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    north to alaska-gctid366650

    am planning to bring my new to me 3988 up to Skagway mid may from Victoria. Have a ratheon 700 old chartplotter and am looking for enroute cmap c801 to fit. also interested to here if anyone else heading up around this time.Long time Yukoner, Dave

    #2
    We're leaving Anacortes on 21-April enroute for Seward Alaska.

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    www.transferswitch4less.com

    Whats the weather like on our boat
    https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


    Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

    Comment


      #3
      Hi Dave,

      Have you contacted the Skagway Harbormaster? I am assuming you will be mooring your boat there. The available moorage in Skagway is VERY limited especially for boats over 24' in length. Seems like everyone in the Yukon has upgraded to larger boats in the last few years (myself included).

      Comment


        #4
        Anyone making a trip through the inside passage shold have 1 spare shaft with nuts and a pair of props.

        Shafts are expensive to fly in.
        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
        Twin 350 GM power
        Located in Seward, AK
        Retired marine surveyor

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks Kevin will keep an eye open in the South East. Dale ... have chatted with Matt .. am on over 40 list transient for now.. thanks boatworkfl am working on the spares list and hope to be able to still float when its complete ! cheers

          Comment


            #6
            boatworkfl wrote:
            Anyone making a trip through the inside passage shold have 1 spare shaft with nuts and a pair of props.

            Shafts are expensive to fly in.
            My first trip to Alaska I replaced 2 shafts and was on the 3rd set of props when I got home

            Comment


              #7
              boatworkfl wrote:
              Anyone making a trip through the inside passage shold have 1 spare shaft with nuts and a pair of props.

              Shafts are expensive to fly in.
              My first trip to Alaska I replaced 2 shafts and was on the 3rd set of props when I got home. I now carry 2 spare shafts and 2 sets of spare props

              Comment


                #8
                dstorey wrote:
                Thanks Kevin will keep an eye open in the South East. Dale ... have chatted with Matt .. am on over 40 list transient for now.. thanks boatworkfl am working on the spares list and hope to be able to still float when its complete ! cheers
                The big thing to remember about spares is to carry enough to get you going again in most situations.

                Filters, belts, spare relays for the Cummins engines, etc...

                I do not carry spare props, or spare shafts. Getting even a prop put on requires a diver or a travel lift. Any place with a diver or a travel lift has air service. I can get props or a shaft in a couple of days. I've had to do it before at a very remote place. Flew in a diver on a float plane. He brought the props.

                The biggest tool you can have is a satellite phone. If you do not want to buy one, then rent one.

                KEVIN SANDERS
                4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                www.transferswitch4less.com

                Whats the weather like on our boat
                https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                Comment


                  #9
                  billsguns wrote:
                  My first trip to Alaska I replaced 2 shafts and was on the 3rd set of props when I got home. I now carry 2 spare shafts and 2 sets of spare props
                  Now you've gotten me very curious. What on earth could have happened during the trek through the inner passage that caused you to replace TWO shafts and be on your THIRD set of props? Curious minds want to know...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The logging industry in BC uses tugs to tow rafts of logs to mill as well as logging operations on barges that have large rafts of logs surrounded by log booms. Logs and debris sometimes floating just under or near the surface are easy to hit. The bottom is also mostly rock so an errant grounding usually causes damage to running gear. Running a boat in South East Alaska and BC North of Port Hardy is a sort of graduate school for boaters. Not everything is well charted and many places require local knowledge to safely navigate. The are few if any navigation aids. The water in South East Alaska is much cleaner than BC when it comes to logs and such as there is very little if any logging still ongoing. There are still rocks and many are not charted. this is a heads up place to boat.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      You might want to think about just going to Haines, there is plenty of Transit moorage there for larger boats. there is a day ferry(fast ferry) to skagway for a visit. good sailing I live in Juneau let me know if you need anything while your up here. AKBay2858:go-:go-:go-:go-

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Pemby wrote:
                        Hi Dave,

                        Have you contacted the Skagway Harbormaster? I am assuming you will be mooring your boat there. The available moorage in Skagway is VERY limited especially for boats over 24' in length. Seems like everyone in the Yukon has upgraded to larger boats in the last few years (myself included).
                        I have called around to all the cities in southeast.. there is a wait list of 2yrs to 10 yrs.. THATS nuts.. and iffin you get a temp spot slip, you arent assured to get power with it.. Skagway has NO empties, Wrangel, Hoonah or Angoon and Sitka, Valdez has a 10yr wait list alone...... good luck.. bring a generator for power.. and money for gas.. its hit 4.53 a gallon here

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Scary wrote:
                          The logging industry in BC uses tugs to tow rafts of logs to mill as well as logging operations on barges that have large rafts of logs surrounded by log booms. Logs and debris sometimes floating just under or near the surface are easy to hit. The bottom is also mostly rock so an errant grounding usually causes damage to running gear. Running a boat in South East Alaska and BC North of Port Hardy is a sort of graduate school for boaters. Not everything is well charted and many places require local knowledge to safely navigate. The are few if any navigation aids. The water in South East Alaska is much cleaner than BC when it comes to logs and such as there is very little if any logging still ongoing. There are still rocks and many are not charted. this is a heads up place to boat.
                          Dead heads can be a real problem, not as many as logs though, I have seen dead heads that only have a 2" knob at the top just barely above the water line, and when along side you coukd see a large log hanging verticle.
                          Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                          Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                          Twin 350 GM power
                          Located in Seward, AK
                          Retired marine surveyor

                          Comment


                            #14
                            There just seems to be a lot of you guys on the site who are able to cruise to Alaska. Sounds wonderful! Here in the Mississippi river we,re limited to the Gulf of mex. and Fla for our long distance cruising. We are however, going to cruise the trip to Alaska from Vancouver in June on the Princes cruise line. I'll be looking for other 4788's up there from the cruise ship. I know it won't be the same as being on your own boat but at least we'll be able to see some of the area. I'll tell the captain to honk if we see you guys LOL

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Scary wrote:
                              The are few if any navigation aids. The water in South East Alaska is much cleaner than BC when it comes to logs and such as there is very little if any logging still ongoing. There are still rocks and many are not charted. this is a heads up place to boat.
                              That being the case, I would see it pretty common (or more like commonsense) to use a forward looking sonar and to keep the speeds low.

                              Comment

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