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Stripping Varnish from Teak-gctid664251

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    Stripping Varnish from Teak-gctid664251

    So we are getting ready to strip all the exterior teak on the boat and prep it for new varnish. I have always use Jabsco Paint Stripper and plastic scrapers. But it has been some time since I have done any. Was wondering if anyone has any tricks or new products and methods that they would care to share. I don't like heat as the Cetol on the teak now is thick and I am concerned about burning the wood so that is out.

    Will be happy to post the project as to goes if anyone is interested.
    Patrick and Patti
    4588 Pilothouse 1991
    12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
    M/V "Paloma"
    MMSI # 338142921

    #2
    I too would like to see any tricks. I still need to do my Alaska bulkhead. I did the rails with the heat gun, then belt sanded it down to fresh new wood. I think the heat gun might work better since you have it on thick.
    Esteban
    Panama City, Panama
    Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952
    Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida

    Comment


      #3
      I don't think there is any magic. Chemicals, heat, abrasion.

      Comment


        #4
        oh, there may be some magic ! Have you tried and oscillating tool with a scraper ? finding the right scraper is the hard part. there are also a variety of other attachments like plunge cutters and stuff, very cool tool to have in the box.
        1990 3888 Bayliner, Twin 351's

        Comment


          #5
          I use a variety of different size hand scrapers and an oscillating sander with 120 grit paper. Some of those sponge sanders come in handy for hard to get to spots. One of the tricks to using a scraper is to keep it sharp. It will cut better and with more control. A dull scraper requires you to put to much pressure on it to cut. That's when your more likely to dig to deep into the wood. I also knock the square corners of the blade off so it is slightly rounded. That will also help from digging in and leaving shoulders. It takes a little practice but in the long run I think it's faster and without the toxic mess that chemical strippers create.

          Good luck

          Comment


            #6
            Patrick, as you know we just completed the entire exterior (bow to stern) refinish on our 45. Get a 5" variable speed orbital sander start with 80 grit to take down the old then simply move up in grit as needed to 220 you can also go to 320. The Dremel sanding disc was priceless in doing the detailed sanding. I had a new Dremel that died near the end of the job (my orbital also kicked the bucket) if you do not have one pop up to Harbor Freight and buy their $35 multi-tool also a dremel type orbital with sanding drum comes in handy also (again Harbor Freight up on Evergreen)

            I did not use any paint strippers we did all sanding. The Cockpit rail and walls is a 2 day rough sand to bare then another day of finish sanding. It is a crappy job personally I think that is the fastest way (better yet is is also a good job for one of the dock teenagers you may know, pretty hard for them to screw up the rough in sanding when supervised). It also helps to buy a orbital that you can hook up to your Wet/Dry/vac this will really keep the dust down. If you have a lot of buildup you could start with 60-grit also.

            Remember to tape the windows before sanding otherwise at some point you will scratch them with the sand paper. Or better yet remove the wood strips that hold down the glass and sand the edge near the glass while removed this is the cleanest way, it is also a good time to re-bed the glass. Your boat is kept under cover so you likely do not know if that bulkhead leaks, when I bought my 45 and the rain blew in I had leaks in that bulkhead where the glass was. So this is a good time for a little preventative maintenance even though you are under cover and have cockpit canvass.

            Also if you are going back to Cetol you will need two quarts of each. Also when I did mine in late April there was a shortage of Cetol in the NW I bought the last quart of clear in All of the Seattle Area (Sikkens was Back ordered to all NW retailers). I finally found it at a West Marine in Seattle (all the other West Marines were also out from Everett to Tacoma), they were more expensive then Fisheries however they did price match. Lesson here is do not wait till you need it as it might not be available locally. (That was Lat April it may be different now however demand is certainly higher now).

            Also buy the bulk packs of painters tape you will use a lot of it...

            I avoided using scrapers once you gouge the wood there is no way to repair other than sanding it down further, power tools all the way till the last finish sand...

            geterdone



            PS.

            If you are refinishing your bow pulpit since you likely need to remove the windlass and hardware there would only be 3 bolts left to remove it completely. I have the one I removed from my boat that is is good condition and only needs refinishing, it is yours free if you want (with Hardware), that way you could refinish it (top and bottom) and then just swap them out..


            Comment


              #7
              And if you sand, wear some sort of mask. I didn't and after days of sanding I did have weird stuff in my nose/lungs.

              Apparently there is nasty bacteria or something in teak.
              Esteban
              Panama City, Panama
              Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952
              Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks guys. I am going to try using a chemical stripper, Circa 1850 Heavy Body Paint & Varnish Remover. Jamestown Distributors highly recommends it. I may end up using sand paper but would like to avoid it as much as possible.

                Thanks too for the reminder about teak dust. I had forgotten about that.

                Once everything is stripped, we are going to use a stain to make the wood around the salon windows match the rest of the teak. Then two coats of reduced epoxy resin, sanding between each coat, followed by three coats of varnish. I haven't decided yet what varnish I am going to use. I understand that Cetol now has a clear varnish instead of the traditional yellow version.

                I will let you all know how this goes.
                Patrick and Patti
                4588 Pilothouse 1991
                12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
                M/V "Paloma"
                MMSI # 338142921

                Comment


                  #9
                  I went with Cetol as it is easy to maintain you can simply add coats year after year to achieve that new look, whereas Varnish not so much. Cetol also allows you to do repairs with easy matching and spotting whereas Varnish is a complete do-over especially if you get any cracking and discoloration in the wood. Also in this weather you can do 2 coats of Cetolin one long day and requires no sanding between coats however I would lightly sand before the last coat. If you do use Cetol it helps to thin it a bit. IMO the Clear Cetol is very clear and has a great UV protection.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I'm going to give a big recommendation here for Epiphanes varnish. I use the "Woodfinish Gloss" in this link:

                    https://www.epifanes.com/page/wood-finish-gloss

                    I used this on my Monk 36 that I owned prior to our 45 and I have used it on my 45. When I bought our 45 the PO had used cetol. It had flaked up all over the place and looked terrible. I used a heat gun and a scraper to remove it and it came off in sheets very easily. Once I did that, we sanded everything down and started with clean fresh wood. I put about 10 coats of epiphanes on our teak. I personally prefer true varnish over cetol and if applied correctly, it creates a long lasting finish that only takes occasional top coats to keep looking excellent. Nothing wrong per se with cetol but true varnish looks great when you are done in my opinion.
                    ~~1987 Bayliner 4550 Pilothouse & 17' Boston Whaler Dauntless~~

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I also like the prefer look of varnish however that is a lot of work and down time as it requires so many coast and longer dry times between coats. It will also mean you will need to re-tape quite a few times in due to the summer heat. I wold imagine 10 coats would take a month to apply and with the cockpit as a work zone and all hardware removed it is difficult to use the boat especially with fresh soft varnish, That was the main reason I went with Cetol. I originally had varnish that I stripped it was in pretty good shape however there were a couple sports that water had penetrated and greyed a few spots mostly neat seams, Had that been Cetol I could spot sand and re apply however with Varnish no way. When I discussed my options with Fisheries marine Paint Dept they also confirmed these issues and said that with the newer stains and clear and that Cetol was overwhelmingly the #1 seller/choice.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I would OIL never varnish ....if an area looks a little worn...rub it down with oil. And Cetol..I will remain silent...
                        Vic Stewart SN
                        Past Commander
                        Cape Fear Power Squadron
                        Ft Myers Power Squadron
                        1998 2859 7.4 L/B2
                        Raw water cooled

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Lightsout is right, you can even go a little courser to start. Also if you just oil the wood after stripping, you never have to strip again a little teak oil every six months will leave it looking great! Not shiny but will show the beauty of the wood!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            "GearGuts" post=664264 wrote:
                            oh, there may be some magic ! Have you tried and oscillating tool with a scraper ? finding the right scraper is the hard part. there are also a variety of other attachments like plunge cutters and stuff, very cool tool to have in the box.
                            That's abrasion, not a miracle. :unsure:

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Hi Charlie, have you ever tried using an ofia blade to strip the varnish off ? This is as close to magic as it gets on your smaller trim with varnish on them. Try this out on a piece about 2"-3" wide. Holding the blade at slightly less than a 90 degree to the surface so the edge of the blade is dragging and not cutting in. Pull the blade towards you on the surface using both hands holding the ends of the blade and use it like a paint scraper. You will have to play with the pressure you use, angle to the surface and flex in the blade but it won't take you long to find the sweet spot. Work one side of the trim to the other, and not the whole piece at a time. This does not work well on pieces wider than the blade but will clean up the edges and sides real nice, actually, really, really nice, like magic but not a miracle Lol. You will still need to sand or strip but this will get 95% of the old material off in a fraction of the time.

                              I better put a disclaimer in to use proper protection as the blade is used by itself and not with a holder. In case you did not see the flooring post, one of our members almost lost his finger. Also, if you don't wear glasses, use some sort of eye protection, even sunglasses would work. Don't buy the cheep blades, they will be dull by the 10th pass.

                              As for what should be applied for final coats, each climate will be different. In my area, only marine cetol is used. If I were you, I'd walk around your marina, see what woodwork you like on other boats and see what they used.

                              Terry

                              Edit; better yet is a cabinet scraper, Google it and watch a video of how to use one. They cost about $20 for a set of 4. Only thing about them is they require sharpening often. But four will get you a long way. Your most likely not going to find them in a big box store (they won't know what your talking about) but a woodworking supply store will have them.

                              .
                              1982 3270
                              Volvo BB 140 A's
                              Killbear Marina, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada

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