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Cockpit Teak Restoring-gctid393867

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    Cockpit Teak Restoring-gctid393867

    OK, I am starting our cockpit teak. The next few days is supposed to be mid 80's.. so I went down today and blue paint taped around all the teak to prep and protect the fiberglass getting it ready for sanding tomorrow... I am taking before and after pics and will post them.................. :worth

    #2
    Use duct tape to keep from scratching when sanding - masking tape isn't thick enough unless you do 3-4 layers.

    You usually can get away with stopping at 180 grit (assume starting with 80) but if you are going to oil then I suggest going to 220/240 before finishing then wet/dry paper sanding the oil in with 400 grit.
    1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
    1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
    Nobody gets out alive.

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      #3
      kwb wrote:
      Use duct tape to keep from scratching when sanding - masking tape isn't thick enough unless you do 3-4 layers.

      You usually can get away with stopping at 180 grit (assume starting with 80) but if you are going to oil then I suggest going to 220/240 before finishing then wet/dry paper sanding the oil in with 400 grit.
      Never ever sand Teak!!!!

      Use Teak cleaner.

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        #4
        Why would you not be able to sand teak wood? Manny of us have been sanding and oiling the teak wood for many years me included

        for more than 22years so was wondering why. Arizona Bob
        Arizona Bob & Sandy
        1990 3888 Bayliner
        Purchased new
        Twin 175 Hino's
        630 Hurth Trans
        Westerbeke Generator

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          #5
          Use teak cleaner for the dark mildew stains then sand....it has worked great for me. Also, before you put your first coat on, make sure you thin it like 50% to get good penitration into the wood. From there, start adding the layers.....I stopped at 8, but the more the better. Good luck and have fun!

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            #6
            I'd be happy to never sand teak if someone wants to provide a better way to remove age old Varnish, Cetol whatever. I tried chemical stripper, heat guns, cursing, praying and then a belt sander. Only the last one worked. Wish I had tried it first. Then, no more varnish ever. Teak oil, that's the ticket.

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              #7
              Never varnish teak either...
              Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

              iBoatNW

              1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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                #8
                I survived day 1 of SANDING the teak, it has old worn varnish from someone other then us. The only way I could get this stuff off is a palm sander.. I started on the port side of the cockpit and it looks awesome so far. But I learned one lesson fast.. wear a dust mask. I seem to be umm blowing saw dust and varnish in a tissue.. It wouldnt have been to bad, but we seem to have a heatwave hitting us right now.. its mid 80's and I am dying.. The water looked really nice and cool, but I know I would have froze something fast. Tomorrow is supposed to be hotter then today.. I got from the flydeck ladder to the port side all sanded and nice, tomorrow I will tackle from the starboard side of the ladder to the starboard area around the door. I even got my Sherpa's helping me to get it done before the rains hit... phase 2 will be around Sunday I hope...

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                  #9
                  RinnyBeth wrote:
                  I survived day 1 of SANDING the teak, it has old worn varnish from someone other then us. The only way I could get this stuff off is a palm sander.. I started on the port side of the cockpit and it looks awesome so far. But I learned one lesson fast.. wear a dust mask.een to bad, but we seem to have a heatwave hitting us right no I seem to be umm blowing saw dust and varnish in a tissue.. It wouldnt have bw.. i
                  RinnyBeth,

                  When i did my refinishing a couple years ago, I used a heat gun and scraper to get 99% of the old varnish off. I then used an air driven flat board sander on the flat wood around the cockpit using 80 grit. This was followed up with 120 and finer grits until I got the desired surface finished. I used one of the Fein Multimaster oscillation sanders for the tight spots.

                  The old varnish came off pretty easy with the heat gun. Even easier than I expected. Hope this input is not too late.

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                    #10
                    Sharp scraper then lightly sand w/120.

                    Clean Teak with lacquer thinner to remove dust and surface oils. Thin first coat (as said before) and then rub with purple scotch brite pad between every coat. Do this as many time as you can until just before you go insane. It should look good by then.

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                      #11
                      R&Jonthebay wrote:
                      Sharp scraper then lightly sand w/120.

                      Clean Teak with lacquer thinner to remove dust and surface oils. Thin first coat (as said before) and then rub with purple scotch brite pad between every coat. Do this as many time as you can until just before you go insane. It should look good by then.
                      TOO LATE... with it being 91 degrees here in the harbor today, the insane part hit us. we got about a good hour into sanding before we passed out from the heatwave upon us. The insane part I know well, its a chore getting in the tight corners..

                      I wont risk a heat gun with the wood being very dry in places, I would be affraid to torch the boat... the Capt :arr would make me walk the plank for sure.. lol :worth

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                        #12
                        R&Jonthebay wrote:
                        ... and then rub with purple scotch brite pad between every coat.
                        Why the Scotch Bright?
                        Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                        iBoatNW

                        1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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                          #13
                          SomeSailor wrote:
                          Why the Scotch Bright?
                          its a sand paper.. the backing is rubbery, flexable and purple.. I have a bunch of them I use in my craft woodworking shop table

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                            #14
                            SomeSailor wrote:
                            Why the Scotch Bright?
                            They are just easy to use and don't leave sand particles behind that can get embedded in the grain of the wood. Plus....they last much longer than sand paper. They also conform to shapes (round overs and coves) a little easier. They come in four different grits, Green = very rough, purple = kinda rough, grey = not so rough and white = fine.

                            I use the ones that are about 4" x 8" and don't have any backing.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I understand what they are... I was just asking why you would sand between coats of oil? I only sweep away the dust and apply the next coat.
                              Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                              iBoatNW

                              1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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