Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hino coolant side cleaning-gctid364298

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Hino coolant side cleaning-gctid364298

    Time to replace coolant on the EH700's. I cleaned the seawater side of things two years ago, time to clean the coolant side getting ready for 90 degree seawater here in SW FL. Any one have any suggestions on how to get the coolant side of things clean? Thanks as always

    #2
    Hello tweeks,

    I will try and attach the original US marine flushing TSB here.

    Hope this helps

    Attached files cooling system tsb.pdf (31.7 KB)
    Northport NY

    Comment


      #3
      Is it possible to clean the seawater side by flushing, or is dissassembly required?

      Comment


        #4
        "Is it possible to clean the seawater side by flushing, or is dissassembly required?"

        You can take off the inlet and outlet and make a closed loop and then circulate a product like Ridlyme for a few hours and that might take some stuff out of there. To get out heavy deposits , cork, zinc pieces, impeller pieces, etc you will need to disassemble.

        Hope this helps
        Northport NY

        Comment


          #5
          Tom, I did mine 5 years ago. The engines would run above 200 degrees when you ran above 2500 rpm. After cleaning they run a tad under 175 and you can see the thermostat opening and closing on the gauge. The local Punta Gorda radiator shop kept the bundles for a week and could not get them clean. My son-in-law took them to a shop in Tampa that used some kind of ultrasound and they came back looking like new. You will probably need to take yours to Ft Myers to get a good cleaning.

          Mike

          Comment


            #6
            smitty477 wrote:
            "Is it possible to clean the seawater side by flushing, or is dissassembly required?"

            You can take off the inlet and outlet and make a closed loop and then circulate a product like Ridlyme for a few hours and that might take some stuff out of there. To get out heavy deposits , cork, zinc pieces, impeller pieces, etc you will need to disassemble.

            Hope this helps
            Thanks Smitty.

            That was what I had in mind, circulating some sort of cleaning fluid in a closed loop without running the engine. I Googled and found RYDLYME, but I cannot find a source for it i over here in Norway. I'm sure there is some similar product available in stores here. Is there any special material considerations I need to be aware of? I think there is no anodes in the system, but is there any other materials that may suffer severe damage if a wrong product is used?

            I was also thinking of circulatiog the cleaning fluid "in reverse" in the system, and possible flush out any larger deposits back to where they came from.

            Someone suggested to disconnect inlet and outlet, connect these to a separate tank, and circulate the fluid by running the engine. Exhaust cooling by connecting the garden hose to the exhaust elbow. This way the cleaning fluid would be heated, and better cleaning effect achieved. What do you think of this idea? I'm not sure what the exhaust elbow looks like inside, but suspect I would risk filling the engine with water if the water is running and the engine is stopped...?

            Comment


              #7
              "I Googled and found RYDLYME, but I cannot find a source for it i over here in Norway. I'm sure there is some similar product available in stores here."

              This is just one product that is utilized to clean industrail A/C and food services equipment for scale. There shoudl be alternatives that work without resorting to acids.

              Is there any special material considerations I need to be aware of?

              Avoid acids that could cause system damage or harm you or others unless you are extremely knowledgeable with their exact usage and safety.

              I think there is no anodes in the system, but is there any other materials that may suffer severe damage if a wrong product is used?

              Yes- plenty

              I was also thinking of circulatiog the cleaning fluid "in reverse" in the system, and possible flush out any larger deposits back to where they came from.

              I would not run and engine with these techniques. These engines will run cool even if much of cooling system is compromised. These flushing techniques can restore some cooling capablity but they do not replace a remove and clean procedure if waranted. Example - disconnect raw water intake at tran cooler and run hose to 5 gallon bucket , disconnect other side as it exits the manicooler and run throug a pump back to 5 gallon bucket. Let the solution run for 4-5 hours recirculating and not the condition that the cleaner is at returns. FWIW - we have also used this on A/C heat exchangers with very good results.

              This is not going to help plugs from zincs, cork, debris, impellers and heavy scale accumulation.

              If I can find pics later I will post them of a partially blocked system that was still sufficent to cool at full operating loads.

              Hope this helps
              Northport NY

              Comment


                #8
                Here are a couple of pictures of an end cap off of a manicooler showing the debri and the affect it can have on cooling.

                Please note that even in this case the engines were able to run full load (310 hp) without overheating and cruise normally at 16 knots or so at or below 175 degees. This is one of the key reasons to avoid allowing cork, zinc debri, impeller pieces etc down into the cooling lines. They will very likely proceed through the trans cooler - intercooler - and then take up residence in these smaller heat exchanger bundle tubes.

                Hope this helps

                http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b5...D550/ry%3D400/

                http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b5...D550/ry%3D400/
                Northport NY

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks again Smitty.

                  I will go for the circulation by a separate pump via a bucket as a first try.

                  During winter I have experienced overheating on both engines at full RPM's. I noticed the seawater flow with the exhaust outlet seemed to be very minor, and I also get some white smoke/steam on my port exhaust. I have replaced the raw water impeller on this engine, but didn't see any significant improvement out of exhaust. I will now try an "easy fix" by means of a cleaning of the raw water circuit before I disassemble anything.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Miss Ruby - Have you diagnosed a problem you are trying to address or are you applying treatment hoping that a remedy will be the outcome?

                    If you have an overheating problem in which you have not identified the problem I suggest you pursue the best diagnosis first.

                    If that should be the case then you could/would recieve much more valuable replies here if you supply much more data.

                    Things such as this as example:

                    - engine years types and hours

                    - maintenance history

                    - All symptoms

                    - Did the problem come on sudden or slowly

                    - What is known good if anything (tachs, temp gages, fuel, props, bottom condition, rwp ,etc)

                    hope this helps
                    Northport NY

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hey Guys! The hino bulletin talked about a suitable cooling system cleaner for the coolant side. When you are doing 14 gallons of capacity, that can get expensive. Anyone know what is in radiator cleaner?

                      I did the salt water side by circulating half ospho and water in a five gallon bucket with a my back up submersable bilge pump and doing it until it stopped foaming. Adapt the hose sizes and run it into where the salt water enters the manicooler and then take a hose from where it goes into the elbow back to the bucket, or backward if you want to flush particles that may be stuck on the up stream side of the bundles. Worked wonders, no more overheat on the port at flank speed.

                      It's time to do the other side now. I read about a mixture of muriatic acid but I'm a little shy about that one. Not trying to dissolve barnicles which acid does quite well at.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I ran across this post on a Ford Pick Up bulletin board.

                        For what it's worth.. A few years back when I was a parts guy at a Freightliner dealership, the tech's there used Cascade automatic dishwasher soap. Those Detroits, Cats & Cummins held a lot more fluid that our trucks do but the techs would drain the coolant, refill with one whole container of Cascade and the rest was water. Run the engine until hot then drain and flush/rinse with plain water. I could not believe how clean Cascade got things. I used it on my F150 once since then, inside of the radiator came as clean as it was when new

                        Might be just the thing

                        Comment


                          #13
                          smitty477 wrote:
                          Miss Ruby - Have you diagnosed a problem you are trying to address or are you applying treatment hoping that a remedy will be the outcome?

                          If you have an overheating problem in which you have not identified the problem I suggest you pursue the best diagnosis first.

                          If that should be the case then you could/would recieve much more valuable replies here if you supply much more data.

                          Things such as this as example:

                          - engine years types and hours

                          - maintenance history

                          - All symptoms

                          - Did the problem come on sudden or slowly

                          - What is known good if anything (tachs, temp gages, fuel, props, bottom condition, rwp ,etc)

                          hope this helps
                          Thanks again for good advise.

                          I have some more data/history below:

                          - engine years types and hours

                          Hino 310HP, Year 1994, approx. 1500 hours

                          - maintenance history

                          I don't have any written history, only what I have been told by PO:

                          First owner, purchased the boat new in 1994 in Germany. Owner had all manitenance/service done by shipyard in Germany. That's all I know....

                          Second owner. Brought the boat to Norway in 2007. Only "light maintenance" performed, change oil/filter, belts, impellers. Internal cleaning of the fresh water circuit performed 3 years ago, again, according to PO.

                          I am third owner, purchased the boat last summer. I'm now reading the workshop manual and trying to catch up on all details that may have been neglected.... Plan is to be on track with regular maintenance according to the book by the end of this year.

                          - All symptoms

                          - Did the problem come on sudden or slowly

                          The engines have been running perfectly for about 100 hours, 90% of the time at around 1500-1800 rpms and no signs of any cooling problems. The problem was discovered 3 months ago, when I ran at full speed for a while (approx. 10minutes) at the end of a long trip at slow speed. The alarm went off as the engine overheated, and I could also notice quite much "white smoke/steam" from the port engine, as mentioned. I also suspect the raw water flow is lower than normal (not measured exactly, but comparing visually the port engine flows less than the SB). Changed the port impeller, no wear on the old one, and this didn't increase the flow significantly. I guess a total raw water pump overhaul is next if cleaning doesn't help....

                          - Did the problem come on sudden or slowly

                          Hard to tell.... Haven't really had engines running at full speed for any longer periods, so this may have been there from we bought the boat.

                          For a couple of weeks now, my focus has been on replacement of sanitation hoses. All removed, and new ones coming in. Lots of good hints were found in another thread here, and I will add some of my experience in that thread when complete.

                          So now I will soon return to the next step in this cooling issue, and my first step will be circulation of some cleaning product as advised.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            "So now I will soon return to the next step in this cooling issue, and my first step will be circulation of some cleaning product as advised."

                            Please try and reduce the issue to one of two areas if possible before performing a bunch of work - it may save you in the long run.

                            1. Raw water flow issues - all related to water flow volume through the raw water side

                            - seacocks plugged

                            - hoses collapsing

                            - poor impellers

                            - restricted flow at x-changer, lost impeller prices and dedri blocking tubes

                            - restricted flow at exhaust elbow

                            Note - many of the 310 Hinos have 1" 'pipe plugs' in the incoming end cap for the manicooler.This allows for a rather simple inspection of the tube bundle ends for blockages with proper tools.

                            2. Heat transfer at the X-changer

                            - this is almost always caused by a 'mud' build up on the coolant side

                            Some things to look for here - a large deposit at the bottom of the overflow bottles, look under the rad cap and see if their is a heavy mud covering on the outer bundle directly below.

                            Of course it could be something like a thermostat or other items but with this description so far it is likely one or the other above.

                            If it is not within #1 above it is very likely the manicoolers will need to come off for a good cleaning.

                            Hope this helps
                            Northport NY

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X