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getting towed home by a dinghy-gctid358063

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    #16
    Agreed Ron.

    I've had slightly better success when towing ragbaggers (which is a rather frequent occurence*), and I attribute it to their much larger keel and rudder area. Still, if there's any close-quareters maneuvering to do at all, I tie up tight and act as thrust while they provide steering.

    *Why don't the ragbaggers maintain their engines and filters??? It's not like you see them with their sails up.

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      #17
      Popcorn? anyone
      Captharv 2001 2452
      "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

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        #18
        Helped a friend move his 28' Carver from one marina to another. There was little if any wind or current. He towed using his dink. When we got to the other marina, he used the dink as a tugboat to push the boat into the slip.

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          #19
          hfxjack wrote:
          You cannot tow your boat with the 10' dinghy. You main boat is too heavy and it will wonder in the wind and current, but you can push it very easily. I have pushed my 2855 with 10' 9.9 several times you can even dock it.
          Sorry man....not entirely true. ^^ As Tally alluded to previously ^^, I blew my engine at Beaver Point on Saltspring Island. I towed the boat all the way to Ganges Marina, a distance of, what, 5 miles? I had a 10 ft Bombard, plywood floor dinghy, powered by a 7.5hp Merc 2 stroke. I strung all 6 of my docklines together as a tow rope. GPS said we were making 4.6 knots, which was fine with me. All I noticed was that as I gave it more throttle, the boat kept going straight but the dinghy yawed from side to side, while going no faster. There was a sweet spot where the dinghy stayed straight and the big boat followed her just fine. I know it would have worked 1000% better if I had used a towing bridle. So, if you're considering this, buy one.

          Incidentally, I looped the boat around in a perfectly executed u-turn, into the wind...jumped aboard and dropped the anchor. The marina then sent a bigger boat out to get me and bring me into the marina.

          So, towing a boat with a dinghy is perfectly do-able.
          Mike P
          The Bahamas
          Formerly Vancouver BC, Bermuda and The Grenadine Islands.

          Click here to hear my original music, FREE to download to your computer or iPod.

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            #20
            I wish I could find the picture of me towing a 3055 in using my Sea Doo. I even pushed it right into its slip in a light wind by whipping it around on the tow rope then bumping it with the Sea Doo.

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              #21
              The look on the face of this guy's wife was priceless.


              Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

              iBoatNW

              1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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                #22
                I'm not trying to start any unnecessary drama or anything but it seems to me that pushing a boat from the stern with a dinghy would be dangerous and just bad advice. And furthermore saying you can't tow a boat with a dinghy is luducrous. Just my $0.02

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                  #23
                  pugetsounder wrote:
                  I'm not trying to start any unnecessary drama or anything but it seems to me that pushing a boat from the stern with a dinghy would be dangerous and just bad advice. And furthermore saying you can't tow a boat with a dinghy is luducrous. Just my $0.02
                  +1 Now yer talkin'.

                  A 10' dinghy with a 10 HP motor will indeed easily tow and more importantly CONTROL a 25' boat being towed.

                  [B]Provided: [B]

                  1. The towing boat is rigged with a proper bridle, towline and connection to the towed boat.

                  2. The operator of the dinghy has had some training in towing.

                  3. Stay within the hull speed of the SMALLER vessel. 10' dinghy, somewhere just below 4 Kts.

                  You DO NOT tow alongside ("hip tow") in open water. The wave action becomes trrapped between the boats and becomes a shower into boat boats. Alongside is when you are trying to place the disabled boat into a slip or marine railway.

                  As I keep saying, get some training if you are going to attempt this.

                  Pushing a 6000# boat with a dinghy is even more dangerout. A boat wake could deposit the towed boat on top of the dinghy, post haste.

                  For those who have done this and survived, you were just dam lucky.
                  Captharv 2001 2452
                  "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

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