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Charging on the hook-gctid819456

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    Charging on the hook-gctid819456

    Do you run the gunny a few hours a day to charge the house batteries or wait til they are down to 50%?

    We have been sitting in Montague for a week now.

    #2
    I like to charge at 65% which was the recommendation of a battery tech for my AGM lifeline batteries.
    Alan Teed
    MOONSHADOW
    1996 Wendon Sky Lounge 72'
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Previously:
    1994 Bayliner 4788
    2006 Hylas 49' SY
    Bayliner 2855
    1977 Cal 34' SY
    1981 Hunter 33' SY

    Comment


      #3
      Depends on how you are determining 50%. It can be done with a volt meter but you really need to know what you are doing.

      State of Charge

      Lead Acid Gel batter AGM battery

      100% 12.70+ 12.85+ 12.80+

      75% 12.40 12.65 12.60

      50% 12.20 12.35 12.30

      25% 12.00 12.00 12.00

      0% 11.80 11.80 11.80
      Started boating 1965
      Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

      Comment


        #4
        Your flooded batteries will last longer recharging at 65% than 50%, but your most efficient charging is bulk charging which is 50-85%. After that you are on absorb charge and burning the same diesel for less charge.
        1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

        Comment


          #5
          So how and where do you assess state of current charge? I have an inverter panel and a voltage meter on the electrical panel.

          I presume it's the inverter panel and hit 'meter' it's a Magnum inverter
          BLOG ABOUT MY BOAT... www.seattleboater.com
          5788 Man 610's- Love Her !
          Sold:Bayliner 3587 | Extended Hull

          Comment


            #6
            The Magnum can be set to percentage of state of charge. But it has to be set properly to reflect your battery bank capacity. It's all in the manual.
            1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

            Comment


              #7
              I have 4 x 100w solar panels, a 30A MPPT charge controller, an ACR, a Xantrex Linklite battery monitor, 4 deep cycle golf cart batteries and 2 start batteries. The ACR ensures all 6 batteries charge during sunny days. It's unusual to see my house system fall below 70% and can usually reach 100% by early afternoon. I don't own a generator and never will.

              I can go multiple weeks on the hook without any requirement to recharge my batteries. For about 9 months of the year I can also avoid needing to plug my boat into shore power while moored at my marina (until I need to run a space heater). Saves me about $180/yr in electricity costs, keeps batteries charged to 100%. Once installed it is virtually maintenance free (cleaning bird poop and watering batteries excepted).

              I added the panels, charge controller and ACR to the boat after purchase. The Xantrex and batteries were already there.
              Terry
              1999 Bayliner 3388
              Twin Cummins 4BTA
              Fisherman, Cruiser, Boaticus-enthusiasticus-maximus
              Member Royal Victoria Yacht Club

              Comment


                #8
                How do you get hot water?
                1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

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                  #9
                  On the hook now. I've been charging twice a day for 2 to 3 hrs each time. This is all new to me. I've been trying to not go below 80% soc and it still takes min 2 to 3 hrs and sometimes I still don't get to 100% soc. trying to figure this all out but considering adding solar panels too to eliminate one of the generator cycles per day. Not looking forward to yacht club raft up with noisy genny ruining solitude for everyone else twice daily.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    "Uncle Bob" post=819531 wrote:
                    How do you get hot water?
                    Propane on demand heater.
                    Terry
                    1999 Bayliner 3388
                    Twin Cummins 4BTA
                    Fisherman, Cruiser, Boaticus-enthusiasticus-maximus
                    Member Royal Victoria Yacht Club

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Redskyjoe: You're charging on absorb charge then float charge. Very inefficient. Ensure your charger settings match the battery bank and forget about reaching 100 %. As I mentioned above, your most efficient charging is between 50 and 85%. But, the settings have to be correct. Your numbers suggest your settings are incorrect.
                      1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

                      Comment


                        #12
                        "Uncle Bob" post=819542 wrote:
                        Redskyjoe: You're charging on absorb charge then float charge. Very inefficient. Ensure your charger settings match the battery bank and forget about reaching 100 %. As I mentioned above, your most efficient charging is between 50 and 85%. But, the settings have to be correct. Your numbers suggest your settings are incorrect.
                        I was under the impression that flooded lead-acid batteries should not be discharged below 80% if you want to keep maximum life cycles. So I have been trying to charge before it gets below 80% which happens twice per day. Obviously I need to do some more research on this. I appreciate your input.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Our 4087 has no genset, so we use a Honda 2000. We were at Montague for 3 days on the hook and we run 30 min for hot water. Then another 1:30min once a day for inverter (4 x 6volt) and house 12volt AGM).

                          This brings my Inverter up to 13.x volts and my house to 100%. I never let inverter go below 12.00v, or house battery below about 60%. I can charge inverter and house together, but can't do water at same time, Honda just won't take it.

                          As an aside, I always have engines running when I use dinghy davit or windlass of course. My inverter batteries are 2011 and the AGM is 9+. To speed water heating I have run the starboard engine for 15 min, then the Honda for about 5 min.

                          Mm, thank you for the chart I've done a copy and paste into my notes!

                          Machog
                          1996 4087 Lazy Days
                          2011 11’ West Marine Rib 350 Lazy Mac
                          2011 Porsche Cayman
                          2010 Lexus IS 250C
                          2008 Honda Ridgeline

                          Comment


                            #14
                            "Machog" post=819575 wrote:
                            Our 4087 has no genset, so we use a Honda 2000. We were at Montague for 3 days on the hook and we run 30 min for hot water. Then another 1:30min once a day for inverter (4 x 6volt) and house 12volt AGM).

                            This brings my Inverter up to 13.x volts and my house to 100%. I never let inverter go below 12.00v, or house battery below about 60%. I can charge inverter and house together, but can't do water at same time, Honda just won't take it.

                            As an aside, I always have engines running when I use dinghy davit or windlass of course. My inverter batteries are 2011 and the AGM is 9+. To speed water heating I have run the starboard engine for 15 min, then the Honda for about 5 min.

                            Mm, thank you for the chart I've done a copy and paste into my notes!

                            Machog
                            What times during the day did you run your Honda? And where did you place it while running, do you have pics? I'm about to take off on a cruise and am thinking about bringing my Honda 2000 for the same reason, I have 6 house batteries and no generator.
                            2001 3788 w/ 330 Cummins
                            Seattle, WA

                            Comment


                              #15
                              "Uncle Bob" post=819542 wrote:
                              Redskyjoe: You're charging on absorb charge then float charge. Very inefficient. Ensure your charger settings match the battery bank and forget about reaching 100 %. As I mentioned above, your most efficient charging is between 50 and 85%. But, the settings have to be correct. Your numbers suggest your settings are incorrect.
                              Something to note. If you're only charging your batteries up to 85% you are in fact losing 30% of your available power. Given that you want to keep the batteries above 50% discharged you're only using the capacity between 50 and 100%. So that capacity between 85% and 100% represents 30% of the available power not 15%.

                              To get that last 15% into your batteries more quickly, you have to raise the charging voltage. A good charger will allow you to set your charging voltage to 14.8 - 15V. Most 6v deep cycle batteries require much higher voltage to reach 100% charge. Trojan recommends 14.8V on their 6V batteries. It's like blowing up a tire to 35 PSI. You can probably do it with a bicycle pump but it would take you days, but if you do it with a compressor capable of exceeding 35PSI, you can do it much more quickly.
                              Terry
                              1999 Bayliner 3388
                              Twin Cummins 4BTA
                              Fisherman, Cruiser, Boaticus-enthusiasticus-maximus
                              Member Royal Victoria Yacht Club

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