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    #16
    That’s looks great, but the retailers for the DuPont product are really proud of it. The best price I found on line was $240 for a gallon, then $80 for the activator/reducer, and, it needs 60 degrees at a minimum. The activators are based on temperature ranges and 60 was the lowest I saw. A gallon is great for a production shop that going to use less than a pint on a 38, but if a gallon is a minimum, it’s too rich for my blood.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
    MMSI 367770440
    1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
    Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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      #17
      You can buy new wood for less, just a little labor.
      Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

      Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
      Twin 350 GM power
      Located in Seward, AK
      Retired marine surveyor

      Comment


        #18
        in the 18 years I've had my 4588, I've tried multiple approaches to managing exterior teak. Researched and decided 'Bristol Finish', a urethane, was a good option. Sanded down to bare wood old finish and applied... over 100 hours of work! 3 years later found it was not a good choice! Material separated from teak (teak is a naturally oily wood) but found that the real issue is that any wood in a marine environment will absorb water, and that water is what you need to deal with. my solution: I sanded all the teak down again and then built 8-10 coats of varnish, sanding in between coats, until I had a beautiful glossy surface. Then, the key, I caulked around the wood to prevent water getting under the teak and penetrating into the wood. Next, I had canvas cap rail covers made, and enclosed the aft cockpit and bowsprit. 7 years later, I still have gorgeous teak, which has only required minimal varnish repair. Bottom line: whatever system you prefer, consider protecting it from sun and water damage... I chose varnish because it can be repaired/recoated easily.... but protection is key.

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          #19
          I just started working on the exterior teak on my 3288. It sat neglected in the weather for years before I acquired her.

          The approach I'm taking is this:
          1. Use zip-strip or some other gelled stripper to remove the small amount of remaining varnish.
          2. Clean everything with Te-ka
          3. Sand smooth with 220.
          4. Apply two to four coats of West Marine Epoxy using #207 Special Clear Hardener.
          Sanding between coats and after the second coat.
          The number of coats depends on how many coats it takes to get a smooth surface.
          5. Apply two coats of (unthinned if new) Pettit 2015 Varnish
          6. Apply one coat of (unthinned if new) Pettit 1015 Varnish

          I don't have pics yet but will try to remember to take pics as I go and post when done.

          I got this process from Boatworks Today.

          Part 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqiXZrs5hvM

          Part 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNLQRRDaitE


          Paul
          US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

          1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
          MMSI: 338181912

          Comment


            #20
            +1 on cetol light! Nice stuff!!

            instead of pulling the teak, you can just caulk where the wood and Fibreglass meet after wood has been cleaned, sanded and cetol’d.

            teak oil never seems to protect for me either. For interior wood you can try melting some beeswax and add 5 parts teak oil to it. Gives you the look of teak oil but with a smooth protective finish. Best way is to get a clean tuna can and place in a pot with 1/2” of boiling water. Add bees wax in can, stir until melted. Add teak oill, Stir, remove from boiling water and let cool. You can adjust consistency by reheating and adding more beeswax or more teak oil.
            Craig
            Nanaimo bc
            1987 bayliner 3818
            w/ 175 Hinos no Genny, but solar to run everything!
            10ft Livingston with centre console and 15hp on davits / winch

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              #21
              yup, epoxy then varnish
              Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
              Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
              93 3058 sold
              92 2855 (day boat)
              91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
              Longbranch WA
              Life is Good

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                #22
                If you don't want to spend your time and money on keeping your teak looking like a marina showboat, leave it natural (That's how it's supposed to be. See any big ship)
                Maintenance will be, after a good sanding down to #400 to have it very smooth and soft to the touch, reduced to regular hosing (to remove surface dirt) soap and blue scratchpad to bring it back to nice looking every time you wash the boat and twice a year maybe using a pressure washer from very far and set to wide fan spray for a deep cleaning followed by a #400 grit sand paper.
                Cost: nothing and a beautiful natural look.
                NILE
                1989 3288MY 305's US Marine
                Fort Lauderdale Florida

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                  #23
                  If you seal your teak to the hull be sure there is no water or wet wood between the two!
                  Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                  Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                  Twin 350 GM power
                  Located in Seward, AK
                  Retired marine surveyor

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by Timcup View Post
                    +1 on cetol light! Nice stuff!!

                    instead of pulling the teak, you can just caulk where the wood and Fibreglass meet after wood has been cleaned, sanded and cetol’d.

                    teak oil never seems to protect for me either. For interior wood you can try melting some beeswax and add 5 parts teak oil to it. Gives you the look of teak oil but with a smooth protective finish. Best way is to get a clean tuna can and place in a pot with 1/2” of boiling water. Add bees wax in can, stir until melted. Add teak oill, Stir, remove from boiling water and let cool. You can adjust consistency by reheating and adding more beeswax or more teak oil.
                    If you seal your teak to the hull be sure there is no water or wet wood between the two or it will lift the new finish.
                    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                    Twin 350 GM power
                    Located in Seward, AK
                    Retired marine surveyor

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Agreed! Seal it the heart of summer after it has baked a bit!
                      Craig
                      Nanaimo bc
                      1987 bayliner 3818
                      w/ 175 Hinos no Genny, but solar to run everything!
                      10ft Livingston with centre console and 15hp on davits / winch

                      Comment


                        #26
                        After much reading when I started redoing this 2655 I ended up using OxyClean spray and a very soft bristled brush so I wouldn't continue removing more of the softer grain layers. Did this twice since it looked like the P/O never did anything to it. Although a lot of what I read discouraged sanding in favor of the vintage weathered look, I hit mine (mostly the top side) with 180, 320 and 4oo grit to even the surface some and next started with what was around 7 applications of Tung Oil. I remember reading that the teak would "drink" up the oil depending on how dry of it the wood was. Over a week and a half I'd lightly ScotchBrite the surface and apply another coating only to check the following day and other than the color not looking like driftwood anymore it looked like it hadn't had oil in years. By the 5th coat it began to get a little sheen to it and at coat 7 it was looking glossy and smoother. I know boatworkfl mentioned not building it up too much but I really remember in my research several sources saying that it needed to be re coated until the wood stopped soaking in and do remember reading that scuffing before re-application "opened" the surface up so the grain could drink. Mine's still hanging by the stainless in the house and Once I get her in the water this fall (I hope...) I'm going to take note of how long it takes before it needs oiling again. Just started sanding and re staining the Ash trim inside. I agree with Hamnavoe...... somethin about the look of freshly oiled teak...... and keep her covered. The UV's are rough on wood and if you put anything over the oil to seal the wood, even stuff with UV protectors, I remember reading would begin to crack, cloud and lift. I got a silver one side / brown the other and unless it's hot out leave that tarp in place.
                        Dave
                        N.C. Boater, fresh and salt water. New to boating in 2009
                        1990 Sunbridge 2655 "One Particular Harbour"
                        5.7 Mercruiser Alpha 1 Gen 1
                        Past:
                        1995 SeaPro 210 C/C "Hydro-Therapy"
                        Mariner 150
                        Towing with:
                        2002 Ford F 350 7.3L Super Duty
                        West of Hickory NC

                        Comment


                          #27
                          https://www.amazon.com/Dalys-SeaFin-...+seafin+sealer

                          I refreshed my teak around the cockpit yesterday, 1 minute to wipe it down with mineral spirits, about 3 minutes to apply this. Looks perfect.

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