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32XX Holding Tank Capacity-gctid400578

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    32XX Holding Tank Capacity-gctid400578

    The admiral is always complaining about the holding tank capacity when we are on extended trips. The 3270 owner's manual that I downloaded from this site states that the holding tank is 13 gallons. Does anyone know if all 32XX's came originally with this capacity? When that worthless Tank Watch light comes on is there any margin left? How many days should that capacity accommodate two normal people? Thanks

    #2
    The waste tank is 23 US gallons. The tank watch comes on about 90% full. You don't want to overfill or the vent might clog. 23 gallons should get 2 of you through a 3 day weekend. Longer with less TP flushed.
    1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

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      #3
      Older 32s have the 13 gallon tank. New ones, I believe somewhere around 88 have the 23 gallon tank. My 85 had the 13 gallon and I just upgraded to a 25 gallon tank. "How many days should that capacity accommodate two normal people?" So what is the baseline for normal people??????
      1997 3788/Cummins 6BTA 5.9 M2s (Sold)
      2003 Silverton 42c/Cummins 480CEs
      2019 Cobia 240 CC
      2006 Boston Whaler 13 Sport
      1985 3270/Hino 135s (Sold)

      Vero Beach, Fl.

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        #4
        More than most want to know - a good "liquid flush" requires 0.5 to 1.0 gal, whereas a "solid flush" requires 1.0 to 1.5 gal typically - so let's say 1 gal/flush (gpf) on average. Figure 1 to 2 solid and 2 to 3 liquid flushes per day per person, or say 4 flush/day on average. So with two people on board that's 8 gal/day, so a 23 gal tank should last about three (3) days. Good luck with that, Doug S.

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          #5
          Mine has the 13 gallon also. We try to pump ours out as often as possible....even if it's not full. Keeping it pumped out and clean helps eliminate foul smells.

          How long should it last?......That all depends on how much beer you drink.

          All kidding aside. We try not to use more water to flush than is needed. You don't need a full toilet of water to flush 4 oz of #1. At the end of the day we will flush a full toilet of clean water down the line to make sure everything has reached the tank.

          #2 is a different story. We flush a second full toilet of clean water after the first flush.

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            #6
            In order to determine if I have a 13 or a 23 gallon tank, I went into the cave and measured it. It is 14.25" X 11" X 28" or 2.54 cubic feet. At 7.48 gallons per cubic foot, it appears that I have a 19 gallon tank. Probably not original and installed by PO. I should have installed a larger one when I changed the hoses and eliminated the "Y" valve. Oh well, hindsight is 20/20. Thanks for the inputs.

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              #7
              R&Jonthebay wrote:
              All kidding aside. We try not to use more water to flush than is needed. You don't need a full toilet of water to flush 4 oz of #1. At the end of the day we will flush a full toilet of clean water down the line to make sure everything has reached the tank.
              I agree with your approach given how quickly the tanks fill. The link below from Jabsco says pump 7 times for each yard of hose but given the distance to the holding tank in a 32 that's a lot of water. I'm sure we'd be pumping at least 21 strokes to meet this or more. The negative is the build up of deposits in the pipe even from urine but your approach covers that to a degree by totally flushing at the end of the day.

              http://www.jamestowndistributors.com...+Marine+Toilet

              hughver wrote:
              In order to determine if I have a 13 or a 23 gallon tank, I went into the cave and measured it. It is 14.25" X 11" X 28" or 2.54 cubic feet. At 7.48 gallons per cubic foot, it appears that I have a 19 gallon tank. Probably not original and installed by PO. I should have installed a larger one when I changed the hoses and eliminated the "Y" valve. Oh well, hindsight is 20/20. Thanks for the inputs.
              Mine came with 11x25x15 and was installed/replaced by the PO. I replaced with a 35 gallon and am still amazed how quickly it fills.

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                #8
                My 1988 3270 had a 13 gallon tank when I got it. However, the PO had let the boat sit for almost a year and did not use the marine grade paper. Result was that the effective size was only a couple of gallons because the solids would not pump out. I replaced it with a 35 gallon tank. Best mod I have made to the boat. We (2people) get a week out of it before the lite comes on and we have to find a pump out.

                Jim
                1988 3270 With 135 Hinos

                Comment


                  #9
                  toukow wrote:
                  I agree with your approach given how quickly the tanks fill. The link below from Jabsco says pump 7 times for each yard of hose but given the distance to the holding tank in a 32 that's a lot of water. I'm sure we'd be pumping at least 21 strokes to meet this or more. The negative is the build up of deposits in the pipe even from urine but your approach covers that to a degree by totally flushing at the end of the day.
                  Dean,

                  Yeah, not only would we fill the tank quickly but our arms would probably cramp up from all the pumping.

                  I'm not sure if you have read my thread on our "Sanitary hose replacement". Here's a link.

                  http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...eplacement-YUK

                  If you have, please forgive me for being repetitive.

                  What I found when we changed the hoses and eliminated the "Y" valve was that the hose from the head ran down and along the bottom of the hull. It then turned up and entered the "Y" valve. This allowed waist/fluid to be trapped in the hose at all times. There was about six feet of hose that was affected just from the head alone. The hose that ran to the pump out port and to the macerator were also below the level of the holding tank for a considerable distance and suffered the same flooding problem. This issue is a major contributer to the hoses getting permeated and releasing foul smells into the boat.

                  What I did to help remedy the problem was to eliminate the "Y" valve, macerator hose run and over board discharge. I then ran the hose from the head directly to the top of the holding tank, while trying to avoid letting the hose sag below the tank.

                  Now, waist/fluid doesn't get trapped in the hose. Gravity allows it to flow unobstructed to the tank. This intern makes it possible to use less water to flush. The forward movement of the boat also helps transport the waist to the tank via centrifugal motion. Flushing at the end of the day is insurance that the hose has been cleared of waist.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Slightly off topic, but I completely eliminated the odor in my head by using my dehumidifier. I feared I needed to replace the dreaded hose (and probably do some day) , but I just run the dehumidifer in there during the week (free electricity) and let it drain into the sink. Zero unpleasant odor.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      We have a vacuflush system on our 3270 with a 28 gal holding tank. It usually takes a week plus to fill with 3-4 people on board. I do sacrifice fresh water though since the vacuflush pulls from the boats tank not raw water but it uses much less water. They are kind of expensive but after having one for the last 12 years that would be something I look for in a new boat or at least something I would put in.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        R&Jonthebay wrote:
                        Dean,

                        Yeah, not only would we fill the tank quickly but our arms would probably cramp up from all the pumping.

                        I'm not sure if you have read my thread on our "Sanitary hose replacement". Here's a link.

                        http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...eplacement-YUK

                        If you have, please forgive me for being repetitive.
                        I think I did catch this but took a look. You did a good job. I replaced everything including tank. I got rid of the wye like you did as well, but we do have areas to the north where discharge is allowed I'm pretty sure. So I installed 'sanipump' as well given they can run dry with damage. I thought I had thought everything through but the one critical element that you addressed. I wanted to go with a larger tank, this is 'merica afterall. So I get a 35 gallon and plump it but the problem is the height. I went with tall and narrower. That means the hoses that drain on yours from the head to tank, do not on mine. Also, the sanipump is tall enough that when mounted from the cave ceiling it created it's own drip loop so I installed a shut off in the line. To mitigate all of the piping forwared is hard pipe except a short piece that interfaces the pipe to the head itself.

                        I regret just not buying the 28 gallon unit with the self contained sanipump. Oh, well, live and learn. Given the PO had installed the inverter/charger suspended from the cave ceiling, it's quite congested I'm afraid. I can still get in if needed but would have preferred a cleaner solution such as yours, Dean

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