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    #16
    I think its a bit of stretch to say the number one thing you can do to make a manicooler fail is over prop.....

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      #17
      "kev_rm" post=824632 wrote:
      I think its a bit of stretch to say the number one thing you can do to make a manicooler fail is over prop.....
      They were two items not necessarily in priority order but perhaps you have yet to see the results of corrosion issues from an overheating EH700.

      I believe that it is also possible your experience is so far limited to the NA engine - the turbo versions have the ability to impart much more heat as well.

      Summary - Add contaminants to the coolant and/or overheat the manicooler and that's the easiest way to make them fail.

      Doing both can easily expedited the failure . (except for a sledge hammer)
      Northport NY

      Comment


        #18
        "tgotch" post=824572 wrote:
        This is my first foray into Diesel, and motoryacht, so I am trying to educate myself.

        I have not seen the boat, but may go look at it soon. He has sent me an insurance survey from 2 years ago, plus pics.

        Boat has ~1800 hours. Owner stated he does his own maintenance.

        I posted the owner's comments. Feel free to comment.
        Price of the boat means a lot. if you have to pay 75G then putting 10 G in it then not so good, but if you pay 35G then putting 10 in it makes more sense. as your org post about not changing antifreeze , its easy to ck just pull off the end cap of the mani and Look.
        1988 3270
        135 hinos
        Seldovia ALASKA
        KEVINS UPHOLSTERY
        KEVINSBOATTOPS.COM
        Marine canvas/Upholstery
        since 1975

        Comment


          #19
          The Hinos are great engines but neglect knows no bounds.

          The 4588 is a nice boat, I'm familiar with that model as we have a family member we cruise with who has one.

          With that said; give strong consideration to the price your willing to pay and what the vessel may realistically need.

          This being your first big boat don't under estimate the cost of repairs, maintenance and updating/improvements.

          It requires commitment and being well funded but the price would have to be pretty good to take such a risk considering what you have stated so far.

          All the best and hope you have found the right boat.

          Cheers!
          1995 Bayliner 3587
          Twin Hino 250HP
          Located In Sidney BC, Canada

          Comment


            #20
            Thanks for all the info. A lot to digest

            The boat is located in the midwest. It has been on the hard (indoors) for 2 years. It is currently priced about $20k-$30k below other 4588's on YW/Trader.

            There was an insurance survey on it from 2 years ago. Nothing major was noted. But it was winterized, so no system checks.

            I planned on sinking ~$20k into it for updates (electronics, soft goods, etc.) But now with the discovery of the Antifreeze issue, I am rethinking. This (and risers, etc.) could easily add another $20k to the project.

            I spoke with Earl, which was helpful.

            Comment


              #21
              FWIW - In the last half dozen years I have begun seeing boats this size that I would not take for 'free'.

              Neglected maintenance for enough years can add up to well over $50K easy - its not too hard to get there if its really been neglected.

              Sitting on the hard for 2 years straight adds another whole list to look for. I have learned this ....

              The cheapest deals are never the best deals and the best deals are never the cheapest.

              If you pursue this boat it would be best to post back with a huge amount of information about the hull, fuel, maintenance schedule and how all the systems checked out.
              Northport NY

              Comment


                #22
                I am the owner of the 4588 Bayliner located in Northern Minnesota and used on Lake of the Woods for the last 12 years that all the discussion is about. The 4588 was purchased by me in 2005. I have replaced many items like most of you to keep up the boat up so all system work as good or better than when I purchased the Yacht. I have done a few unique changes to the yacht such as replacing the 500 racors with 1000 racors on both Hino engines with vacuum gauges on top o racors. I use a 2 micron filter cartridge which keeps fuel oil nice and clean at injectors I also added huge bypass filters sold by Amsoil on both Hino engines. Model EaBP110. The canister is 10.5" by 4.25 diameter and holds 2 quarts of oil. By the end of short season, 3 month, the oil is still clean like a gas car engine with 1000 miles on oil. It is amazing for a diesel engine.

                Fresh water yachts do not have the potential problems as salt water boats due to electrolysis and many other things salt water can do to a yacht over time. The yacht has been stored inside a cool building in Summer for the last two years far from salt water air. When in the water at private dock for 3 month each year the shore power was never left on unless I was staying on the boat at the dock which was about 20 days a year. I was cruising for maybe 25 days a year. There was no other boat using dock that had shore power. There is nothing wrong with risers or manicooler salt water is the problem with risers and manicoolers. Next spring when I put the yacht in the water after ice is out it will run just great. RPM's will go right up to 3000 rpm's if I want to run hard. No need to mess with injectors. It is true I have not changed the impellers in 12 years. They are still the same impellers when I purchased the yacht. I do check them every year by taking off the side plate and they look fine. I think I will change them for the fun of it next spring. I have read impellers can go in about three years when used in salt water. Just one of the many benefits of fresh water yachting. I am sure anti freeze that I did change 12 years ago is just fine also, but I will change that this fall and drain the old orange anti freeze into a glass jug to see how it looks. If you want to see how orange the orange anti freeze still looks I could post a picture. If any of you leave your shore power on all year round I would worry about that. I think there is an inspection plate on the side of manicoolers I could take off to inspect some pipes and send you some pictures of what they look like. Nice I am sure.

                Comment


                • Sunbird
                  Sunbird commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Bigger Dog,
                  It is best to test the anti freeze with a ph test strip. You can buy them on the internet or auto supply stores. The ph value is what will cause chemical degradation of the manicoolers. Mine was about 4 years old on a fresh water boat and it was tested as very acidic.visual observation of color does not tell you much.

                #23
                "bigger dog" post=824971 wrote:
                I am the owner of the 4588 Bayliner located in Northern Minnesota and used on Lake of the Woods for the last 12 years that all the discussion is about. The 4588 was purchased by me in 2005. I have replaced many items like most of you to keep up the boat up so all system work as good or better than when I purchased the Yacht. I have done a few unique changes to the yacht such as replacing the 500 racors with 1000 racors on both Hino engines with vacuum gauges on top o racors. I use a 2 micron filter cartridge which keeps fuel oil nice and clean at injectors I also added huge bypass filters sold by Amsoil on both Hino engines. Model EaBP110. The canister is 10.5" by 4.25 diameter and holds 2 quarts of oil. By the end of short season, 3 month, the oil is still clean like a gas car engine with 1000 miles on oil. It is amazing for a diesel engine.

                Fresh water yachts do not have the potential problems as salt water boats due to electrolysis and many other things salt water can do to a yacht over time. The yacht has been stored inside a cool building in Summer for the last two years far from salt water air. When in the water at private dock for 3 month each year the shore power was never left on unless I was staying on the boat at the dock which was about 20 days a year. I was cruising for maybe 25 days a year. There was no other boat using dock that had shore power. There is nothing wrong with risers or manicooler salt water is the problem with risers and manicoolers. Next spring when I put the yacht in the water after ice is out it will run just great. RPM's will go right up to 3000 rpm's if I want to run hard. No need to mess with injectors. It is true I have not changed the impellers in 12 years. They are still the same impellers when I purchased the yacht. I do check them every year by taking off the side plate and they look fine. I think I will change them for the fun of it next spring. I have read impellers can go in about three years when used in salt water. Just one of the many benefits of fresh water yachting. I am sure anti freeze that I did change 12 years ago is just fine also, but I will change that this fall and drain the old orange anti freeze into a glass jug to see how it looks. If you want to see how orange the orange anti freeze still looks I could post a picture. If any of you leave your shore power on all year round I would worry about that. I think there is an inspection plate on the side of manicoolers I could take off to inspect some pipes and send you some pictures of what they look like. Nice I am sure.
                Hello and welcome....

                Great to hear , please continue to add to your data as a valuable selling point....

                - total hours on the mains

                - which exact genset do you have

                - total hours on the genset

                Mains last checked/serviced/changed

                - injectors

                - injection timing

                - head retorque

                - turbo's

                - intercooolers

                - risers

                - trans coolers

                - Manicoolers

                - oil centrifuges

                - raw water pups cams and wear plates

                - hoses and belts

                genset

                - exhaust elbow

                - injectors

                - head retorque

                - valves

                - raw water pump

                - on engine fuel filters (2)

                Running gear

                - cutlass bearings

                - prop scans

                - thru hulls

                - bottom paint and type

                - packing gland types and service (prop and rudder)

                Please add any other boat related typical wear items such as ...

                - water heater

                - holding tank

                - water tanks and senders

                - fuel tanks and gages

                - prop pitch X diameter X number of blades and material

                - batteries and chargers

                Please consider advertising your boat on the BOC in the boats for sale section. If you do please consider taking as many hi res digital phots as possible and place a link in the advertisement to show off your boats best points - especially the mechanical systems.
                Northport NY

                Comment


                  #24
                  Anyone tell me which antifreeze to use on a Hino Wo6d? I’ve seen some use the pink stuff orange and the likes. The manual on Hino says it’s blue?
                  does it matter?

                  Comment


                    #25
                    Welcome! Depends a bit on what color you have now. Coolants have advanced a lot since these engines were produced. Earl Summerville, who truly is the Bayliner Guru, advised me to use the NAPA Heavy Duty Truck coolant certified fo Cummins.
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	81B5C6B5-7D11-477D-864B-A59A87ADC98E.jpg
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ID:	637662 I use the concentrate and dilute it 50/50 with distilled water.

                    Obviously you need to flush the system well, and the coolant change schedule is a bit opinion based. Initially frequent changes were needed to flush any remaining casting sand from the system. After this length of time and the number of coolant changes, that shouldn’t be an issue. The next risk is the chemical balance, the ph, needs to be maintained. That’s easily monitored with test strips and a trend line developed. I change mine every two years, however, I use the boat nearly year round and put a lot of hours on it. 850 hours in five years on the mains.
                    P/C Pete
                    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                    MMSI 367770440

                    Comment


                      #26
                      How would one go about flushing the antifreeze side of the system ?

                      Comment


                        #27
                        I disconnected a hose going to the hot water heater on the port engine, and a hose going to the red dot cabin heater on the starboard engine, then I made an adapter from some 5/8 hose, a water hose repair fitting (female), a piece of copper tube and a couple of hose clamps. Leave the manicooler cap in place, hook everything together, connect it to a garden hose and turn the hose on at a LOW pressure. Remember, the system runs at only seven psi. Let the water run until it’s clear, shut the water off, lower the open end of the hose as far as possible and let it drain until it stops, restore the original connection go to the other engine. When that’s done, drain the manicooler and block, install your fresh 50/50 mix.
                        P/C Pete
                        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                        MMSI 367770440

                        Comment


                          #28
                          Thanks pcpete.
                          Could that same procedure be performed with the thermostat removed, there by flushing block also? Or is the block flushed as well, with the thermostat in place?
                          Can that procedure be used to "pump" antifreeze in to the block and hoses going to each heater, all at the same time? Hopefully minimizing any chance for air lock?

                          Comment


                            #29
                            I did it with the thermostat in place relying on the bypass to clear the block. Again, relatively slow flow from the hose. Yes, you can get a significant amount of the coolant into the system, but it won’t be full.
                            P/C Pete
                            Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                            1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                            Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                            MMSI 367770440

                            Comment

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