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    32xx engine seacocks-gctid383318

    Today was "change the raw water impeller" day. The installed ones hardly have any hours on them, but according to the log book (by previous owner), they're a few years old. Cheap insurance to replace 'em and it finishes my new "baseline" for maintenance (I just bought the boat).

    Turned both seacocks off and attacked the port engine pump. Done in about 20 minutes. Too easy? Me thinks so. So moved on to the stbd engine and when I popped the cover - we had "flow". Not copious quantities, but flow none the less. Double checked the seacock and yep - it was in the off position. Moved the lever a few times - felt "normal" - but still had flow.

    Swapped the impeller anyways - the incoming water was a hindrance, but not a big deal. I called it "incentive". Had the job done in another 20 minutes and buttoned everything up. Fired both mains, verified flow - all good.

    Except the seacock.

    Anyone had one of those "quit" before?
    ________________
    1989 Bayliner 3270

    #2
    When was the last time you had the boat out of the water and looked at your intakes to the sea cocks? You might have sucked up a barnacle or something that is just enough to keep the valve from closing. If the lever feels normal, hopefully the handle hasn't corroded from the ball valve inside and severed. If your comfortable that the valve isn't broken, try working the lever a few times and maybe you can break loose anything that may be keeping the valve from closing. You said you verified flow afterwards....is it the same on both sides? Are you sure that valve is opening all the way? If it is, then again, I would try "working" it to see if you can clear out what, if anything, is keeping the valve from closing.

    Frank
    "Safe Boating is No Accident"
    Everett Sail and Power Squadron

    Comment


      #3
      Valve is definitely broken - and it's definitely closed near the 50% mark. engine runs at 2200 happily, but starts to creep up on temp when I go over 2500.

      So - anyone gotta "how to" for seacock replacements? Any preferred brand? Or is it cool to rebuild the ones I have? Also looking at re-bedding them as originals are bedded on wood "gaskets" - thinking I should switch these to 'glass" gaskets/baseplates?

      Thoughts?
      ________________
      1989 Bayliner 3270

      Comment


        #4
        Rob - go see John at Raven Marine at Mosquito. He will sell you the correct seacock if you are rebedding - and include a "starboard" disk that will replace the wood bedding that you had prior. Don't mess around with anything other than the good stuff - bronze, not brass. You will pay, but, this is the piece that keeps your inside dry.

        Perhaps you may be able to just replace the valve? I might even be comfortable doing that in the water if you are confident in threads etc.

        I've put a couple of new holes in the bottom of Braemar as you may know. Water exit for generator when we installed the separator last year, and this year the new watermaker. I went with bronze over marilon simply because I wanted to stay consistant with the rest of the boat, and the seavalve itself is "ball" style. Connect into bonding and no trouble.

        As for install, if you are putting a whole new seacock in, you will have to haul. Some heat may let the old one fall out, but I bet they put 5200 in there and that stuff is tough. Others may comment on how to get it out. But, once that's done, it really is a simple job to put the new seacock in place. Lots of 5200, two people, and you know the rest. You will need the special tool to hold the mushroom on the outside of the boat still while you tighten on the inside. I happen to know a place that carries them. Call me.

        Comment


          #5
          20 minutes is about right. Getting to them takes longer than replacing them. Regarding the thru-hull, I had an oyster prevent mine from closing. A coat hanger from outside freed it. As tidy and popular as Starboard is (Starboard is that plastic carving board material http://www.kingplastic.com/products/...ing-starboard/) it is not sticky and not the best choice for bedding thru-hulls for adherence reasons.
          1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks John - spoke to John (Raven) - he has the parts (or has them at the ready). I'll be hauling on July 6, hopefully back in the next day. Planning on pulling both thru-hulls and replacing them, along with the seacocks and re-bedding the works. I'll report back on what I find...
            ________________
            1989 Bayliner 3270

            Comment


              #7
              Pulled the boat this AM started to pull the seacocks. Wow! are they tough to get out! Took two of us, a pipe wrench and a custom made 2' pipe to get 'em moving - but eventually they came off. Thanks HUGE to Ohana 5 - there's no way I could have done this one myself...

              Tuns out my suspicion was right - and it should probably be a warning. The shaft that connects the handle to the actual (plastic) ball valve had broken. And when I looked at it, the bronze was completely red - meaning it had no secondary metals left in it, and it was basically rotten.

              My theory is electrolysis, - though interestingly enough, the seacock body itself, was fine, as was the strainer-style through hull. However one of the small drain plugs (on the seacock) was also degraded - to the point where it too broke off under a very small load. If your seacock is open and this breaks - you'll end up with water ingress.

              I can only assume that the smaller bits that make up the seacock were cast out of an inferior product. The bonding looked good, as as I said, no other signs of electrolysis damage. Kind of odd. If you have Perko seacocks from the late 80's - might want to consider taking them apart for an inspection. As I said - there was no signs of this on the exterior of the valve.

              As it sits now, the through hulls are out (I'm going to replace them as well), the plywood "gaskets" under the seacocks are out (they were wet, but structurally fine) - the old bedding cleaned up, the bilge area sanded and faired, the exterior of the hull sanded and faired, the old screw holes drilled and filled with thickened epoxy and an epoxy barrier coat applied to the hull where I took it down. Tomorrow, all going well - assembly and splash....and maybe - just maybe a night on the hook...
              ________________
              1989 Bayliner 3270

              Comment


                #8
                strum strum strum...

                Parts never showed - now get to spend two more days on the hard..

                On the good news side - boat's all waxed

                strum strum strum......
                ________________
                1989 Bayliner 3270

                Comment


                  #9
                  What do you mean parts never showed? Wow. He said he had parts. this is the stuff we are trying to never deal with as we build Yacht BC. To me if you say you are going to do something, you have to deliver. And it was one of the nicer weekends of the year..............

                  Sorry to hear that Rob. If you think I can influence, please call me to discuss.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    'parently the courier left at 4:30 Friday for a Saturday delivery. Never happened. John's doing what he can and has already helped in other way.

                    'preciate the thought John - I'll wait it out, not much else I can do. Oh - btw, replacing the whole works, including the (strainer style) through-hulls (which I found at Martin). Bottom's all prepped (sanded, barrier coated and bottom painted where it needs to be, not where it doesn't). And John let me make my own backing plates with G10 board in the shop - so those are ready to go as well - and the tube of 5200 is on the boat.

                    Just need the big expensive things now
                    ________________
                    1989 Bayliner 3270

                    Comment


                      #11
                      So tonight was re-assembly night.

                      Not.

                      I'm pretty well versed in things mechanical - so the concept of tapered pipe thread and straight pipe thread are nothing new to me. Knowing I'd need to trim the through hulls to match the combined thickness of the hull and backing plate, I bought through hulls with straight thread - and bought seacocks to match (the seacocks finally showed up). When I bought the through hulls, I looked at the threads , I asked the shop owner, he looked at the threads, we both said "straight" and the fact that they had nuts that came with them and the nuts ran top to bottom (thread length ~ 3.5" says...they're straight threads...

                      So tonight Ohana 5 and I drill holes in the bottom of the boat (ughh - I HATE that!)!), chase threads , countersink the holes and dry-fit the through hulls for fitting. On go the backer plates, screw on the seacocks and mark the gap to give me my cut length. Onto the bench, secure then, fire up the cut-off wheel, file/shape/clean the cut and away we go...

                      'cept we can't get the threads to start into the seacock now..

                      Now - I've cut a lot of threads in my time, and I'm pretty sure I know what I'm doing, but this was getting frustrating. Try, try and try, Nope. Ohana 5 tried - nope. So I cut it shorter by one thread, and try again. Nope - just won/t go. It'll start - and bind after about a 1/2 turn... wtf??

                      So then I grabbed the piece I cut off, flipped it, held it to the other piece and I'll be damned - the OD is about 1/32" bigger on the area I need it to be smaller... after a bit of head scratching, I realize that there are:

                      Tapered pipe threads

                      Straight pipe threads

                      and Straight pipe threads with a taper that are made in Taiwan... and I have to think this last design is not on purpose...

                      So, the boat sits up another day, I get to go parts shopping again, I wasted an evening of mine, but also that of a friend, I can guarantee the new parts won't have the same hole pattern as the holes I just drilled- so more epoxy and filling and I just learned a $75 lesson about pipe threads and cheap parts....
                      ________________
                      1989 Bayliner 3270

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