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Which laptop chart plotter program should I buy?-gctid790474

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    #16
    I use Chart Navigator Pro, which I believe is the same, or similar to Coastal Explorer by Rose Point.

    I also have Nobeltec, but do not like it.

    I use a Big Bay marine pc with dual monitors, and a Garmin bridge mounted GPS receiver. I also have a small puck style GPS antenna as backup.

    We also have backup charting on laptops.
    Joel
    1987 3818 Hino 175
    "Knotty Girl"
    Prince Rupert B.C.

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      #17
      "mmichellich" post=790500 wrote:
      Buy a tablet WITH a built in GPS. We have two of them an LG and a Samsung using the Android system. Neither have a cell radio tho. I had to look hard to find tablets with built in GPS radios. Most electornics sales persons do not know anything about GPS and will lie to you. If you are looking at an Android tablet, go to the location settings and look for highest accuracy and you will find GPS or not. For Apple tablets I believe you have to find one that has a cell radio to get a GPS radio included.
      GSMArena will tell you if the tablet/phone has no GPS, GPS, or assisted GPS (A-GPS). GPS is ideal, as it will work anywhere in the world. GLONASS (Russian), BDS (Chinese), and Galileo (EU) are bonuses which can help improve accuracy. Assisted GPS requires a cellular connection in order to get an initial position fix (it relies on a cell tower computer to do the initial position calculations). If the device only has A-GPS, it will work as long as you start using it in range of a cell tower. After the initial position fix, you can travel out of range and it'll keep working. But reboot the device while out of range and it'll be useless.

      http://www.gsmarena.com/

      I get around the problem of no Internet connectivity on my tablet by rooting my phone and activating the WiFi hotspot feature. It turns your phone into a WiFi hotspot, allowing connected devices to use the phone's cellular Internet. The hotspot is built into all modern versions of Android, the carriers just disable it to try to make you pay more money. That should be illegal IMHO - you're already paying them for x GB of data each month. It's none of their business whether you decide to use that data on the phone, or on your tablet, or on your laptop.
      1994 2556, 350 MAG MPI Horizon, Bravo 2

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        #18
        "Solandri" post=790604 wrote:
        "mmichellich" post=790500 wrote:
        Buy a tablet WITH a built in GPS. We have two of them an LG and a Samsung using the Android system. Neither have a cell radio tho. I had to look hard to find tablets with built in GPS radios. Most electornics sales persons do not know anything about GPS and will lie to you. If you are looking at an Android tablet, go to the location settings and look for highest accuracy and you will find GPS or not. For Apple tablets I believe you have to find one that has a cell radio to get a GPS radio included.
        GSMArena will tell you if the tablet/phone has no GPS, GPS, or assisted GPS (A-GPS). GPS is ideal, as it will work anywhere in the world. GLONASS (Russian), BDS (Chinese), and Galileo (EU) are bonuses which can help improve accuracy. Assisted GPS requires a cellular connection in order to get an initial position fix (it relies on a cell tower computer to do the initial position calculations). If the device only has A-GPS, it will work as long as you start using it in range of a cell tower. After the initial position fix, you can travel out of range and it'll keep working. But reboot the device while out of range and it'll be useless.

        http://www.gsmarena.com/

        I get around the problem of no Internet connectivity on my tablet by rooting my phone and activating the WiFi hotspot feature. It turns your phone into a WiFi hotspot, allowing connected devices to use the phone's cellular Internet. The hotspot is built into all modern versions of Android, the carriers just disable it to try to make you pay more money. That should be illegal IMHO - you're already paying them for x GB of data each month. It's none of their business whether you decide to use that data on the phone, or on your tablet, or on your laptop.
        This assumes you have a cell signal. Many places we cruise has no cell service.
        Started boating 1965
        Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

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          #19
          GPS is installed on all iPads that include cellular service, but a cell signal is not required for accurate GPS usage. A cell signal might find GPS satellites a few seconds faster than without, on startup, but not required.
          "Impasse". 2001 3988
          Cummins 330's
          Puget Sound

          "You don't want to be the richest guy in the nursing home..."

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            #20
            I love the Navionics ($50/yr) product on my IPAD. Easy to use, will allow you to set min depth requirements for your boat and has an auto route function thats amazing but still allows you to make course modifications. Also, to cure limited gps, buy "bad elf" from amazon ($75-125$). Bad elf picks up up to 13 satellites, is free to use and will plug into you iPad or phone. You may need electrical USB connection in the bridge area as these will drain the iPad in about 2 hrs.

            This was one of the best (and cheapest) fixes I made.

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              #21
              I use Maxsea Timezero. It is the same as Nobeltec (different package, same software). It integrates with the Furuno navnet 3d (and tztouch). This allows it to both use the radar and control it, share routes, etc. This also integrates activecaptain data and shares my entire nmea networks (both 0183 and n2k).

              On my ipad I use Charts and Tides, by Navimatics. It integrates activecaptain as well. I am working on getting my nmea data to broadcast over the IP network and show up on the ipad as well.

              I also have a Panasonic Toughbook Windows tablet that I use to replicate the screen from the primary computer. This has a 1000nit daylight display for use in direct sunlight. I bought an older model on craigslist for a few hundred dollars. Its only purpose is to show what the primary computer is displaying, using a program such as VNC I can now see my full nav software (and control it, but much harder to do on the little display) from anywhere.

              I prefer to use software with more functionality than I need (Maxsea/Nobeltec) as it allows me to expand my use as my experience grows and to add more sensors/data inputs as my system grows. For now I can control/see the radar, ais transceiver, heading sensor, autopilot and vhf from either the computer or the mfd. As I add more sensors (tach, tank levels, wind, etc. to the network they will integrate into the mfd/computer and be available system wide.)
              2000 Bayliner 4788 "Perfect Balance"
              370HP Cummins
              Zodiac YL 340 30HP Nissan
              Moored at Roche Harbor

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                #22
                For those of you that have an iPad or a tablet without GPS

                You can add an external GPS that is Bluetooth such as bad elf. Just check software compatibility.

                I use an iPad mini with bad elf and Navionics.

                It works great.

                Ron
                1989 3218
                1988 Boston Whaler 13 Super Sport Limited
                2007 Yamaha VX Cruiser

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                  #23
                  I use Maptec on my lap top and it works just great. The only problem I find is that you have to update the tide information each year. And they don't do it for free.
                  Just love being on my 3870............Bill
                  1985 3870
                  Twin 130 Mits. not turbo charged
                  Name of boat is "Plenty Of Fish"
                  Live on board full time.
                  North Myrtle Beach, SC

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                    #24
                    "boatworkfl" post=790544 wrote:
                    If you have an android device try Marine Navigator by Ronald K? on play store. it is not fancy but you can download marine charts from NOAA has waypoints and more.

                    Works on phones and tablets.

                    I use it in Alaska salt water.
                    Thats what I have been using the last 5 years or so. It works great on a smart phone just stuck to the windshield with side grips on a suction mount. As long as you keep that tinywn red boaty lookin thing away from them rocky lookin things your are all set. for most folks purposes. I got robbed once paying for the full version supposedly working with my temp replacement phone which it didn't so I just used afterwards as I do now the free one. You have to load your own charts with the free verison off the NOAA site and it is a true PITA but can be done and you just have to dial up your own adjoining chart when you sail off the end of the earth. it's pretty simple though unless you are a real rover.

                    What it won't do at all is smaller lakes and streams which is why I am after something else just for that purpose.. Those NOAA charts are great and I much prefer the Raster layout to the newer electronic version just because of the detail they give you. Just remember if it's not a piece of water that is considered a Federal Navigable Waterway it won't show you any detail whatsoever.

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                      #25


                      This is a screenshot from ISailor which I have been using my Iphone and Ipad for several years now and really love it.

                      The App is free from the Itunes store.

                      US Charts are ~$15 and are a one time purchase with 3 or 4 updates per year. For the $15 I get Puget Sound and the San Juans, for $35 I have BC up past the north end of Vancouver Island. Getting BC charts for little or free is the real challenge of using a laptop, Canada charges dearly for them.

                      I also pay for an annual subscriptions from ISailor for internet based AIS for $15.99, Tides and Currents for $9.99 and US Pacific Coast Marina data for $0.99. Note in the picture the Seaspan Commodore east of Chatham Island. If you click on it you get speed, course, CPA etc plus a picture. The only thing that Isailor doesn't have that I would like is Active Captain.

                      You buy the charts and subscriptions for one device and they work for all of the IOS devices on your Itunes account, I have two Ipads and an Iphone all sharing the same data.

                      I do all of my route planning on one of my Ipads and then export them into DropBox. From there I can convert them into Raymarine files and also directly import them into OpenCpn. OpenCpn runs on my laptop connected to a portable AIS reciever, the advantage of OpenCpn is that it is free and easy to setup. US charts are free and OpenCPn supports nearly all electronic chart formats.

                      To be honest if it wasn't for the AIS receiver I would only use my Ipad and the boats Raymarines. The Ipad is so much easier to use than the laptop and works better in sunlight than the laptop. I don't know about other tablets but all Ipads that are capable of connecting to cellular networks have built-in GPS. A data plan is not neaded. I use a hotspot on my phone to provide WIFI for my Ipad for the AIS. If I was starting over I would just use an Ipad and add AIS to the Raymarine system on the boat.
                      Partner in a 1999 4788

                      Seattle, WA

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