Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Washington-gctid371387

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Washington-gctid371387

    We bought our 4788 two and a half years ago and have been keeping her in Channel Islands near Ventura, Ca. since. Our kids have all moved to the PNW and the first grandchild came recently. None of ours will be coming home to this state. We will be relocating and would like some input. Last week we explored Seattle, La Conner, Kirkland, Gig Harbor and Bellevue. There wasn't enough time.

    There are two areas of input Kelly and I are looking for.

    Should we ship her via Ensenada and BC or bring her up ourselves? Looking for your experience there on the pros and cons, weather, tides, costs etc. We know that this is a broad subject.

    Likewise, where are good places to put her when we get there and where would you absolutely not go.

    Our "Lucky Liner" has no stabilizers or thrusters.

    Looking for another adventure,

    Joe and Kelly

    2002 4788

    "Lucky Liner"
    Joe
    2001 5288
    Lucky Liner ll

    #2
    I don't have too much advice on the haul or bring it up yourself. If I had the money, I'd run it up myself. It's a trip of a lifetime, I'm sure.

    Welcome to the NW. You'll love the boating here. Best of luck on your decision.

    Comment


      #3
      If you are willing to take the time necessary to learn the local conditions, and wait for good weather windows there is no reason you cannot run a 4788 anywhere along a coastline.

      People get in trouble when they get in a hurry, or fail to learn about specific local conditions.

      I know very little about the California coast, but it is my understanding there are some specific weather patterns that are time of day dependent during certain months that can make the trip into a nightmare.

      I am anticipating taking my 4788 south at some point. There's no doubt I'll make the trip myself. There's also no doubt that I'll plan the trip properly and take enough time to make the trip safely.

      KEVIN SANDERS
      4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
      www.transferswitch4less.com

      Whats the weather like on our boat
      https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


      Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

      Comment


        #4
        In terms of where to live, do you plan to live aboard or live ashore and moor the boat in Puget Sound? Finding moorage for your 47 may be harder than finding a place to live ashore. The Tacoma area is in middle of Puget Sound and anywhere can be explored on a weekend. Further North like Edmonds or Everett is closer to the San Juan islands.
        Started boating 1965
        Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

        Comment


          #5
          We looked at houses and a couple of marinas. Should we just pull the trigger, living aboard until circumstances allow, is a definite maybe.

          Joe
          Joe
          2001 5288
          Lucky Liner ll

          Comment


            #6
            Port of Everett is a pretty easy jump to anywhere and offers some nice moorage. It's the largest public marina on the West Coast and is only getting nicer each year. Lots to do, close to many great communities to live ashore. Not to mention the thousands of miles of boating to explore in the Sound, San Juan / Gulf Islands and points north. You can't go wrong. Welcome to the NorthWest.
            Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

            iBoatNW

            1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

            Comment


              #7
              Getting your boat up around Pt. Conception and on to San Francisco is going to be a hump. Going from SF up the northern CA coast, Oregon to Washington is going to be a hump. And a very costly hump. Your boat can probably do it but can you?

              If I had the option of driving it myself or putting it on a ship I'd take the ship.

              If you decide to take it up yourself, I can give you some CA coastal pointers good to around Bodega Bay. There are many good coastal pilot books for the west coast that are helpful too.

              Comment


                #8
                As far as places to line in the PACNW, I'm a country boy at heart.

                The whole Seattle and suburbs thing is 100% unappealing.

                I could live in the Anacortes, Laconnor area though.

                Thats some pretty country!

                And it rains what 1/2 of the Seattle area?

                KEVIN SANDERS
                4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                www.transferswitch4less.com

                Whats the weather like on our boat
                https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                Comment


                  #9
                  ksanders wrote:
                  As far as places to line in the PACNW, I'm a country boy at heart.

                  The whole Seattle and suburbs thing is 100% unappealing.

                  I could live in the Anacortes, Laconnor area though.

                  Thats some pretty country!

                  And it rains what 1/2 of the Seattle area?
                  Must be the new math. Seattle 36 inches per year. LaConner 33 inches per year.
                  Started boating 1965
                  Bayliners owned: 26 Victoria, 28 Bounty, 32, 38, and 47 since 1996

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Yachtpath or dockwise will be in the $10k range, and you're on their schedule. Bringing her uphill from SoCal to Puget Sound is best done between June and September, always watching the weather. There are plenty of fueling stops and weather holes available. Once you get north of Point Conception, the weather becomes more of a factor- plan on enough crew to run your boat in any conditions. Kevin put it best- plan, research, and execute.

                    Once you get up here, you'll find the cruising is vastly different from California coastal cruising. You'll need to know how to properly anchor, as well as become more vigilant on your watches- there are all types of obstructions in the water that you never see down south. You'll also find this is truly God's country, especially the further north you go in the Sound. You'll be fine without thrusters here. About the only place to be wary of is the Swinomish Channel, which runs from skagit Bay to Padilla Bay, has become heavily silted and has been reported to be as shallow as 2 feet at low tides.

                    There are liveaboard slips available- the further from Seattle you get, the more abundant they are. It's a great lifestyle- as I type, Kathy and I are looking over Lake Union, enjoying a glass of wine and the peaceful serenity of the water. Living aboard is an exercise in simplification and lack of stress.....

                    Welcome!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      mmichellich wrote:
                      Must be the new math. Seattle 36 inches per year. LaConner 33 inches per year.
                      This is what I was talking about, from wikepedia

                      Anacortes is on http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu...Fidalgo Island. It is surrounded by the north http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu.../> Puget Sound and http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu...n Juan Islands on three sides, and by the Swinomish Channel and the flats of http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu... Skagit Valley to the east. The weather is milder than other areas of the http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu...ific Northwest, because it lies within the http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu...ympic Mountain http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu.../> rain shadow. Fidalgo Island gets 21 inches of rain per year, only half as much as http://"http://www.baylinerownersclu...<br /> Seattle.

                      KEVIN SANDERS
                      4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                      www.transferswitch4less.com

                      Whats the weather like on our boat
                      https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                      Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                      Comment


                        #12
                        He's correct Kevin. LaConner gets their fair share of rain.

                        There are actually 37 states that get more average annual rainfall than Washington state (with Alaska getting over twice our rainfall).

                        Also... Washington summers are in the top ten driest among all states:

                        1 California

                        2 Nevada

                        3 Utah

                        4 Oregon

                        5 Idaho

                        6 Washington

                        7 Wyoming

                        8 Arizona

                        9 Colorado & Montana (tie)

                        10 New Mexico

                        (state averages)
                        Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                        iBoatNW

                        1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

                        Comment


                          #13
                          SomeSailor wrote:
                          He's correct Kevin. LaConner gets their fair share of rain.

                          There are actually 37 states that get more average annual rainfall than Washington state (with Alaska getting over twice our rainfall).

                          Also... Washington summers are in the top ten driest among all states:

                          1 California

                          2 Nevada

                          3 Utah

                          4 Oregon

                          5 Idaho

                          6 Washington

                          7 Wyoming

                          8 Arizona

                          9 Colorado & Montana (tie)

                          10 New Mexico

                          (state averages)
                          Ok Mike

                          So tell me about the rain shadow, in practical terms.

                          My understanding is that Anacortes is on the eastern edge of the rain shadow, go west and south and you get less and less rain.

                          Is this correct???

                          Now I'm curious.

                          KEVIN SANDERS
                          4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                          www.transferswitch4less.com

                          Whats the weather like on our boat
                          https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                          Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I'd say the Sequim / Port Townsend area get much more advantage than Laconner from the effects of "rain shadow", but it is indeed real. The prevailing winds "shadow" the normal flow of low pressure and onshore moisture resulting in drier weather.

                            I worked on Whidbey for a few years and can tell ya they get their share of rain though. The problem with living up that way is there is NOTHING really nearby in terms of work, social life, and the normal urban stuff. Nice area mind ya... and if retired, might be a great place to live (a bit flat and agricultural for my tastes).

                            Here's how the shadow works...


                            Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                            iBoatNW

                            1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

                            Comment


                              #15
                              SomeSailor wrote:
                              I'd say the Sequim / Port Townsend area get much more advantage than Laconner from the effects of "rain shadow", but it is indeed real. The prevailing winds "shadow" the normal flow of low pressure and onshore moisture resulting in drier weather.

                              I worked on Whidbey for a few years and can tell ya they get their share of rain though. The problem with living up that way is there is NOTHING really nearby in terms of work, social life, and the normal urban stuff. Nice area mind ya... and if retired, might be a great place to live (a bit flat and agricultural for my tastes).

                              Here's how the shadow works...

                              Thanks Mike

                              Before I moved to Alaska I lived in the Portland Vancouver area for several years and loved the weather. That was before the area "grew up" though.

                              Spent a week in Anacortes last fall and fell in love with the area. The admrial and I could move to an area like that. We are country people. For us, the concept of living in a subdivision, or having people all around would drive us insane. I'm getting nervous just thinking about it.

                              We'll see what the long term brings. We love Alaska but the winters are getting tough to deal with as we age.

                              KEVIN SANDERS
                              4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                              www.transferswitch4less.com

                              Whats the weather like on our boat
                              https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                              Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X