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Thinking of upsizing ??? Our reflections on moving to a 4788-gctid401553

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    Thinking of upsizing ??? Our reflections on moving to a 4788-gctid401553

    Well, we're 1/2 way through our first season with our 4788 having moved from a 2859 Bayliner.

    Here's what we have found, both the good and the not so good about making the transition from a cabin cruiser to a large motoryacht.

    First the good...

    Everybody knows the 4788 is a big comfortable boat. People often do not realized just how large a vessel it really is.

    Putting it into terms of a change from our 2859...

    With the admrial and I on board, with one dog, we enjoyed it, but after 2 nights out, we were ready to get off of the boat.

    Now we take all 4 dogs, and generally a guest, stay out three nights at a minimum and do not feel crowded at all.

    On a 28' cabin cruiser you have no privacy. literally going to the bathroom is a fairly public affair. On the 47' boat you get plenty of privacy. The head spaces are separated from the living spaces. Getting dressed or taking a shower is just like at home.

    The 4788 is a true 2nd home. I for example have a full set of clothes, towles, etc... on the boat. The last day of the cruise I wash everything and its ready for the next voyage.

    The 4788 is a easier to dock than the 2859 was. Probably due to its size and twin screws.

    We can go out in seas that we'd never dream of in the 2859. We don't stop and fish in those seas but going through them is not too bad. The admrial is never scared in the 4788. She reflects that she prayed allot in the 2859 in the open ocean.

    The 4788 is more fuel efficient than the 2859 was. We're getting about 1.5 NMPG at cruise speeds vs the 2859 was 1 nmpg average. We also have more fuel capacity. With 440 gallons of fuel I'm filling the tanks every 2-3 trips now instead of every trip out. (and I could go longer). The 4788 also has more range. With my extended tanks I had about 150-160 NM of useful range in the 2859. Destinations were often chosen based on fuel concerns. In the 4788 I would have no issues at all with a 400 NM trip.

    Having a built in Quiet generator is more than fantastic! Push a button and you have better than shore power. Run the stove, recharge the batteries, etc... This feature cannot be underestimated. We had a 2KW inverter on our 2859 and have a 3KW unit on the 4788, but a built in generator is a whole different thing altogether.

    Having a full size refreigerator/freezer, a smaller referigerator and an icemaker are great! The only thing we use a cooler for anymore is fish. We store bait in the flybridge referigerator and turn it up so it freezes our bait between cruises. No more buying ice or worse yet running low on ice during a cruise. The icemaker puts out more ice than we need.

    Now to the bad... :sorrow:

    Sometimes I really miss the 27 knots we could cruise at in our 2859. We've gotten used to cruising at 8 knots but if you want to get somewhere it takes FOREVER! Yes we could cruise at 15 knots but we loost allot of the comfort of slow cruising, its a tradeoff I guess.

    Fishing is just not as much fun on the 4788. If we anchor off then its about the same but drift fishing is much more difficult. Trolling is a laugh. Last weekend they were calling me on the radio when they had a fish on in the cockpit.

    So...

    If you're thinking of trading up, the 4788 is a great boat, but there are advantages and disadvantages of 20' itis. If I was still into fishing with all of the passion for it I had years ago then it would be a tossup in favor of the 2859. For cruising the 4788 cant be beat.

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    www.transferswitch4less.com

    Whats the weather like on our boat
    https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


    Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

    #2
    someday kevin someday

    Comment


      #3
      'Sometimes I really miss the 27 knots we could cruise at in our 2859'

      'Fishing is just not as much fun on the 4788'

      Perhaps consider towing a large dinghy and all of your requirements might be met - worked for us anyway.

      Hope this helps
      Northport NY

      Comment


        #4
        smitty477 wrote:
        'Sometimes I really miss the 27 knots we could cruise at in our 2859'

        'Fishing is just not as much fun on the 4788'

        Perhaps consider towing a large dinghy and all of your requirements might be met - worked for us anyway.

        Hope this helps
        I actually mentioned that to my admrial and we're thinking about it. I remembered somewhere that you towed a large skiff/ fishing boat and used your 4788 as a base camp.

        Thanks

        KEVIN SANDERS
        4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
        www.transferswitch4less.com

        Whats the weather like on our boat
        https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


        Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

        Comment


          #5
          "Fishing is just not as much fun on the 4788. If we anchor off then its about the same but drift fishing is much more difficult. Trolling is a laugh. Last weekend they were calling me on the radio when they had a fish on in the cockpit."

          Kevin, I agree with you on the plus side of the 47. I fortunately bought the 47 when I was looking for a 28. Never regretted it.

          I do kick the speed up a bit if we need to get somewhere. 15-17 kts isn't bad but it's not as relaxing as 10 to 12. I haven't plugged along at 8 kts yet for any length of time. If fuel prices keep going the way they are I may give it a try.

          I tow my little 12 foot aluminum fishing/tender. I enjoy fishing in it much more then the 47. It's easier to get to areas where the bottom fish are. When I first got the boat I intended to put down riggers on but decided against it. I really don't enjoy trolling all day for one salmon in WA. Up north where the fish are I've tried it a few times on the 47 but prefer a smaller boat.

          Chris

          Comment


            #6
            Good post Kevin!!!

            All boats are trade offs and a collection of compromises. We really enjoy our 45. There are a few things I would change but apples to apples and factoring what we paid for what we got into the equation...the 45 is hard to beat. It is, in my opinion, the "best small but big boat" out there. Very manageable for 2 or even just 1 really, fuel efficient, good layout, and a ton of boat for the money. Yes...I day dream of a full beam width walk in engine room with full head height, an aft master stateroom but still having a cockpit, a bit more separation between staterooms, maybe the heads slightly more spacious but again, for what we paid and what we got- the 45 (or the better 47!) can't be beat anywhere by any other vessel out there. The funny thing is that as I was typing this while sitting in the salon of our 45 watching my son play his video game on the TV, he turned around, looked at me, and said out of the blue, "Dad, isn't this a great boat?!" he had no idea I was responding to this thread. He is a total boat addict like me!!

            Going at 27 knots is overrated. Slow down. Take it easy. Enjoy life on the water. If I want to go fast I throw the kids in the 17' boston whaler dauntless and zip around and take them wakeboarding. As you know Kevin, the 45 or 47 is meant to be enjoyed with a glass of good wine, not a shot of redbull!! :arr

            Again- great post and I agree with your observations.
            ~~1987 Bayliner 4550 Pilothouse & 17' Boston Whaler Dauntless~~

            Comment


              #7
              I sold my 26' a short while ago and have just put 5000 down on a 4387. I'm a little nervous. I want to be able to do at least part of the loop. You mentioned the wave action between the two in the ocean. I know on the 26 even on calm days it seem to be alot of motion. I noticed on the boat I'm buying nothing is bolted down. What are some of the things I should look for on my sea trial. Did you have much trouble learning the twin screws..I'm a little nervous about docking this big thing. I was very good with my 26 but sometimes the wind would give me hell. I enjoyed your post. Are you able to go out alone?

              David

              Comment


                #8
                We have had our 47 since Dec of 95, so I guess I would say we like it. For serious fishing we always towed a fishing boat, first a 17 foot Arima cuddy cabin and then a 19 foot Sea Swirl Cuddy Cabin behind our 47-wife insisted any fishing boat had to have a head with privacy. Did that for about 12 years and probably close to 10,000 miles of towing (700-800 miles per year plus more on trip to SE Ak). Only quit towing since my wife said she was just too darn old to fight a 2000 # or more boat every time we pulled up to a dock, in addition to her normal duties of docking. My best boat was probably our 28 Bayliner Bounty we had for almost 10 years. We did not think anything of running it 90 miles each way on a weekend, of course that was when fuel was a lot cheaper and it was fast, a 30 knot cruise with twin 350 Chevs. That was a nice boat when I was working (not retired) and did not have as much time for trips.
                Started boating 1965
                Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                Comment


                  #9
                  David,

                  I think you'll find the twin screw inboard a lot easier to dock. Differential power works wonders. At slow speeds just keep the rudders centered and the power at idle. (don't touch the steering wheel) Shift between FWD, NEUT & REV to get the motion you need. It should be an easy transition.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Pacrimrat wrote:
                    David,

                    I think you'll find the twin screw inboard a lot easier to dock. Differential power works wonders. At slow speeds just keep the rudders centered and the power at idle. (don't touch the steering wheel) Shift between FWD, NEUT & REV to get the motion you need. It should be an easy transition.
                    Thanks for the response.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      mrmomdav wrote:
                      I sold my 26' a short while ago and have just put 5000 down on a 4387. I'm a little nervous. I want to be able to do at least part of the loop. You mentioned the wave action between the two in the ocean. I know on the 26 even on calm days it seem to be alot of motion. I noticed on the boat I'm buying nothing is bolted down. What are some of the things I should look for on my sea trial. Did you have much trouble learning the twin screws..I'm a little nervous about docking this big thing. I was very good with my 26 but sometimes the wind would give me hell. I enjoyed your post. Are you able to go out alone?

                      David
                      http://www.yachtsurvey.com/docking.htm

                      I found this useful. I have a copy on my boat and read it from time to time.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        docking with twins and not only just twins, but twin diesels, is MUCH easier than docking a single screw I/O 26' boat. The larger the boat the easier it is to dock by far. Whether the boat has prop pockets or not makes a big difference (reduced draft but not as responsive) but still much, much easier. Don't let the size of the boat intimidate you. It is a cakewalk on the larger vessels and if you can parallel park a car, you will be docking a 40-50' twin diesel boat within 20 minutes and a few practice runs. if even a gas engine boat with twins the same applies- super easy.

                        Of interesting note to me as a side topic, is the difference in handling between the 45 and the 47. Having piloted boat, I am amazed at how the 47 is decidedly more responsive in slow speed maneuvering. Big difference being that the 47 does not have prop pockets.
                        ~~1987 Bayliner 4550 Pilothouse & 17' Boston Whaler Dauntless~~

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Woodsong wrote:
                          Going at 27 knots is overrated. Slow down. Take it easy. Enjoy life on the water. If I want to go fast I throw the kids in the 17' boston whaler dauntless and zip around and take them wakeboarding. As you know Kevin, the 45 or 47 is meant to be enjoyed with a glass of good wine, not a shot of redbull!! :arr

                          Again- great post and I agree with your observations.
                          Thats just what we do. Thats also why I don't drive this boat up on plane. I wanted a different experience than our planing hull boats.

                          We do have our speed outlets though... On a nice summer evening it can be great to go ride the seadoos for awhile. Our dock is 45' from our door at home. .

                          KEVIN SANDERS
                          4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                          www.transferswitch4less.com

                          Whats the weather like on our boat
                          https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                          Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I had a momentary chuckle when I got to the "not as fun to fish off" part of your post Kevin. Kind of like complaining that you can't dangle your feet into the water on your new 170 foot mega yacht! I kind of missed the rapid mobility of a smaller boat when we got our 4588 and immediately began towing a 19 foot center consul on bigger, trips. I get the point above about handling a 2000 lb boat for the admiral as posted above, "every time they went to dock" To resolve this I mounted three big scottsmen to the 19 footer, and made a two carabiner snap shackle system to tightly hold the boat against the big boat. With a couple of ropes with loops ready to receive them in place off the stern and midship cleats. We can be hit with big waves and it just stays there like a "good dog" (also the name of the 19 footer) I would not tow for any lenth of time this way, or in big water, but for fueling and docking I hardly know it is there, and there is zero boat handling to do other than to convert from a tow to the snap hookup on one side of the boat (my set up is starboard) I can do that single handed with ease. I used this setup on our 38 foot tug as well, but had a small winch mounted under the rear deck, with amsteel rope. This rope exited the hull just under the stern bumper rail. The winch was equipped with a wireless remote so when docking I could winch the tender into the boat until I felt it bump up against the stern rail of the tug. That was a sweet set up. You did not even have to get your hands wet to pull in the 19 footer! I have been thinking of installing one (winch in the lazz) on our present 4588. Great setup for a stern anchor, shore tie, or tender hauling.

                            Cheers all. Steve

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I went from a 26 to a 38 and also have found docking much easier.

                              The twin screws are a big help as is the mass which keeps the boat where you put it long enough for you to do something (like step off on the pier!)

                              As for fishing, I troll with my 38 but seem to care less and less about catching. I just want to be out there.

                              Glad you are enjoying it.

                              Comment

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