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Nuking the water tank...what do you use??-gctid399661

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    Nuking the water tank...what do you use??-gctid399661

    Bleach? Chlorine? Peroxide?

    #2
    deman wrote:
    Bleach? Chlorine? Peroxide?
    Nothing except a good filter for all drinking water.
    Started boating 1965
    Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

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      #3
      Bleach will certainly work but hydrogen peroxide is easier on aluminum tanks {if you have them} and will not leave the odour or taste of bleach. You can get 20% peroxide from beauty supply stores and use about a cup per 100 gallons... or about a gallon if it is the 3 or 5 % stuff. Rinse, repeat etc. Also check your vent hose for black grunge as most of the nasty stuff is from there and i s STILL there if not changed or cleaned

      Cheers, Gary

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        #4
        Quite simple, right in our BOC Library:

        http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...h-Water-System
        Mike P
        The Bahamas
        Formerly Vancouver BC, Bermuda and The Grenadine Islands.

        Click here to hear my original music, FREE to download to your computer or iPod.

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          #5
          personally I use uranium 235

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            #6
            We fought bad water quality for the first four years we had the boat. We tried everything but nothing helped, not even the "Peggy" method. Last year I decided to access the tank so I could modify it. I folded the mattress in the master berth over, cut through the monkey fur at the joint between the plywood, removed four screws and picked up the plywood, exposing the tank.

            I then cut clean out ports in the top of it and installed water tight deck plates. That allowed me to be able to completely clean the inside of the tank. It was caked with calcium crystals and had an 1/8" layer of grit on the bottom. The sides were covered with a white slime.

            What I also discovered was, the water pump didn't completely drain the tank. It left about 10 - 12 gallons of water in the tank at all times. That was what made it so hard to get all the pink stuff out of the tank in the spring. It's also the reason why the water was always nasty, even after we drained it and refilled with fresh water. The fresh water was just being diluted with the bad water.

            I ended up re-plumbing the tank internally by adding a PVC pipe that extended all the way back to the lowest point of the tank. Now we are able to completely drain the tank after each outing. We no longer have water sitting in the tank getting stale while we aren't using the boat. It has made a huge difference in the water quality and was worth every bit of the effort.

            Maybe this approach will solve your problems too.

            A further benefit is that we don't need to use pink stuff to winterize the system anymore. We just drain the water heater, water tank and blow out the lines with compressed air.

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks for the tip. I need to clean out my water tank.

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                #8
                belandd wrote:
                Thanks for the tip. I need to clean out my water tank.
                I used 1 cup of chlorine bleach in my 30 gallon tank. Let sit for a day. emptied and flushed. Then I place 3 Tablespoons of bleach each time i fill up. Water is great. We use it for washing dishes and brushing teeth. We still drink bottled water while on board though.
                Tony, Cape Cod, MA
                Vice Commodore Bourne Yacht Club
                1994 Carver 390 Cockpit Motor Yacht
                454 Merc Cruisers inboards
                "HOLODECK"
                2014 10' hard bottomed Dink powered by 3.3HP Mariner 2 stroke
                www.bourneyachtclub.com

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                  #9
                  R&Jonthebay;

                  I like your idea of accessing the water tank to install clean-out ports and a rear water pick up.

                  Can you expand on the details of that project?

                  How many, where and what size for the ports, and the way the long PCV line was supported inside the tank so that it didn't sag.

                  I have a plastic water tank and so making the holes isn't a problem.

                  Dave

                  Comment


                    #10
                    DaveA wrote:
                    R&Jonthebay;

                    I like your idea of accessing the water tank to install clean-out ports and a rear water pick up.

                    Can you expand on the details of that project?

                    How many, where and what size for the ports, and the way the long PVC line was supported inside the tank so that it didn't sag.

                    I have a plastic water tank and so making the holes isn't a problem.

                    Dave
                    Dave,

                    My tank is aluminum. It is about a foot tall, two feet wide and 90--something long. It has two baffles inside it that divide the tank into thirds.

                    I cut three round holes in the top of the tank, one for each section, front, middle and rear. I used 3-- 8" round water tight deck plates from West Marine as closures for the holes. I wanted as large a hole as possible so I could get my arm into the tank and be able to reach everywhere.

                    The top surface of the tank was not flat. It made the plastic deck plates warp when I tried to bolt them down. That made it impossible to screw the lids in and get a seal. To fix the problem, I got a piece of 1/4" thick aluminum and cut three 12" x 12" squares out of it. I cut 8" holes in them and then bolted (stainless Steel bolts) them to the top of the tank so that they lined up with the holes I had previously cut. I applied a very large bead of 4200 caulk between the tank and the plates so that it squeezed out around the inside of the hole and sealed the joint between the two.That gave me a flat surface to mount the deck plates to. After the caulk had dried, I caulked and bolted the plates into place.

                    At first, I was happy that I had been able to clean the inside of the tank. I was also happy that I could now periodically vacuum out the water that the pump wouldn't drain. This would help keep the water fresh during the season and make winterizing easier. .......Then I got to thinking. (That's always a dangerous thing. )

                    I thought, if I could re-plumb the tank so that the pump picked up the water from the low end, I wouldn't need to open the tank as often to drain it. The problem was, there wasn't much room around the tank to be able to drill the hole, attach a fitting and run pipe back to the pump. I would need to cut the tie down straps loose and lift the tank out of the chamber it was in. That was going to cause problems on the other end where the fill hose and existing pick up fitting was attached. Then I realized I could run pipe to the end of the tank from the inside.

                    This didn't end up being as easy as I had hoped. There was just a small flange on the inside part of the pick up fitting and the hole in it was an odd size. I couldn't find a fitting that fit into it. I ended up turning down one end of a PVC, hose to hose barb connector on my lathe so it fit into the hole. I glued it into place with some Marine Tex epoxy. I then used a piece of vinyl tubing to connect the barb fitting to a piece of 1/2" PVC pipe that was extended across the width of the tank to the far wall. This was necessary so that the pipe could pass between the baffles and the side of the tank. A 90* fitting then let me run pipe to the back of the tank. The baffles in the tank are solid aluminum panels that are welded to the top and bottom. They don't run all the way to the side of the tank, leaving about a two inch space between them.

                    At the end of the tank I installed another 90* on the pipe and ran it back across the tank to the other wall. The pipe was capped and a 1/2" notch was cut in the bottom of it so that it picked up water from the underside. Drawing the water from the underside of the pipe insures that the tank is drained completely. Only a cup or two of water is left when the pump runs dry. All the plumbing in the tank is either captured by the baffles or wedged in place by being run across the tank side to side. The pipe also lays on the bottom of the tank. It can't move.

                    Hope this helped.

                    Reed

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                      #11
                      One more thing.....it wasn't my idea..........

                      I think it was mmichellich that posted about doing his that inspired me.

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                        #12
                        Great information Reed!

                        Sounds like a nice winter project coming up for me. The worst part is probably fighting with the mattress to get it out of the way. . .

                        I would assume that there are baffles in the plastic tanks too, which will force the water lines to be redirectedy around the tank internally.

                        Dave

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