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4587 MY Seakeeping Maneuverability

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    4587 MY Seakeeping Maneuverability

    We are looking at a 4587, which appears to be a 40XX aft-cabin with 5 ft factory cockpit extension. Bayliner only made these for a few years in the mid-90's. The prop ends at the orginal end of the aft cabin, but the rudders are about 4 ft aft under the end the cockpit. Every other Bayliner MY we've seen has the rudder within about 1 ft of the prop. Does the 4 ft separation noticeably or sharply reduce maneuverability? Any other comments on 4587 handling or seakeeping? Performance with 250 vs 300hp engines? Other 4587 likes/dislikes? Thanks for your thoughts, Doug S.
    Last edited by Jim_Gandee; 05-09-2020, 08:49 PM.

    #2
    The 3587/4087 family is similar to what you describe: the 4087 is the 3587 with the cockpit extension, and the running gear on both are the same (4087 running gear is about 5 ft forward of the stern).

    I find the handling of the 4087 just fine, with no hindrances. It's just a factor of learning how the vessel responds to commands with the pivot point where it it. Some have said the additional cockpit of the 4087 gives the boat better riding characteristics than its sister 3587.

    I have the Cummins 250, and have great performance. With the larger vessel, the smaller engines may be overtaxed....

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      #3
      So take this with a grain of salt as I have no personal experience. I was told the cockpit extension caused the boat to be hard to handle in following sea conditions. I think you have valid concern. Not many of us really boat in conditions that test these boats near their sea keeping ceiling, they are designed as coastal cruisers not ocean going vessels. They do what they do better than most boats, and that's provide a solid well laid out boat for mostly protected water that has the ability to go slow or fast and run fairly economically. For 90% of use they're hard to beat. The question your asking is important if you intend to run offshore in rough conditions, not many really do this intentionally.

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        #4
        Thanks Sean & Scary, Sounds like steerage is OK despite the distance between the props & rudders, but following seas might be a concern. We operate in north Puget Sound and beyond - in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and connecting waters, there are often large swells/following seas (5 to 10 ft), and often a good chop on top of that (1 to 3 ft). Thanks again, Doug S.

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          #5
          I don't know about the 4587 but I do know the 4087 and can tell you that the rudders are not that far away from the props. The prop shaft goes through the hull at the forward wall of the aft cabin. So the props end near the aft wall of the aft cabin. The rudder seals are also at the aft wall of the aft cabin. So I question that there really is such a large gap between the props and the rudders.
          Evan
          2001 Bayliner 4788 "Fifty / Fifty II"
          League City, TX

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            #6
            Here's a shot of my 4087 props and rudders. Having the props in from the stern a by a few feet makes for great maneuverability. She will spin in her own length easily.





            Not a great pic, but you can see how far in the props are from the transom, but close to the rudders.

            It doesn't like like following seas (but nor do I). If you get caught out, make sure trim tabs are up all the way and ensure you are going faster than the fetch-obvious, but this will help keep the bow up and stop her burying itself. Not sure about the 4587, but the 4087 is a tad bow heavy and will nose in a bit if you don't watch it.

            Big issue I have, having no thrusters, is that docking in strong winds can be a challenge. Just make sure you and your crew are well prepared.

            If its on dock wind, lots of fenders and you can't go wrong. Off dock, take her in with bow almost perpendicular to the dock as close as you dare then power round with off dock engine and get your crew ready to step on the dock with a short tie center line. If you just get a bow or stern line on in strong off-dock winds, she will not pivot round, or I can't get her to.

            Machog
            1996 4087 Lazy Days
            2011 11’ West Marine Rib 350 Lazy Mac
            2011 Porsche Cayman
            2010 Lexus IS 250C
            2008 Honda Ridgeline

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              #7
              Seakeeping in a following sea in a power boat is almost always difficult. On the 4087, presumably, because the props and rudders are far forward certainly can amplify this a touch. But really, at the end of the day, I have never felt the boat is overwhelmed. We've had ours in all sorts of water, and other than the assumed uncomfortablness it isn't too bad.

              I passed a buddy of mine who has a Nordhaven 40. He had his stabilizers out, but was only capable of 6 knots. When I blew by him in a 3 foot following sea at 18 knots, even he said my bayliner looked very attractive to him and his family at that point.

              And I had my feet up on the dash as my German Captain, Auto Von Pilot, was doing all the work.

              I really wouldn't worry about it.

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                #8
                Indeed- I've never had a problem with the boat feeling out of sorts in a following sea, and we've seen our fair share.

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                  #9
                  I own a 4587 bought the boat 3years ago so I have experienced some rough seas in the Georgia strait and further north. The boat handles extremely well. I was looking at a 4087 originally but the 4587 came on the market and I was told to go the extra length for a better ride .I have no complaints to this point. I like the extra living space and the lines of the 4587 just my personal choice.

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                    #10
                    Welcome BC, you are answering a thread from 2012.
                    P/C Pete
                    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                    MMSI 367770440

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                      #11
                      I also can not speak to the 4587 but I owned a 4387 and it was the best close quarter handling boat I have driven. I also am a part time broker so I have had the chance to drive quite a few boats. I think you will love the 4587 it is a great layout.
                      Bruce
                      1989 4550 MoneyTaker III
                      "It is not the size of your boat it is how often you use it"

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