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Newbie question, how to shift?

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    Newbie question, how to shift?

    Hi there,
    so much to learn about boating and our 3587!
    Please forgive my lack of knowledge, but want to find out the correct transmission shifting technique ie. No throttle etc? Just don't want to abuse anything!
    Thank you,
    Dean

    #2
    Always shift with rpm at idle. If at all possible don't shift into gear forward or reverse when engines are above idle speed. I have to admit there have been a time or two when I forgot the the idle was up I got distracted and slammed a gear. My paragons can tolerate that some but there are some transmissions that can fail when you do that.

    I have found it happens most when I'm docking and need to up the throttle a bit to get the boat to do what I need it to do. I get distracted forget i upped the throttle in a tense moment.

    if you can help it do your docking with with engines in idle bumping the gears (Not always possible) shifting In and out in the direction needed but if you need throttle try not to forget to drop it back down ....your transmissions will last longer.
    1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
    twin 454's
    MV Mar-Y-Sol
    1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
    Twin chevy 350's inboard
    Ben- Jamin
    spokane Washington

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      #3
      You won't hurt Hurst transmissions shifting above idle, but there is no reason to shift above idle.
      1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

      Comment


        #4
        I agree with yachtman about shifting at idle and I always trying to maneuver at idle using the wind and or current to help me rather than fighting it. You wouldn’t shift your car or truck at more than idle, right? That’s not alway possible but that’s my baseline. The other thing we added to our routine is wireless headsets. We can talk in a regular “inside” voice even when things are not going so well. There’s no need to pump up the volume so it sounds like you are yelling at each other, hence they are also called marriage savers.
        Borrow a bunch of fenders and line a dock with them then practice, practice, practice. Learn how to turn the boat around with the bow staying about the mid beam distance from the dock. You will find that doing things slowly and letting the boat fully react to a bump in direction will go a long way to improve your maneuvering skills.
        P/C Pete
        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
        MMSI 367770440

        Comment


          #5
          We lived aboard for several years. I could always recognize the amateurs when they came into the dock - lots of roaring from the engines and lots of yelling between the crew. Learn to dock quietly. Your neighbours and your transmissions will appreciate it. With a single screw there would be more occasions when you need the throttle but with twins you should never need throttle unless you're fighting a current or wind.
          R.J.(Bob) Evans
          Buchanan, SK
          Cierra 2755
          Previously 43 Defever, Response LX
          Various runabouts, canoes & kayaks

          Comment


            #6
            Yep, thats the scenario I have been wondering about.
            thank you!

            Comment


              #7
              I have a friend with a 3587 and it can be a real pig in the wind. He shifts well above idle, has for years. I agree with all the above advice, but you will note that the transmissions will resist what they don't like meaning if the idle is too high, they simply will not let you shift. They are tough as hell, but yes avoid doing it.

              Comment


                #8
                Agree there is never any reason to shift above idle, but it can be done. Always pause when going from fwd to reverse when maneuvering, never just go straight through. When I was new to my 4087, I used to practice holding the boat in one position, with very small adjustments, little blips, useful if you ever have to go through locks and can’t tie up while waiting. Both 35’s & 40’s blow around a lot, take the time to practice docking in all conditions to give yourself confidence. I spent 4-5 days when we first got ours, going from the dock to the pump out and back in all conditions. Discussing exactly what is expected of the crew before docking alway reduces the stress, along with making sure lines, fenders, winds, currents other boats etc have all been taken into account. Don’t be too proud to ask for help or go round again if things aren’t looking good!
                Machog
                1996 4087 Lazy Days
                2011 11’ West Marine Rib 350 Lazy Mac
                2011 Porsche Cayman
                2010 Lexus IS 250C
                2008 Honda Ridgeline

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Machog View Post
                  Discussing exactly what is expected of the crew before docking alway reduces the stress, along with making sure lines, fenders, winds, currents other boats etc have all been taken into account. Don’t be too proud to ask for help or go round again if things aren’t looking good!
                  Machog
                  This is the best advice in this thread. Talk to your crew ahead of time and recognize when its gone sideways, admit it and start over.

                  We have a firm rule on our boat "NO LEAPING". That means the skipper's job is to lay the boat alongside the dock and the crew absolutely doesn't go ashore until the boat is stopped a safe distance from the dock. The crew always has the final decision about whether its safe to step ashore. STEP ashore as opposed to LEAP ashore.
                  R.J.(Bob) Evans
                  Buchanan, SK
                  Cierra 2755
                  Previously 43 Defever, Response LX
                  Various runabouts, canoes & kayaks

                  Comment


                    #10
                    You will not damage Hurst by going between forward and reverse without pausing in neutral. You're going to need to find a clear dock and practise, You will soon develop a feel for whether your style is to pause or not. Wind and current will always present their challenge.
                    1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

                    Comment


                      #11
                      It's true Hurth transmissions are pretty hardy, but I have seen someone blow the top of the transmission case off shifting at a significantly high rpm on a 32 (not mine!). Best not to find out where that point is and always shift at idle.
                      '90 3288 Gas
                      Sacramento Delta, California.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        When im docking shifting from forward to reverse and viceversa is never an issue ( unless it's a holy crap moment) because i always drive from neutral, meaning......

                        my transmissions are always I neutral except when doing a long rotation or moving a significant distance. It goes something like this. Coasting in neatral bump in gear 1 second 2 seconds out back to neutral. Assess the movement gear back in 1 ,2 and out sometimes more some times it's a in and out sometimes it's forward and sometimes reverse or one forward and one reverse.

                        Mostly it's coasting and assessing. If it's windy or lots of current sometimes you might have to bump up a throttle but avoid it if you can but sometimes you just need more power. Go slow. Sometimes you might need the wheel too but since you are new at it don't touch the wheel ( wheel straight)or the throttles.( throttles at idle) unless its absolutely necessary. Learn one thing at a time then increase your skill little by little. . I'm no expert but I have yet to ram a dock or another boat.
                        Last edited by yachtman; 12-08-2017, 01:46 PM.
                        1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
                        twin 454's
                        MV Mar-Y-Sol
                        1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
                        Twin chevy 350's inboard
                        Ben- Jamin
                        spokane Washington

                        Comment


                          #13
                          When we had our 4788, 98% of the time we would shift at idle (~600rpm). However, when you get a difficult docking in adverse wind or current conditions, and idle power just isn't responsive enough, don't hesitate to bump up rpm to 700, 800 or 900, as necessary, and shift there. That will make your inputs much stronger, might save you from a nasty crunch and with this type of infrequent use will not hurt your Hurth transmission.
                          Mike
                          "Allante I" Rayburn 75
                          Previous: '97 4788

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I find the 4788 sometimes responds better with a bit of throttle when maneuvering. What I do when I speed up one side or the other in gear is to keep a hand on the throttle that way I don’t forget to return to idle prior to shifting.
                            Partner in a 1999 4788

                            Seattle, WA

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                              #15
                              all this talk of docking makes me think Spring is far away.

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