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    #16
    Originally posted by kwb View Post
    For Kevin doing this solo is the challenge - keep in mind he ran the boat up from WA when he bought it. I think he has done this trip a few times actually if I remember my BOC history.

    I normally am not a fan of interfaced autopilot but in this case I think it actually may be an enhancement to safety. That and a timer/alarm. Worst case on autopilot is that he falls asleep and runs aground close to final destination (where there are people). I say that because the odds of being on exactly same course of another boat where skipper is off watch are pretty slim in that part of the world.
    Yes, Thanks! i have made this exact journey twice. Once in this boat, and once in my 3488.

    Both of these trips were the exact same route, only reversed.

    Both were delivery cruises so we traveled in weather that i will not travel in as a retiree. Both had one other person on board.

    and yes... The personal challenge is to me doing it alone.

    I am starting on the rest of my life cruising. I cannot wuss out and not even be able to leave the dock alone as the start to that life.

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA


    Whats the weather like on the boat
    https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


    Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

    Comment


      #17
      +1 to Jim Gandee. Indeed, I experienced such a mishap and know the feeling. Many years ago I took a multi-day trip (with 2 companions) on a 25ft powerboat (Stingray 250CS) and cruised slightly more than 500nm. I was careful(?) about my fuel consumption and stopped at every opportunity to add fuel to the boat. The 3rd leg of my trip was a long trip and despite my careful(?) calculation it became clear that I was short of fuel. I had a lot of stress for much of that leg and finally ran out of fuel about 1mi before the harbor. I had to drop anchor and wait for a tow. I was in deep waters, deeper than my rode but it gave me a piece of mind to know that at as I was being dragged closer to the rocks along the shore at some point the anchor would take hold. The story had a good/happy ending but I learned my lesson.

      I advise you to take extra fuel with you and figure out an easy/safe way to transfer that fuel into the tank singlehandedly before you run out. Indeed, if you stop at anchor overnight that would be a good time to transfer the fuel.

      Good luck
      Retired, computer expert / executive
      Bayliner 285 Cruiser / Mercruiser QSD 4.2L 320 HP Diesel
      Live in the Bay Area, CA, USA, boat in Turkey
      D-Marin @ Turgutreis in Bodrum/Turkey
      [email protected]
      [email protected]

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by aknurse View Post
        My take is this: You are going to have plenty of daylight to make the trip that time of year. You're going to be excited about your journey. Both make staying awake much easier. I work 12 hour night shifts and often stay up far longer than 24 hours to "flip" Sometimes we just have to do what we have to do. That's what it takes to get the job done. Regardless, take some extra fuel capacity.
        As a nurse you understand shift work. I currently work as a power grid operator at MEA in Palmer. 12 hour shifts starting and ending at 6:30
        When on night shift it is me alone, no backup. I have to make good decisions, just like a nurse on duty at night. Just like the fireman, and just like the 911 dispatchers that I talk to almost every night.

        KEVIN SANDERS
        4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA


        Whats the weather like on the boat
        https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


        Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Jim_Gandee View Post
          First thought …TAKE ADDITIONAL FUEL! Water conditions may necessitate running at higher speeds to keep the wallowing down. You may not be able to take the most direct route thereby increasing distance, unfavorable current/winds/seas, etc. all increase fuel usage. More fuel equals more options, including speed increase to shorten the leg time. The last thing you need on a long, solo journey is the stress of possible fuel shortage. You can fix a lot of mechanical problems but you can’t make more diesel! Running out of fuel equals rocks, end of trip, possible death. I suppose I’m a fuel freak so don’t mean to over emphasize the obvious.

          Naps equals increased risk of hitting an object. That said, in the real world of a 24 hr trip you aren’t staring straight ahead looking FOD at all times. Therefore naps are risk/benefit assessment. If the conditions permitted, I’d set an alarm and take short naps. Heck, you’ll probably fall asleep anyway out of boredom just rocking in your helm chair! Set an alarm!

          If you simply must remain awake you might have plenty of coffee or Red Bull aboard and available if required. Eating sunflower seeds and sucking on ice helps too.

          How much and what portion of this leg will be at night?

          If you do carry addition fuel what’s your plan for refueling? This can be a critical phase as obviously you don’t want any water to enter the fill ports during the process and You sure don’t want to be running around on the deck while underway. Quick story….while running a 65’ Hatteras sportfisher to PUerto Vallarta, my watch was 0000-0400. Very dark night, no moon. About 0200 I climbed down from the FB to use the head. While standing in the cockpit, a mere 3 ft away from the ocean rushing past, I realized how thin the line sometimes is between life and death. With the rest of the crew sleeping no one would have known where/when I went over. That would have been it for me and you have no crew to help you either!
          Excellent advice Jim!

          The last time i made this trip was the same time of year in this same boat. I was able to run the last 100NM fully up on plane and still had an amazing amount of fuel when I reached seward.

          If I travel at hull speed all the way, and using a very conservative fuel economy that has been measured in open ocean conditions I am looking at burning 1/2 of my boats fuel capacity.

          I agree that fuel gives choices and that I why I will probably bring the fuel jugs I already have and fill up the tanks while at a peaceful anchorage after the first leg.

          I carry, and have used pumps and hoses to move the fuel and even carry spares.

          Many winters I have topped off the tanks from these jugs as opposed to blowing all the RV antifreeze out of the engines to run to the fuel dock.

          Oh... The first rule of solo cruising... NEVER pee overboard when underway. Too easy to die.

          KEVIN SANDERS
          4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA


          Whats the weather like on the boat
          https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


          Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

          Comment


          • Jim_Gandee
            Jim_Gandee commented
            Editing a comment
            NEVER pee overboard when underway. Too easy to die.

            If you can actually accomplish this task God has blessed you with proportions exceeding even the most demanding of the opposite sex! 😁

          • ksanders
            ksanders commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, it is a lot funner in warm water. That Alaska water gets Cold!!!

          #20
          I can see Kevin's boat "Lisas Way" on the "MarineTraffic" app. on my iPhone.Last info on it, 1month 13 days ago, shows it at 0 kn speed at Seaward. If he does not shut down his AIS xceiver I can track him during his planned trip.

          Good luck Kevin,
          Retired, computer expert / executive
          Bayliner 285 Cruiser / Mercruiser QSD 4.2L 320 HP Diesel
          Live in the Bay Area, CA, USA, boat in Turkey
          D-Marin @ Turgutreis in Bodrum/Turkey
          [email protected]
          [email protected]

          Comment


            #21
            Kevin- not sure if you already have one but I found a 12v DC diesel fuel transfer pump on-line for about $130 IIRC. Trying to refill the tanks while standing on our tiny side deck would be near impossible not to mention dangerous at night in a choppy anchorage.
            Just something to think about.
            Drew Haas
            1998 4788 "Painkiller"

            Comment


              #22
              Originally posted by drewhaas View Post
              Kevin- not sure if you already have one but I found a 12v DC diesel fuel transfer pump on-line for about $130 IIRC. Trying to refill the tanks while standing on our tiny side deck would be near impossible not to mention dangerous at night in a choppy anchorage.
              Just something to think about.
              Thanks!!!

              I really like the Jabsco handy puppy pumps. Have a few on board.

              Good thing is that if I open the window the fuel fill is right there so this can be done safely from inside

              KEVIN SANDERS
              4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA


              Whats the weather like on the boat
              https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


              Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

              Comment


                #23
                Kevin - I know you are experienced especially with your boat but man that's a long time to solo and in nowhere land where it can get really rough and there are tons of variables that aren't being spoken of other than logs. your scenarios are perfect world traveling, which we all know mother nature doesn't often give us but, for this journey for you, I most certainly hope she does! Keep in mind you did ask "what would you do"...Me, I'd never think of doing it alone, ever. If I'm starting the rest of my life cruising I'd make sure I have the rest of my life and not tempt mother nature to prematurely expedite that time frame! I certainly understand the solidarity of boating and the joy of being at the helm but, where you're traveling I think it's a bit different. Sure others have noted, extra fuel, water etc...all great advice but since you've asked....bring someone, fly them home as soon as you reach land, and begin from there, hardly "wussing out". Working an extended shift on land and 22-27 hours at sea alone are vastly different. I am not doubting your skill or your vessel. I'm sure you're quite well prepared and I'll share that I'll be at ease once I read a "land fall" post from you man! Best of luck with your planning and journey!
                1997 Bayliner 2588 Cierra 7.4 Bravo 1 - Mahal
                (past)1997 Bayliner 4788 w/330 Cummins - Phoenix
                (past) 1987 Bayliner 3218 w/135 Hino - True Story

                Comment


                  #24
                  Kevin, make sure you keep a bottle of chewable Meclizine in one pocket and a 38 revolver in the other “just in case”.

                  Comment


                    #25
                    Being a former Anchorage resident for 17 yrs, I just finished liquidating most of my possessions there in Oct. Very familiar with Seward and the Gulf, but I've never ventured much past the mouth of Resurrection Bay. Retired from the military just over a year ago and brought my '97 4788 up from Alameda last April. If you're deadset (pardon the term) on going solo, I wish you the best of luck. But if you're looking for a semi-competent back-up deckhand, I'll do the trip down as far as Astoria (I'm in Vancouver WA), or even a bit further if you want. Just a thought...
                    1997 Bayliner 4788
                    'Southern Charm'
                    Vancouver WA

                    Comment


                      #26
                      Kevin, nothing but respect for whichever way you decide to tackle this. I look forward to following your adventure.
                      Ron & Kellie
                      Just Us 2 - 2001 4788
                      New to us September 2020
                      Moored in Coal Harbour

                      Comment


                        #27
                        You are leaving this beauty behind? That is Homer on the descend into ANC coming from Tokyo. I also have irregular schedules, and timezones to deal with. It is not easy to keep your eyes open at 0500 when the sun gets up after having sat in your seat for 20 hours, and you just stare across a never changing landscape. At some point even coffee doesn't do anything anymore. Your body falls asleep and you are along for the ride,
                        I had once a week of nothing but turbulence, thunderstorms and fog flying 5 nights between Tulsa and Cincinnati. I came home on Saturday at 2pm and fell straight in bed, and woke up to the Sunday NFL at 4 pm, slept 26 hours straight, never woke up. That scared the hell out of me. Now when I see guys bobbing their heads I tell them to put the seat back and close the eyes. That way I can do it later, and someone is awake. Good luck.
                        Attached Files
                        1989 2159 Trophy Hardtop
                        5.8L OMC Cobra
                        2 1/2 year restoration project after "all you need to do is put the rebuilt engine back in".
                        Mountlake Terrace, WA

                        Comment


                          #28
                          Originally posted by Metrodriver View Post
                          You are leaving this beauty behind? That is Homer on the descend into ANC coming from Tokyo. I also have irregular schedules, and timezones to deal with. It is not easy to keep your eyes open at 0500 when the sun gets up after having sat in your seat for 20 hours, and you just stare across a never changing landscape. At some point even coffee doesn't do anything anymore. Your body falls asleep and you are along for the ride,
                          I had once a week of nothing but turbulence, thunderstorms and fog flying 5 nights between Tulsa and Cincinnati. I came home on Saturday at 2pm and fell straight in bed, and woke up to the Sunday NFL at 4 pm, slept 26 hours straight, never woke up. That scared the hell out of me. Now when I see guys bobbing their heads I tell them to put the seat back and close the eyes. That way I can do it later, and someone is awake. Good luck.
                          61 days and counting!

                          KEVIN SANDERS
                          4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA


                          Whats the weather like on the boat
                          https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                          Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

                          Comment

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