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Are 110(39)s Enough?-gctid380208

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    Are 110(39)s Enough?-gctid380208

    My wife and I are looking for our first motor yacht. We live in SE AK and have been looking for a 32XX. I've located a couple of prospects and we're beginning to physically look at boats. Some of the earlier boats I have found have the 110's. Without getting into a gas / diesel debate, are the 110's enough? Most of our outings will be in the immediate area with occassional trips into Juneau, about 50 miles away, and maybe some extended trips every once in awhile. So, while we're not looking at being in a hurry or needing to get anywhere quickly, I don't won't a boat that feels underpowered. For those of you with the 110's, are they adequate or are they lacking? We realize performance will depend on the configuration and loading of the boat and are looking for general comments. We will have a thorough pre-buy inspection / mechanical survey before purchasing. Any thoughts or guidance would be appreciated.
    Kelly & Mindy
    85 3270
    GetAway
    Petersburg, AK

    #2
    110 hp is on the light side but if you are like most 32 owners you will cruise 8-11 knots and 110 will push you fine in that range.
    1989 26' then 1994 32' now 2001 39'

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      #3
      nice engines, naturally aspirated no turbos to worry about ..

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        #4
        Roscoe, do you have specifics on the engines? I'm just trying to be sure they are the Hino WO4D engines, not Chrysler/Mitsubishi? The naturally aspirated 110HP Hinos are lovely engines. The Mits have less HP and can be problematic. Regardless, with 220HP the boat will not be a speedster. If speed is important to you, you should consider looking only at 32xx's with force-fed Hinos, or gas.

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          #5
          Have you ever heared someone say "I wish I had bought the one with less horse power"?

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            #6
            I appreciate the comments so far. The engines are Hinos. We're going to look at the boat this morning and go for a short ride. If things look ok we'll order the survey.
            Kelly & Mindy
            85 3270
            GetAway
            Petersburg, AK

            Comment


              #7
              Roscoe wrote:
              My wife and I are looking for our first motor yacht. We live in SE AK and have been looking for a 32XX. I've located a couple of prospects and we're beginning to physically look at boats. Some of the earlier boats I have found have the 110's. Without getting into a gas / diesel debate, are the 110's enough? Most of our outings will be in the immediate area with occassional trips into Juneau, about 50 miles away, and maybe some extended trips every once in awhile. So, while we're not looking at being in a hurry or needing to get anywhere quickly, I don't won't a boat that feels underpowered. For those of you with the 110's, are they adequate or are they lacking? We realize performance will depend on the configuration and loading of the boat and are looking for general comments. We will have a thorough pre-buy inspection / mechanical survey before purchasing. Any thoughts or guidance would be appreciated.
              I looked at about 18 of these boats before buying. If I had known then what I know now, I think I would have approached it a little differently. Your question shows you understand the different factors affecting speed, etc. My points will wander a little from the 110's a bit given the choices available.

              I was waiting for someone to chime in with the top speed of the 110's. A quick google search found this from this forum:

              we have a 1986 3270 with 110 Hinos:

              Props are 17x15

              top speed about 14 kts @ 3000rpm @ 10 gph

              fast cruise is 11 kts @ 2600rpm @ 7 gph

              slow cruise is 8 kts @ 2150rpm @ 4 gph

              And this from the 32xx website, which is worth a visit if you haven't yet. The 'much less' comment is with respect to gas engines:

              http://www.bayliner32xx.com/DesktopD...dex=1&tabid=19

              The 110 hinos seem to cruise around 10-12 kts. with much better fuel economy (around 2 nmpg) but top speed is much less (14 kts?).

              Accurate?- you'll have to research.

              When I bought I wasn't sure how we'd really use it as we'd never owned a boat this big, and hadn't been an owner for many years. I have 17x17 props, and am over-propped and seems like the maximum speed we get is 15 knots or a so (the above link states 18 knots for 135's). So perhaps my boat is slow compared to other 135's, but if 14 is a realistic number for a 110, not worth worrying about in my mind. I had thought I'd like to have the extra top speed in my back pocket for emergencies, etc.

              As others have said, we also tend to cruise much slower than I anticipated. This usually becomes the case with a simple visit to the fuel dock after running at high RPM's for a significant amount of time.

              In hindsight, I wish I have bought the 150's; not because of the power, but the Hurth 630 transmissions are much more robust than the 360's. The 360's are supposedly starting to have parts issues if you have significant damage to major components. While debatable on the forum, the knowledgeable owner of Banana Belt said the 135 with the 360 Hurth was a bit quicker than the 150 with 630 Hurths, due to the increased parasitic losses of the 630's. The good thing is you can always retrofit the 360's with the 630's, but then the extra HP would be nice to have over the 110's.

              So I'm not sure having the extra complexity/cost of the 135's are worth it, and if I didn't care about the difference in transmissions or found a good price, would now consider the 110's. That said, I would have to find a good priced boat given I think resale is impacted a little based on your question. We're Americans, more is always better especially in HP. My boat has 1500 hours and has had both turbos replaced by the P.O. at something like $1200 each just for parts. Also, the 110's have larger displacement than the 135/150. The less you you place on these engines, the less chance of issues with the manicoolers as well (this per North Harbor Diesel), and that makes sense.

              For what it's worth. Good hunting, Dean

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                #8
                I have 110's. Reading about turbo troubles on here headed me down the 110 n/a path. I have no regrets, but also now realize most turbo issues are user brought on,ie not shut down properly.

                One key point in my mind that hasn't been touched on here is how you will load your boat, a hardtop, dighy on platform, generator or large bank of batteries for a converter, not to mention what the admiral wants to bring aboard can drive you to need more power. Even weather affects mine, a cool day and I can run 3000 rpm all day, warm July and August heat and I lose up to 300 - 350 rpm. I like my 110's and wouldn't pass them up if I did it again.

                Jim

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                  #9
                  Ive had my 85 3270 w/110hp for four years now. Very nice. Being new to diesels, I can confirm that these motors are real work horses as with diesels are in general compared to gas.

                  We cruise 10-11 MPH on long trips.

                  Each year we take a 6 hour trip up the lakeshore of Lake Michigan to a favorite vacation spot. Round trip fuel cost is $300-$350.00. Friends of ours with a 32' gas Trojan pay out $1000-$1200 in fuel.

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                    #10
                    I have twin Yanmars 170hp in my 3288. Top speed is 23knots. Maybe I could get 24knots if the props were cupped. Cruising speed up to about 17knots. Normally when traveling longer I cruise 14-15knots and when not in a hurry and good weather 7-8knots and a beer in my hand on the bridge. The later is why we can keep up with the weather in Sweden during the autumn/winter/spring! :go-

                    As Jim says the boat will be different depending on loads and extras. Mine has no hardtop. No genset. I also throwed out the AC. Moved the batteries(6) to between the engines as long forward as possible. Made fueltanks shorter. I┬┤m sure this makes difference.

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                      #11
                      I appreciate everyone's responses. We went into Juneau over the weekend and looked at a very clean boat with the 110's. Weather was pretty gnarly, but we went out for about 45 minutes with the owner and broker. Long story short, we were happy with the boat and how it ran so we made an offer and ordered the survey. We should know more in a day or two. Our previous boat was a 21' in-board jet, 330 hp, that we used to run the rivers of south-central Alaska so we're looking forward to switching gears and experiencing south-east AK. I'm sure we'll have questions as we go. If the purchase goes through I'll be sure to post an update.

                      Thanks again
                      Kelly & Mindy
                      85 3270
                      GetAway
                      Petersburg, AK

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                        #12
                        yachtman32 wrote:
                        Reading about turbo troubles on here headed me down the 110 n/a path. I have no regrets, but also now realize most turbo issues are user brought on,ie not shut down properly.
                        I have 135's with no turbo problems in over 3K hours my biggest Issue is the transmissions I wouldnt buy on with 360's if I had it to do over. My advice is newer is better 1990 or newer

                        Bill

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