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What props for 3288 with gas engines?-gctid819685

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    What props for 3288 with gas engines?-gctid819685

    I have a 3288 with twin 351 (235hp) v8 gas engines. I am using the props that came with the boat but have no idea what the specs are beyond they are three blade. I do not think I have the most efficient match for these engines.

    What props are other people running? Is anyone running 4 blade props?

    Any recommendations?

    Larry

    #2
    The props should be stamped with their diameter and pitch, eg; 17x19. Even if they've been reworked, the prop shop should have xxx'd out the original and restamped with the new dimensions. First thing to do is make sure the boat can run the engines up to WOT RPM with those props. If you can achieve WOT plus 100-200 rpm, the props are correct for the load. If you can't achieve WOT RPM's, the props are too big, too far over WOT RPM's not enough prop. Check the prop markiings, and then check with a prop shop with that data for the correct size 4 blade. Get a price from them for the new 4 blade props of the correct size, then pick yourself up off the floor and have a beer

    James
    1989 Bayliner 3888, 175 Hinos,
    Hurth 630's Onan 8kw MDKD
    Lowrance Electronics!
    Boating on Georgian Bay & the North Channel
    Completed the Great Loop 07/25/19
    AGLCA #8340
    MTOA# 7469

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      #3
      I was quoted $3000 CAD for new props after dinging them pretty hard. Luckily I was able to get them fixed for $750. Mine are four blade 17x15.
      "Martini's Law"
      1986 Bayliner 3270, 110 Hino's
      Nova Scotia, Canada

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        #4
        Standard set up was three blade 16x14. Those should work well up to 4000 ft or so above that you should go down. We run 16x11 and boat at 7000ft.

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          #5
          I think the best props are the ones you have. How fast are you at WOT. I have older 225 horse and hit 28 MPH when the tanks are near empty and wind at my back.

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            #6
            First..thanks for the replies.

            I will check the numbers when I pull the boat in October for the winter. I can get just over 4200 rpm (I think red line is 4400) loaded with full fuel and water, top speed is 20 knots by GPS. I can get about 7.5 knots at 2000 but only 8.5 at 2600. I was wondering if a 4 blade prop would give me better speed between 2000 and 2600 rpm? I am looking for something that will run reasonably between 8 and 10 knots with chewing up fuel.

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              #7
              If you are running your boat full of fuel and water, you may have found your issue. Try testing empty.

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                #8
                Mine also has 16 x 14 three blade props. I cruise at about 16 knots at 3500 rpm with full down tabs to lift the stern. I'm curious if 4 blades would prvide more stern lift; anybody tried this with 351s?
                Edmonds Yacht Club
                1992 3288 Motoryacht
                351 Windsors

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                  #9
                  For what it's worth, I went from a 3 blade to a 4 blade alum on my C;/C. The 4 blade was what the boathouse I bought it from said was the closest in pitch and that the most noticeable changes would most likely be a slight drop in top speed (41 down to 39 actual tests with everything same same in boat, weather and sea conditions) but the bonus change which (as predicted) was great was that it provided more torque getting her on plane quicker and the rare times I did, got a skier out of the water quicker, both translating to fuel savings. The sounds I boated in were quite shallow out of the channels so at the boathouses recommendation I went with alum instead of S/S. I asked what effect blade "flex with the alum would have. Was told negligible, But if I went with S/S and hit a stump or other obstacle the s/s probably wouldn't bend/ break like the alum thus transferring that force on to the outboard, breaking something way more costly. My 2655 has a 3 blade s/s prop and I'm pondering doing a swap with an alum 4 blade since I'll eventually be back to those same waters and adventuring southward, anchoring out and sitting much lower in the water.
                  Dave
                  Restoring/ upgrading: 1990 Ciera Sunbridge 2655 ST, "One Particular Harbour"
                  5.7 Mercruiser Alpha 1 Gen 1 (my floating retirement villa if it doesn't kill me first)
                  Sold:
                  1995 SeaPro 210 C/C "Hydro-Therapy"
                  Mariner 150
                  Towing with:
                  2002 Ford F 350 7.3L Super Duty
                  Near High Rock Lake, N.C.

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                    #10
                    Your best fuel economy will be below 8 knots.
                    Started boating 1965
                    Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

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                      #11
                      Best fuel is under 8 knots at about 26 L per hour, around 6 us gal per hour. For the distances I sometimes need to cover 10 knots would be a perfect running speed but of course fuel usages goes up considerably.

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