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    Blisters-gctid344116

    My 91 3288 had the hull sandblasted and epoxy coated shortly after it was bought new. For some reason the hull developed blisters and bayliner paid for the fix.

    I did not know this when I bought the boat. When I last took the boat out of the water there were a few blisters...not too many.

    Does anyone know if the epoxy coat has to be redone after 20+ years. Also any ideas on why this boat blistered so quickly in the first place?

    The boat is original from Stockton Ca.

    Thanks,

    Jon

    #2
    I have done a lot of research and reading on blisters and have concluded the following:

    Blisters occur as random acts based on a hex provided via Witch of the deep.

    No amount of preparations or coatings will eliminate them.

    Blisters will not damage your hull except in eye of potential buyer in 99.99 percent of hulls.

    Many boaters have been sold a bill of meaningless goods when they had extensive work done to their hulls to clean off blisters and gel coat, dry the hulls, coat their hulls, and repaint their hulls.

    An extremely small percentage of blisters actually harm the integrity of hulls.

    Blisters can occur on any hull at any time.

    A small number of smaller blisters can be made to disappear by mild grinding, filling and new bottom paint.

    If you have really pissed off the Witch of the deep blisters will occur on areas above the waterline and on decks. if you do not believe this talk to some Uniflight owners.

    Blisters can occur on all fiberglass surfaces including my motorhome which has never been in fresh or saltwater.
    Started boating 1965
    Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

    Comment


      #3
      bayliner3288 wrote:
      My 91 3288 had the hull sandblasted and epoxy coated shortly after it was bought new. For some reason the hull developed blisters and bayliner paid for the fix.

      I did not know this when I bought the boat. When I last took the boat out of the water there were a few blisters...not too many.

      Does anyone know if the epoxy coat has to be redone after 20+ years. Also any ideas on why this boat blistered so quickly in the first place?

      The boat is original from Stockton Ca.

      Thanks,

      Jon
      In general blisters are nothing to worry about, they are essentially cosmetic on the surface of the hull. Yes, on very rare occasions they can lead to delamination issues but this is extremely rare. My dad had his boat (Tollycraft) "peeled" twice to the tune of 15k and 25k each, guess what happened, they came back... As cooler heads have prevailed and people are more educated as to the cause of blisters the most common practice is to grind and fill each of the blisters as they arise. I see that you are in CA and likely do some if not most of your boating on the Delta? Warmer water tends to increase the likelihood of getting blisters so this may be your case. To answer your question regarding if the epoxy coat has to be redone after 20 years, see my previous note about peeling and spending big $$ on "repairing". If I were you I would grind and fill as the blisters come and get out and enjoy your boat.

      Comment


        #4
        I found a very quick and cheap way to repair blisters.

        I had maybe 100 of them on a 1985 2850 I bought in 2000. I took a hammer and screw driver and hit each one and the gel coat over the blister just pinged off.

        I filled with regular fiberglass resin. Put it on with a plastic body plastic applicator. Took 2 or 3 coats to fill completely. Sanded them smooth with a body shop air DA and painted with 1980 GM auto white which is a perfect match for the gel coat on that boat. I used lacquer which isn't available any longer.

        I used that as I didn't want to paint the hull which never had bottom paint and I just spotted in the repair area.

        I sold that boat last year. Not one of the blisters re appeared and you could not see where any had been repaired. Again I never had bottom paint on that boat.

        If you were going to bottom paint, just fill them, apply a barrier coat and paint.

        Be sure they are bone dry before you try to repair. Bone dry.
        Started boating 1955
        Number of boats owned 32
        Bayliners
        2655
        2755
        2850
        3870 presently owned
        Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

        Comment


          #5
          The trick to doing a good blister repair is to peal the gelcoat and at least the first layer of mat, from there you need to look for those deep pin holes and grind them out, then dry the hull out, if you do not dry the hull the blisters may re-appear.

          I pealed a 37' Tolly that had been spot repaired several times, spot repairs did not solve the problem. After pealing the boat was sheltered, then washed with soap and water and rinsed, then the shelter was heated, then left in the shelter for the winter in Seward, AK, in the spring I heated the shelter again and used a moisture meter to be sure the hull was dry, from there the hull was rolled with vinyl ester resin and a layer of matt applies, 2-3 more coats of vinylester, then a primer, then 2+ coats of interlux ultra, in 6+ years there has not been any blisters, the bottom paint lasted 5 years and another year+ with a touch up on the sides. The boat gained 1 1/2" knots with the loss of all that water, that hull nearly maxed out my moisture meter.

          It is possible that those other blister jobs they did not dry the hull long enough.

          Now for your repair, get a 4 1/2" grinder with a 80 grit sanding disc and grind out the blisters intill you do not see any pin holes, be carefull, those blisters can be under as much as 200 psi, if repaired with epoxy then use epoxy to repair, otherwise use vinyl ester, 3m makes a vinyl ester patch material, use it, vinyl ester will not let moisture through, most boat manfg. use at least a layer or 2 as a moisture barrier under the gel coat. Moisture can also migrate from the inside into the laminate.

          What happens to cause a blister is moisture will migrate through the gelcoat, then the water acts as a solvent in the poylester laminate and a glycol type liquid forms, this liquid cannot get back out through the gelcoat and a blister forms.

          Hope this helps. Pat S.
          Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

          Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
          Twin 350 GM power
          Located in Seward, AK
          Retired marine surveyor

          Comment


            #6
            boatworkfl wrote:
            The trick to doing a good blister repair is to peal the gelcoat and at least the first layer of mat, from there you need to look for those deep pin holes and grind them out, then dry the hull out, if you do not dry the hull the blisters may re-appear.

            I pealed a 37' Tolly that had been spot repaired several times, spot repairs did not solve the problem. After pealing the boat was sheltered, then washed with soap and water and rinsed, then the shelter was heated, then left in the shelter for the winter in Seward, AK, in the spring I heated the shelter again and used a moisture meter to be sure the hull was dry, from there the hull was rolled with vinyl ester resin and a layer of matt applies, 2-3 more coats of vinylester, then a primer, then 2+ coats of interlux ultra, in 6+ years there has not been any blisters, the bottom paint lasted 5 years and another year+ with a touch up on the sides. The boat gained 1 1/2" knots with the loss of all that water, that hull nearly maxed out my moisture meter.

            It is possible that those other blister jobs they did not dry the hull long enough.

            Now for your repair, get a 4 1/2" grinder with a 80 grit sanding disc and grind out the blisters intill you do not see any pin holes, be carefull, those blisters can be under as much as 200 psi, if repaired with epoxy then use epoxy to repair, otherwise use vinyl ester, 3m makes a vinyl ester patch material, use it, vinyl ester will not let moisture through, most boat manfg. use at least a layer or 2 as a moisture barrier under the gel coat. Moisture can also migrate from the inside into the laminate.

            What happens to cause a blister is moisture will migrate through the gelcoat, then the water acts as a solvent in the poylester laminate and a glycol type liquid forms, this liquid cannot get back out through the gelcoat and a blister forms.

            Hope this helps. Pat S.
            Looks like a lot of work, maybe too much Kool-aid. Several years ago I discovered about 200 blisters on our 47 mostly just below the water line, a couple months after we moved the boat from fresh to salt water. Before that had none since boat was new. We popped the blisters, ground them slightly to remove the irregular edges and removed bottom paint at the edges, applied fiberglass patch material with the little beads in it, ground the repairs smooth, and painted bottom paint over them, oh yes, we let the holes dry while we had lunch. None have reappeared. Pretty simple and a whole lot cheaper and quicker than the "school" solution to repairing blisters.
            Started boating 1965
            Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

            Comment


              #7
              mmichellich wrote:
              Looks like a lot of work, maybe too much Kool-aid. Several years ago I discovered about 200 blisters on our 47 mostly just below the water line, a couple months after we moved the boat from fresh to salt water. Before that had none since boat was new. We popped the blisters, ground them slightly to remove the irregular edges and removed bottom paint at the edges, applied fiberglass patch material with the little beads in it, ground the repairs smooth, and painted bottom paint over them, oh yes, we let the holes dry while we had lunch. None have reappeared. Pretty simple and a whole lot cheaper and quicker than the "school" solution to repairing blisters.
              It appears that your blisters were not deep, and when you ground them you got-it-all, this is the method I would try first as a self to do project. It seems that salt water has more blister issues than fresh, I will look into the difference sometime. Good going!
              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
              Twin 350 GM power
              Located in Seward, AK
              Retired marine surveyor

              Comment


                #8
                I didn't do anything, just left them alone..when on the hard in a few days I don't think ya could even tell there were blisters, but when ya first pulled the boat ya could sure see them.. About thumb nail size and like Michael's I would guess a good couple hundred.

                It sure freaked my out when I first saw that it had blaisters on the hull, but after listening to others here and yard owners the common message was "possible resale issues" nothing more.

                Fortunately that was not the case when we sold her.

                Comment

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