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    Wet Transom or Stringers 38xx-gctid827847

    Hello, I am relatively new here and trying to be courteous by searching before posting. I am pretty sure this topic has been well discussed but I am not having much luck finding the discussions. I made an offer yesterday on a 1989 3888. As we were filling out the sales contract my broker said some things that concern me. He indicated that these Bayliners are known for wet transom and stringers and tried to assuage the fears I might have over that in advance. His indication is that 8 out of 10 Bayliners have the issue. He went on to tell of the quality of construction in the Bayliners of this era in that the fiberglass is so thick that the stringers, even if wet would rarely become an issue. So far I trust my broker but he is now telling me that if the stringers are found to be wet and the surveyor is concerned I should not necessarily be concerned. Having slept on that I have only one conclusion. If the surveyor (mine is the most reputable in the area) is concerned I will be concerned. I will want to have the issue addressed immediately and the price to reflect that. I'll be 60 this month. I am not at a point in my life that I want a large expense looming ahead of me. I don't mind bringing out another grand or maybe two each season and rather enjoy maintaining and improving my boat, I take pride in that and it is really a matter of maintaining my peace of mind. To start out ownership in a new (to me) boat with a potentially big and nasty on the road ahead is something I want to avoid. In fact even if there is not a moisture issue I will consider rebidding/sealing of transom mounted components when the boat is hauled for its next bottom paint. Appreciate your thoughts on this.

    Post survey conclusion: There wasn't any moisture detected in the transom or the stringers. I wanted to add this here for any future potential buyer so as not to create some sort of scare. It turned out to be a false concern.
    Tony Bacon,
    Washougal, WA
    Caspian, MMSI 338355743
    1997 3788 Cummins 250hp

    #2
    Wet transom or stringers means some rot or a lot of rot. Either run or be prepared to fix it. Sealing will only seal the wet inside. You might even discover you have insurance survey issues if your surveyor notes the defect.
    1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

    Comment


      #3
      Bacon, welcome and please add where you are to your signature and maybe that you are looking for a 38xx.

      Expect your surveyor to cover his a$$ with a stringer delamination note. Have him take use a big black marker to outline the suspects down areas. My boat has some inch and a half forsener bit marks just deep enough to go through the inner skin and confirm that it is solid. As to the strength of the fiberglass on the stringers, it's a Ford vs Chev kind of thing. Some surveyors consider it a non issue, others will tell you to run. It is certainly a bargaining chip. There are two other classic problem areas, the foredeck are our the winch and the flybridge deck.

      Be sure to have a very complete engine survey. The manicoolers are expensive and are very maintenance dependent. It's simple, just change the coolant regularly. The basic engines are tough as heck and only need the basic diesel maintenance to keep them going. There are some things that are difficult, but actually more of a pita. The Port raw water pump for example. The raw water pumps need to be dismounted so that there is room for the impeller to come out past the motor mount. Jabsco makes a replacement impeller that you are going to want to use, partly for quality vs the other aftermarket impellers but also the price of the name brand impeller. One or two grand in the first couple of years is pretty light, even if you are doing your own work. I'm in year two and the list is replacing the diesel furnace because parts are beyond no longer available, replacing the toilets to fresh water electric flush, replacing the engine to transmission coupler plates and a new flying bridge cover. That's totals between five and seven boat units. Enclosing the flying bridge and cockpit is estimated at eight boats plus. All of the work is long lasting and I bought the boat for a price that will still be less than there in much worse shape. I will gladly share my checklist and everything I've done to the boat.

      These are tough, comfortable,well built boats. Best of all, the Admiral really likes it.

      One of the guys here created an excel based checklist that is incredibly detailed. PM me and I'll send you a copy.
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      MMSI 367770440

      Comment


        #4
        "Bacon" post=827847 wrote:
        Hello, I am relatively new here and trying to be courteous by searching before posting. I am pretty sure this topic has been well discussed but I am not having much luck finding the discussions. I made an offer yesterday on a 1989 3888. As we were filling out the sales contract my broker said some things that concern me. He indicated that these Bayliners are known for wet transom and stringers and tried to assuage the fears I might have over that in advance. His indication is that 8 out of 10 Bayliners have the issue. He went on to tell of the quality of construction in the Bayliners of this era in that the fiberglass is so thick that the stringers, even if wet would rarely become an issue. So far I trust my broker but he is now telling me that if the stringers are found to be wet and the surveyor is concerned I should not necessarily be concerned. Having slept on that I have only one conclusion. If the surveyor (mine is the most reputable in the area) is concerned I will be concerned. I will want to have the issue addressed immediately and the price to reflect that. I'll be 60 this month. I am not at a point in my life that I want a large expense looming ahead of me. I don't mind bringing out another grand or maybe two each season and rather enjoy maintaining and improving my boat, I take pride in that and it is really a matter of maintaining my peace of mind. To start out ownership in a new (to me) boat with a potentially big and nasty on the road ahead is something I want to avoid. In fact even if there is not a moisture issue I will consider rebidding/sealing of transom mounted components when the boat is hauled for its next bottom paint. Appreciate your thoughts on this.
        Hello Bacon and welcome,

        There are so many unusual statements and surprises in your post I have no real good place to start , here are a few I no priority order.

        - you do not see many posts on the 38;s and larger Bays as there are not many that have reported these issues (unless previously sunk)

        - The issue comes up ate contract signing and not before, curious

        - Does this example of a 38 have previous surveys past or recent

        - I know of no base of knowledge where this is prevalent with the larger Bays let alone "80%"

        - Never would I say that the fiberglass is so thick that if the Alaskan cedar below was seriously compromised would it be sufficient

        - Looking at any 1988 boat will typically mean bringing out more than a grand or two each season no matter what shape its in ( 3-4X that maybe)

        - if there is real moisture inside a hull sealing it inside is not a good solution.

        With all that said I have owned a 38 with Hino's and it was likely the very best boat for the dollar I have ever owned. It was a really great boat. You limited paragraph so far does not represent any of the many larger Bayliners that I have owned or known over the past 30 years .

        Please confirm the accuracy of your fears/concerns/information prior to spending too much money on this specific example of the 38.
        Northport NY

        Comment


          #5
          Another thought....

          You are potentially purchasing a boat that could easily have hundreds of items of interest. Typically there will be at least 6 -12 fairly serious issues with just about any boat purchase this old.

          So why is this the only item you are discussing with the boat in question both with your broker and with the BOC?

          Please think about that and also think about why that may happen.
          Northport NY

          Comment


            #6
            Welcome to the forum.

            I agree with Smitty.

            When dealing with the Bayliner motoryacht series, soft stringers and transom are very rare, maybe 1 in100?

            The areas to look at are the radar arch, fordeck, flybridge floor, bulkhead forward of the machinery space. You will also want to know if the fuel and water tanks have been replaced, they will leak at some point.

            The other area of concern is the manicoolers on the engines. If possible get someone that is familiar with Hinos to do an engine survey.
            Joel
            1987 3818 Hino 175
            "Knotty Girl"
            Prince Rupert B.C.

            Comment


              #7
              My 3870 was sunk in the Seward AK harbor in January and was under water for 2 weeks until the weather warmed enough for a diver to raise it.

              My stringers are dry as new. I do have a wet transom but it is caused by so many screws taken in and out with-out sealing them prior to my buying it from the salvage company.

              None of the cabin wood was affected, I only needed to refinish the wood and teak oil it.

              I still have a piece of stringer I have not glassed over just fwd of my stb center stringer, dry and white as can be.

              Be sure your surveyor uses a moisture meter and does his tapping if he knows how.

              If the surveyor does not have a moisture meter-find another surveyor.

              Small holes can be drilled to test the stringers and sealed after if moisture is present to confirm.
              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
              Twin 350 GM power
              Located in Seward, AK
              Retired marine surveyor

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks. I have the excel spreadsheet checklist and quite a bit of other things to check from another post I made. This forum is really great. I will be a contributor once I get my boat. The boat I have an offer on has all of the canvas as well as a hard cover over the.l cockpit. I spoke with my broker about my reservations and he reassured me that the survey will protect me which of course I know but let my buyers jitters get the best of me.
                Tony Bacon,
                Washougal, WA
                Caspian, MMSI 338355743
                1997 3788 Cummins 250hp

                Comment


                  #9
                  As previously said, you aren't finding much on the subject because this isn't much of an issue on this model. Not to say it can't happen and I would be suspicious of the statement made about this problem on the boat in question.

                  Sounds like they may know something.

                  In any event a good survey will tell the story.

                  You will love this boat.

                  Doug
                  Started boating 1955
                  Number of boats owned 32
                  Bayliners
                  2655
                  2755
                  2850
                  3870 presently owned
                  Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The survey will not protect you unless the surveyor has the proper insurance, never believe in Florida.he broker, they are just like used car salesmen, they will not insure the condition of the boat.

                    They teach this in marine (boat) surveying schools. Chapman marine surveying school.

                    I was I think 3rd in my class. The first and second both surveyed the same boat.
                    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                    Twin 350 GM power
                    Located in Seward, AK
                    Retired marine surveyor

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Plus a bunch on brokers being used car salesmen. Not to say there aren't a "few" good and responsible ones out there, but there is no way they are working in your best interest when their income is based on the commission of a sale. I don't have a grudge against a guy making a buck, I do have a problem with omissions and gamesmanship to get the sale. You are going about as good a job as you can to protect yourself on the hull, what are you doing about a mechanical survey on the engines? It is at least as important as the hull survey.
                      P/C Pete
                      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                      MMSI 367770440

                      Comment


                        #12
                        "Pcpete" post=827987 wrote:
                        Plus a bunch on brokers being used car salesmen. Not to say there aren't a "few" good and responsible ones out there, but there is no way they are working in your best interest when their income is based on the commission of a sale. I don't have a grudge against a guy making a buck, I do have a problem with omissions and gamesmanship to get the sale. You are going about as good a job as you can to protect yourself on the hull, what are you doing about a mechanical survey on the engines? It is at least as important as the hull survey.
                        Mechanical and hull surveys are always 2 different surveyors!.

                        Running the engines are never the same as a survey and an engine survey should include an engine oil analysis.
                        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                        Twin 350 GM power
                        Located in Seward, AK
                        Retired marine surveyor

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Your broker wants you to buy a more expensive boat. Fire them.

                          PS: I had a soft stringer.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I had wet stringers on my 38.

                            It was caused by the trim tab screws not being sealed.

                            As much as they were wet, they were still structural (just a little damp and black) and the amount of glass over the top of them almost negated their existence.

                            The damage went forward about 18" from the transom and was no where near the engine mounts, so it was probably perfectly good for years to come.

                            Mine were fixed while doing a hull extension, but the boatbuilder said that he could have fixed it, by cutting along the glass and then peeling the glass off to get at the wood.


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