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Prepping For Irma: Which Battery Are Bilge Pumps On?-gctid823609

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    Prepping For Irma: Which Battery Are Bilge Pumps On?-gctid823609

    We are currently in Marathon, FL - which leaves us square in the path of the oncoming Irma.

    We are working now to prep our 4788 to leave behind at a marina dock while we evacuate to the mainland - and I am trying to figure out how to maximize the potential bilge pump running time.

    Looking at the (poor quality) schematic I found online, it looks as if the 4788 automatic bilge pumps are wired directly to the engine starting battery. Is this correct? Which one - Port or Starboard?

    Is there an easy way to let the bilge pumps tap into the house battery as well?

    Any other tips for securing a 4788 for a major hurricane hit?

    Thanks,

    - Chris
    Chris & Cherie - www.technomadia.com
    "Y-Not" - 1999 Bayliner 4788
    "Zephyr" - 1961 GM PD4106 Vintage Bus RV Conversion

    Full-Time nomads since 2006.
    Now spending half of each year slowly doing the Great Loop in our 4788!

    #2
    The bilge pumps are typically wired directly to your starter batteries. Not the house bank. A PO could have changed this. You could always add a few batteries to your starter bank. I am typically more worried about the wind and storm surge then the rain water getting in the bilge.

    For hurricane prep, talk to your neighbors, but this is what I do before I leave:

    Double all lines. Add extra spring lines both sides

    Take down all canvas.

    Take off all shore power connections

    Turn off all D.C. and AC power

    Remove all food from fridge

    Fenders against all pilings

    Drop anchor

    Verify all auto bilge pumps are work/test the float switches.

    Hope it heads out to sea.
    1997 3788/Cummins 6BTA 5.9 M2s (Sold)
    2003 Silverton 42c/Cummins 480CEs
    2019 Cobia 240 CC
    2006 Boston Whaler 13 Sport
    1985 3270/Hino 135s (Sold)

    Vero Beach, Fl.

    Comment


      #3
      EDIT: Deleted. You've made it clear you're not looking for advice on other platforms.

      Good luck.

      Comment


        #4
        IMO , run as far north and inland as you can and have it hauled, the docks in the keys are going under water for sure .

        I am concerned about my Tampa bay winter house getting wet

        [color=][/color]
        1988 3270
        135 hinos
        Seldovia ALASKA
        KEVINS UPHOLSTERY
        KEVINSBOATTOPS.COM
        Marine canvas/Upholstery
        since 1975

        Comment


          #5
          You should have a battery selector switch on a panel, probably in the engine room. I *believe* (although I'm not positive) that if you set the selector switch to A+B, that would link the starting and house battery, and essentially give the bilge pumps twice as much run time. Of course, if the bilge pumps drain both batteries, you can't start the engines without recharging them first. Someone please correct me if I've mis-spoken on this (I have a 38xx rather than a 47xx).

          Dave

          Comment


            #6
            "Technomadia" post=823609 wrote:
            We are currently in Marathon, FL - which leaves us square in the path of the oncoming Irma.

            We are working now to prep our 4788 to leave behind at a marina dock while we evacuate to the mainland - and I am trying to figure out how to maximize the potential bilge pump running time.

            Looking at the (poor quality) schematic I found online, it looks as if the 4788 automatic bilge pumps are wired directly to the engine starting battery. Is this correct? Which one - Port or Starboard?

            Is there an easy way to let the bilge pumps tap into the house battery as well?

            Any other tips for securing a 4788 for a major hurricane hit?

            Thanks,

            - Chris
            Chris, in the cupboard on left entry to salon, you can turn the rotary switches one at a time to then test if the bilge pumps are connected to either the start batteries or house battery. But I wouldn't be worried about your bilge pumps. If it was me, I'd be high tailing it outta there up to Fort Myers or Cape Coral. It's only a days trek. It's a lottery what direction Irma will take, but the West Coast certainly provides better protection.

            Best wishes. Cheers
            John H
            Brisbane QLD Aust
            "Harbor-nating"

            2000 - 4788/Cummins 370's

            Comment


              #7
              I'm not a boat/hurricane expert but you guys need to stop worrying about bilge pumps and get the hell out of there. The current track is almost dead at you and they just announced as of 7:13AM DST that Irma is at 150 MPH headed to a Cat 5. Move north out of the path seems like the logical move to me.

              Update it just went to Cat 5 at 170+ MPH
              Charleston, S.C.

              Comment


                #8
                I know nothing about hurricanes, but I agree with everyone else, your priority is getting your family to a safer place!

                If you insist on doing prep work, I would:

                [ul]

                [li]remove everything from your exterior decks that may block a drain[/li]

                [li]ensure your drains are clear and clean[/li]

                [li]duct tape shut all hatches (watertight seal)[/li]

                [li]drop as many fenders and tie as many dock lines as you can[/li]

                [/ul]

                If your bilge pumps are working, accept it and move on, don't try improve or monkey with that system. Focus on keeping water out. Maybe setting the battery switch to A+B to maximize pump runtime? I have zero experience with tropical storms.

                Comment


                  #9
                  "Sportscar" post=823700 wrote:
                  I'm not a boat/hurricane expert but you guys need to stop worrying about bilge pumps and get the hell out of there. The current track is almost dead at you and they just announced as of 7:13AM DST that Irma is at 150 MPH headed to a Cat 5. Move north out of the path seems like the logical move to me.

                  Update it just went to Cat 5 at 170+ MPH
                  +1 to this. I've lived on the gulf coast for nearly 30 years and know a few things about hurricanes (we just went through Harvey). Given where you are, the strength and forecasted path of this storm, I would try to get the hell out of there. Best guess at this point would say head up the east coast of FL if you can find a safe spot there. The storm doesn't really arrive until Saturday so you have a few days. If you left tomorrow, you could probably make it to Jacksonville and get into the river away from the coast.

                  If you elect to stay, contact your insurance company and make sure you've complied with all of the conditions on your policy.
                  Evan
                  2001 Bayliner 4788 "Fifty / Fifty II"
                  League City, TX

                  Comment


                    #10
                    From what I understand of Irma and it's current strength, you could throw 10 bilge pumps into the boat and it may not help.

                    I would be firing up the boat and heading hell-bent-for-leather up to the Tampa area....PRONTO.

                    I would not expect the boat to survive a Cat 5 Hurricane strike.
                    Matt Train
                    BOC Site Team
                    Chicagoland, IL

                    Comment


                      #11
                      We live right between Tampa and Orlando, will decide Friday to GET OUT OF DODGE or not. Forget about running up the east coast, as thats the strongest side of any storm. The west coast of Fl from Naples up to and just above Tampa is forecasted to get hit. Either leave the boat and save your self or head for Pensacola or FtWalton/Destin.

                      In 2004 we had the eye of Charlie come within 8 miles of our home before veering off towards Orlando. Winds were at 110 mph constant for a hr, 75-90 mph for 2 hrs. In1992 I went down to Homestead the day after Andrew went thru..... complete devastation! This past spring Iproff and I went on a short vacation to Marathon, a Cat 4 will wipe it out off the map, a Cat 5..OMG!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Pray your insurance will replace your boat and drive NW as soon as you can.
                        Started boating 1965
                        Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                        Comment


                          #13
                          If it's not too late I would head south to Belize if you have the time speed and fuel to make it. There was a couple on here that went from Marathon to there but they got fuel in Cuba. The storm will head north not south. If a Cat 5 hits Marathon straight on there won't be much left.

                          Ken

                          If you leave it there and head north take ownership insurance and your maintenance books with you.
                          300SD all options sold.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            FYI - we never had any intention of trying to ride out the storm aboard in Marathon, and we took advantage of loaner truck to get out of the Keys so that we can at the very least make sure that our other home (our bus) is safe.

                            So that is where we are now... We spent yesterday getting the boat as secure as could be, and now we are in Melbourne, FL prepping our bus to travel further north.

                            Hopefully our boat will still be floating when we get back to her.

                            Here is our latest post on our evacuation:

                            http://www.technomadia.com/2017/09/h...status-update/

                            Stay safe everyone!

                            - Chris
                            Chris & Cherie - www.technomadia.com
                            "Y-Not" - 1999 Bayliner 4788
                            "Zephyr" - 1961 GM PD4106 Vintage Bus RV Conversion

                            Full-Time nomads since 2006.
                            Now spending half of each year slowly doing the Great Loop in our 4788!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Here's a video on how well a Marina did at St Martin.

                              Glad your safe and you can always buy another boat.

                              http://www.express.co.uk/news/weathe...astation-video

                              Ken
                              300SD all options sold.

                              Comment

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