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    Outside Teak-gctid382618

    Ok, got a question for everyone..

    I am going to try and tackle refinishing the teak all around the cockpit and the rails.

    so here is my question..... do I tackle sanding, and doing the 3 part process.. OR do I cheat and use that new plastic looking teak and cut it to specs for our 3888??? has anyone used it before... got pics too.. They have teak looking colors to make it look normal.. just dont want it to look tacky and cheap..

    #2
    beth do it the old fashion way.i just bought a 3318 in Whittier that needs the same. the stuff you are talking about sounds like contact paper? it would be a band aid at best. keep us posted with pics.. Kevin
    1988 3270
    135 hinos
    Seldovia ALASKA
    KEVINS UPHOLSTERY
    KEVINSBOATTOPS.COM
    Marine canvas/Upholstery
    since 1975

    Comment


      #3
      I tried oil. Boo. I tried Teak Wonder. Boo. Now I'm trying Cetol Marine light with Cetol Marine gloss. Looks beautiful. I'll post some pics. I removed the steps off ladder and took them home to start and also would be my test pieces. They look awesome.
      James
      Kai Nani, Redondo Beach, CA
      1989 MY 3288
      Hino 150hp with Hurth 630A Trannies

      Comment


        #4
        alaskakev wrote:
        beth do it the old fashion way.i just bought a 3318 in Whittier that needs the same. the stuff you are talking about sounds like contact paper? it would be a band aid at best. keep us posted with pics.. Kevin
        the stuff I am talking about is the recycled stuff they use for decking now, they make it in 2x4's its a hard molded water and weather proof stuff. used to be only milk crate grey.. now there is a bunch of colors and one looks just like teak with the wood grain style in it too.. pretty cool stuff..

        HDPE I believe is the stuff

        Comment


          #5
          Beth, to find a product that would eliminate the task of constantly maintaining it would be great. I don't know how that product would look on a boat. I have seen many things, many variation from the traditional looked, sadly like something from the trailer park. What I would be concerned about is to removed all your teak and go through the time and expense of installing this man made product and then not be satisfied with the outcome.

          Unless you intend to replace all the teak with the man made product then I don't believe it would look right.

          Sorry that I cannot be more help.
          Patrick and Patti
          4588 Pilothouse 1991
          12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
          M/V "Paloma"
          MMSI # 338142921

          Comment


            #6
            IMHO, nothing can replace the look of real Teak. Unfortunately it's a constant chore to keep it looking good.

            Here's a link to my project.

            http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...kpit-refurbish

            Comment


              #7
              The problem with the teak cap is Bayliner and many others never sealed the underside that allowes moisture to migrate through the wood and lift the finish, that is the main problem with Cetol, lots of time applying and the moisture will lift it. To a good job, remove the teak clean the underside and wipe with acetone and apply 3 coats of solvent based polyurethane, install do the same with the top, then install, do not forget to seal the teak plugs.

              I have not done this with mine, but I have done the top, (the teak has taken a beating prior to my ownership), weather in Alaska is hard on the finish, my back deck and FB is fully covered with a 2x4 frame and heavy tarps, the teak stayes nice, sometimes I lightly sand the caps and apply one more coat in the spring.
              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
              Twin 350 GM power
              Located in Seward, AK
              Retired marine surveyor

              Comment


                #8
                RinnyBeth wrote:
                Ok, got a question for everyone..

                I am going to try and tackle refinishing the teak all around the cockpit and the rails.

                so here is my question..... do I tackle sanding, and doing the 3 part process.. OR do I cheat and use that new plastic looking teak and cut it to specs for our 3888??? has anyone used it before... got pics too.. They have teak looking colors to make it look normal.. just dont want it to look tacky and cheap..
                I just finished my teak (again).. I had to take the back rail and fly bridge steps down to bare wood.. i used 10 coats of Petit Captains varnish and 2 coats of Cetol clear coat; it looks great and always worth the effort when finished ..

                Last season I saw a 38 in my Marina a few times that had the milk crate color over the entire cockpit. I saw it from a distance so can't comment on the quality of it but in my opinion it just didn't look right..

                I am on a schedule to put a few quotes on every six months every April and October.. This way I will not have to take the wood down again. And adding a few quotes is only a three day job twice a year as apposed to a three week job once a year.

                Varnishing is tedious work but the end result is always beautiful and satisfying.

                Comment


                  #9
                  My trawler has teak decks and if you get the hang of it, oiling is very easy sortof brainless work. make sure you use real tung oil and not the synthetics. I've applied 2 coats on all decks now, and will continue the Bristol finishing of the bright work (cap rails, window frames, trim and ornamental bits).

                  Nothing beats the look of well-maintained teak (in my opinion).
                  Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                  iBoatNW

                  1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

                  Comment


                    #10
                    SomeSailor wrote:
                    My trawler has teak decks and if you get the hang of it, oiling is very easy sortof brainless work. make sure you use real tung oil and not the synthetics. I've applied 2 coats on all decks now, and will continue the Bristol finishing of the bright work (cap rails, window frames, trim and ornamental bits).

                    Nothing beats the look of well-maintained teak (in my opinion).
                    I'm with mike on this.

                    Oil based finishes never peel or chip. They're easy and quick to apply with a rag.

                    The only downside is you have to apply oil frequently.

                    KEVIN SANDERS
                    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                    www.transferswitch4less.com

                    where are we right now?

                    https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                    Comment


                      #11
                      SomeSailor wrote:
                      My trawler has teak decks and if you get the hang of it, oiling is very easy sortof brainless work. make sure you use real tung oil and not the synthetics. I've applied 2 coats on all decks now, and will continue the Bristol finishing of the bright work (cap rails, window frames, trim and ornamental bits).Nothing beats the look of well-maintained teak (in my opinion).
                      The Tung oil is really good stuff.. I finished my inside wood with Tung oil and It looks fantastic. It darkens the lighter wood slightly but brings back the cherry wood nicely...Tung oil is a bit tricky at first and you must watch it and wipe up the seepage right away or it can make a mess. I attached a few pics..

                      http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]

                      http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]

                      http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]

                      http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]

                      http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Yep... here's what an old salt told me about an teak oiling schedule:

                        Once a day for a week. Once a week for a month. Once a month for a year. Once a year forever.

                        It seeps into and hardens IN the wood. It's good stuff. Not cheap, but good stuff.
                        Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                        iBoatNW

                        1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

                        Comment


                          #13
                          boatworkfl wrote:
                          The problem with the teak cap is Bayliner and many others never sealed the undersideyhat allowes moisture to migrate through the wood and lift the finish, that is the main problem with Cetol, lots of time applying and the moisture will lift it.
                          This has not been my experience with Cetol, and I actually question your premise that the moisture is migrating all the way through the wood. Do you mean on the edge adjacent to an unfinished bottom? And if that is the problem, what finish can withstand that?

                          Cetol has lasted perfectly on my boat, and is amazingly easy to reapply. Wash, dry, scuff, and slap on another coat. It seems a much better protectant than oil in general. If you're religious about it like Somesailor, I'm sure the right oil is great too. This is the previous owner performing the work 3 years ago and the wood looks the same today. He did not remove the teak to seal the bottom if it is unsealed.

                          http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...ish-(complete)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            toukow wrote:
                            This has not been my experience with Cetol, and I actually question your premise that the moisture is migrating all the way through the wood. Do you mean on the edge adjacent to an unfinished bottom? And if that is the problem, what finish can withstand that?

                            Cetol has lasted perfectly on my boat, and is amazingly easy to reapply. Wash, dry, scuff, and slap on another coat. It seems a much better protectant than oil in general. If you're religious about it like Somesailor, I'm sure the right oil is great too. This is the previous owner performing the work 3 years ago and the wood looks the same today. He did not remove the teak to seal the bottom if it is unsealed.

                            http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...ish-(complete)
                            very nice pics.. I think I will do it your way.. seems easier and less time consuming.. we have a cover ove the cockpit, so it will be easier if I start in less then stellar weather.. lord knows we have plenty of blue painters tape left from the dry dock painting the under hull..

                            Comment


                              #15
                              toukow wrote:
                              This has not been my experience with Cetol, and I actually question your premise that the moisture is migrating all the way through the wood. Do you mean on the edge adjacent to an unfinished bottom? And if that is the problem, what finish can withstand that?

                              Cetol has lasted perfectly on my boat, and is amazingly easy to reapply. Wash, dry, scuff, and slap on another coat. It seems a much better protectant than oil in general. If you're religious about it like Somesailor, I'm sure the right oil is great too. This is the previous owner performing the work 3 years ago and the wood looks the same today. He did not remove the teak to seal the bottom if it is unsealed.

                              http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...ish-(complete)
                              I use solvent based polyurethane, I do the edges and then caulk the edges so moisture does not lift the finish, in Seward AK Cetol just does not work well, once moisture gets under it all needs to come off. I used teak oil for years, I got tired of the weather eating it off.

                              To each his own, what works for one may not work for another depending on weather conditions.
                              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                              Twin 350 GM power
                              Located in Seward, AK
                              Retired marine surveyor

                              Comment

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