca.rr.com

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