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Water tanks in a 4550-gctid379429

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    Water tanks in a 4550-gctid379429

    Don't mean to beat this to death, I have read posts about not being able to use all available water from both tanks without turning 1 tank valve off, have been experimenting with this and find that my water pump struggles to bring water pressure when the aft tank is turned off.

    I have installed a new Jabsco 5.0 gpm automatic pump, bypassed the accumulator as they recommended, I talked with them!

    When I fill my water tanks, I open both fill points, and slowly add water. When full, both openings overflow, as well as the vent.

    I have normally left both water tank valves open, pump pulls water just fine. Turn off the aft tank, top valve on mine, is labelled on handle, pump will work normal for day or two, but starts to work more than normal to bring water. When using forward shower,pressure will decrease to the point you have to turn water off,let pressure build and then open again. Doesn't do this with valves both on.

    I have a filter before water pump and thinking of bypassing to see if it is the problem. Otherwise, I'm thinking possible restriction in feed line from forward tank, which would be a pain to replace!

    Any thoughts from you knowledgeable folks?

    #2
    Have a 4588, so similar layout.

    1) Only 1 Tank should be open at a time. The tanks are different sizes and my guess is you are sucking one dry and getting a mix or air and water. The accumulator tank helps reduce pulsation, I personally like ours. Try filling both tanks, run on one and then the see you have an issue. I assume you will not, then close off that one and open the other....you may have a little air to blead out, that is normal for us and then I think you will run fine.

    If not, you have 3 areas to check:

    1) strainer (Mess filter before pump)

    2) Take hose off from each tank and see if you get good flow, we had some mineral build clog that opening years back

    3) Check your put head by taking it a part and confirm the values or impeller are all in good shape (no set in curves, cups, or bends...if so get a rebuild kit.)
    Mark
    USCG OUPV
    1990 4588
    Carlsbad, CA

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      #3
      I tell you what, our 4550 is our 4th "big" boat and I have all but decided that the water tank and associated shut off valves essentially defy logic and basic physics. They still make no sense to me. What I have personally landed on that seems to be yielding the best results (as measured by longest lasting tanks!) is A) closing both valves in the engine room to both tanks, B) Opening both fill caps on the deck, C) Filling both tanks til they overflow.

      Frankly, despite having read every single thread here on BOC about the 45 water tanks, it still makes no sense to me why the valves need to be shut. In all previous boats that had a manifold tank system, one only needed to to fill in one location on the deck and the manifold between the 2 tanks equalized the pressure. Our tanks are aluminum so it is not like pressure is going to blow a seam. Why not one fill pipe, tanks connected in a simple manifold so that once lower tank fills it spills over to the upper tank, and one feed line from low point of lowest tank to the freshwater pump, hot water heater, etc. To me THAT would be the logical way to do it. Instead, I feel like I have to do a bit of witch magic to get full tanks and get them running right.

      maybe someone can explain to me why the simple water tank system I explained was not possible on the 45?? :arr
      ~~1987 Bayliner 4550 Pilothouse & 17' Boston Whaler Dauntless~~

      Comment


        #4
        Two comments on that:

        There are two sides to a water system. Fill and Draw(drain). The idea on multiple tanks is to keep the systems seperate for reduance and contamination issue as well as the for weight and balance of th boat. In our boats having the low long tank filled we ride much nicer. We have a water maker and it only files one of the two tanks by our design incase it malfunitions we have backup supple of dockside water that we know is safe (so two tanks, two fills good for us).

        On the Draw side of the tanks it helps again for them to be isolated for containation issues.
        Mark
        USCG OUPV
        1990 4588
        Carlsbad, CA

        Comment


          #5
          Woodsong, I'm with you!

          Not my first big boat either, makes no logical sense.

          I removed water filter, a single element racor, that was mounted above my water pump. Made a world of difference, great water pressure, able to draw from either tank now, we'll see how long it takes to empty and what quantity I can put back in. Pump was having problems drawing thru water filter. When I bought boat it had no element in filter, wanting to do right thing I installed racor filter, but pump had problems drawing thru it I guess.

          Having problems with this new Jabsco 5.0 pump, keeps shutting off, have to recycle switch. Talked with Jabsco, they are sending replacement, so will try that.

          I will try filling tanks with valves closed, see if it does anything different. I have been filling with valves open and both ports open, fill to they both overflow.

          Thanks for the replies fellas!

          Comment


            #6
            In replacing my tanks I used a valved 1" connection between the two tanks, allowing the upper to flow to lower fast enough to accept full fill hose pressure. Valved for emergency shut off isolation only. Also added a 3/4" vent hose to prevent the tanks from being over pressured in an unattended fill. Water maker supplies system upstream of water pump and filter, back filling the tanks until upper tank full limit switch hit. Each tank is also gaged.

            On multiple short trips only one tank was being used, leaving the second to "sour". Not being one who enjoys managing every piece of the boat every day, I could find no good reason to isolate the two under normal conditions nor would I ever want to draw off the lower tank first, keeping the ballast low. Two tanks connected directly makes one larger tank. My bet is the only reason Bayliner used two was that it was easier to install than one.

            This system has worked very well for 3+ years now and I never have to deal with switching from one tank to another to insure use, or that it won't need to be switched mid shower! The key components are high volume fittings for the tank connection and venting (one from each tank).

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