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getting towed home by a dinghy-gctid358063

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  • captharv
    replied
    pugetsounder wrote:
    I'm not trying to start any unnecessary drama or anything but it seems to me that pushing a boat from the stern with a dinghy would be dangerous and just bad advice. And furthermore saying you can't tow a boat with a dinghy is luducrous. Just my $0.02
    +1 Now yer talkin'.

    A 10' dinghy with a 10 HP motor will indeed easily tow and more importantly CONTROL a 25' boat being towed.

    [B]Provided: [B]

    1. The towing boat is rigged with a proper bridle, towline and connection to the towed boat.

    2. The operator of the dinghy has had some training in towing.

    3. Stay within the hull speed of the SMALLER vessel. 10' dinghy, somewhere just below 4 Kts.

    You DO NOT tow alongside ("hip tow") in open water. The wave action becomes trrapped between the boats and becomes a shower into boat boats. Alongside is when you are trying to place the disabled boat into a slip or marine railway.

    As I keep saying, get some training if you are going to attempt this.

    Pushing a 6000# boat with a dinghy is even more dangerout. A boat wake could deposit the towed boat on top of the dinghy, post haste.

    For those who have done this and survived, you were just dam lucky.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm not trying to start any unnecessary drama or anything but it seems to me that pushing a boat from the stern with a dinghy would be dangerous and just bad advice. And furthermore saying you can't tow a boat with a dinghy is luducrous. Just my $0.02

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  • SomeSailor
    replied
    The look on the face of this guy's wife was priceless.


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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I wish I could find the picture of me towing a 3055 in using my Sea Doo. I even pushed it right into its slip in a light wind by whipping it around on the tow rope then bumping it with the Sea Doo.

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  • Stratocaster
    replied
    hfxjack wrote:
    You cannot tow your boat with the 10' dinghy. You main boat is too heavy and it will wonder in the wind and current, but you can push it very easily. I have pushed my 2855 with 10' 9.9 several times you can even dock it.
    Sorry man....not entirely true. ^^ As Tally alluded to previously ^^, I blew my engine at Beaver Point on Saltspring Island. I towed the boat all the way to Ganges Marina, a distance of, what, 5 miles? I had a 10 ft Bombard, plywood floor dinghy, powered by a 7.5hp Merc 2 stroke. I strung all 6 of my docklines together as a tow rope. GPS said we were making 4.6 knots, which was fine with me. All I noticed was that as I gave it more throttle, the boat kept going straight but the dinghy yawed from side to side, while going no faster. There was a sweet spot where the dinghy stayed straight and the big boat followed her just fine. I know it would have worked 1000% better if I had used a towing bridle. So, if you're considering this, buy one.

    Incidentally, I looped the boat around in a perfectly executed u-turn, into the wind...jumped aboard and dropped the anchor. The marina then sent a bigger boat out to get me and bring me into the marina.

    So, towing a boat with a dinghy is perfectly do-able.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Helped a friend move his 28' Carver from one marina to another. There was little if any wind or current. He towed using his dink. When we got to the other marina, he used the dink as a tugboat to push the boat into the slip.

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  • captharv
    replied
    Popcorn? anyone

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Agreed Ron.

    I've had slightly better success when towing ragbaggers (which is a rather frequent occurence*), and I attribute it to their much larger keel and rudder area. Still, if there's any close-quareters maneuvering to do at all, I tie up tight and act as thrust while they provide steering.

    *Why don't the ragbaggers maintain their engines and filters??? It's not like you see them with their sails up.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    whiskywizard wrote:
    +1 Ron; the hip tow is the best way.

    I have tried it with my Bayliner 3888 and an 11' RIB with 15HP outboard. I have also tried it with my Tiara (>48' & >30,000lb) using the same RIB with a 25HP outboard. In both cases, simply towing from a bow line was almost impossible. Couldn't maintain a straight line. .
    I tried dinghy towing a 25' sailboat from the bow and had the same expirience, Mike. We looked like drunken sailors (both of us!) No way to keep the boats going straight.

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  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    Mattmm wrote:
    I'm concidering nixing my kicker for the extra swim platform space but dont like the idea of not having a backup. I was wondering if anyone has used a dinghy 10 ft or so with a 8-10Hp engine to tow their boat. how reliable is this? I have a flybridge so wind can be a very big factor.
    Matt, you're on the right track, IMO. Here's why...., and again, IMO.

    Your 25 footer is going to feel a kicker mounted to the stern. No doubt about it.

    It's going to affect planing hull attitude in that your NOW kicker has added to the stern weight, where you'll already have your tender on Davits, I presume.

    Until we get up to lets say 28 foot and above, and into wider beams, stern weight definitely affects planing ability.

    talman wrote:
    I've known more than one person tow their boat for miles with their dinks and smaller HP. I wouldn't recommend it as "the" plan as weather/current/time are all a factor. Strat pulled his 2655 quite a ways with his.
    As Tally said, it can be done.

    Given the likihood and number of times that you'd need to do this, I'd say it will work in a pinch.

    Kill two birds (lighten your stern) with the same stone.

    If it's extremely windy, drop anchor and call for a tow.

    .

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    It can be done, with no wind and current its easy, my dinghy had two eyes outboard on the stern. I had a line that went to both of the eyes and had a loop tied in the middle that was then tied to a line tied to the cleat on the front of the boat. Worked fine on 30' boat, marginal or bigger. Jetski (supercharged 210+hp) even pulls my 47' boat like a champ. Docking can be tricky, call ahead and ask the maina for a couple guys to assist, give them the line to pull the boat into the dock nice and slow.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    hfxjack wrote:
    This was the first I tried because I read about it. Very good in going if you want to go in a circle. I think this would work with two boats of equal mass but not when one is 10,000 lbs and the other 500 lbs
    When tied properly, you don't have 2 vessels of differing mass/displacement. Rather, you have 1 vessel whose outboard is offset from the centreline. When you start the push, it does tend to turn the big vessel. Once you get some headway on, rudder offset straightens you out.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    +1 Ron; the hip tow is the best way.

    I have tried it with my Bayliner 3888 and an 11' RIB with 15HP outboard. I have also tried it with my Tiara (>48' & >30,000lb) using the same RIB with a 25HP outboard. In both cases, simply towing from a bow line was almost impossible. Couldn't maintain a straight line. When hip-tied, it was easy and safe. The towed vessel does have to apply some rudder to allow for the offset thrust, but it's not an issue. Tied this way, you also have some reverse capability. Not much, but some.

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  • hfxjack
    replied
    ronlord wrote:
    You can do it with a "hip tow". Basically secure the dinghy to the side of your boat, with the stern of your dinghy close to the stern of your boat. Works almost like having the kicker on your swim platform.
    This was the first I tried because I read about it. Very good in going if you want to go in a circle. I think this would work with two boats of equal mass but not when one is 10,000 lbs and the other 500 lbs

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  • jmcannonball
    replied
    It can be done. Years ago I got stranded about 5 miles form Edmonds in my 1962 26' Chris Craft. I towed it back to port with my 8' Livingston and a 9.8hp Merc. Once inside the breakwater, I side-tied it and took it right into my slip.

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