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    First Aid kits?-gctid355747

    Putting together a first aid kit for the boat, and I've started with a couple of pre-packed kits (one for the boat, one fr the ditch/dinghy bag). But I'm curious what else folks pack. Ive added:

    Large dressings (several sizes)

    Hydrogen Peroxide

    Rubbing Alcohol

    Tylenol and Advil

    Pocket mask

    and I will be adding:

    Tensor bandage

    extra gauze

    extra bandages

    Anti-histamine

    calamine lotion

    etc.

    and I'm thinking about adding

    stapler (medical)

    etc.

    Our boating is pretty sane - but we do head out to areas where help can be at least several hours away, and we do boat with kids.

    So - any thoughts/ideas??
    ________________
    1989 Bayliner 3270

    #2
    B y stapler are you talking about something that does sutures?

    Comment


      #3
      I keep my hand held radio handy, the coast guard can get to me in about 1 hour by chopper.
      Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

      Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
      Twin 350 GM power
      Located in Seward, AK
      Retired marine surveyor

      Comment


        #4
        There is no end to the possible list of items. How far you are from medical aid is a huge factor.

        A good first aid manual is a good start.
        Jim McNeely
        New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
        Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
        Brighton, Michigan USA
        MMSI # 367393410

        Comment


          #5
          I have a couple kits I purchased that have served us well over the years.

          On your list the Anti-histamine is a very good idea, I keep benedryl aboard.

          Comment


            #6
            I just keep a good quality commercially available first aid kit on board. If an injury cannot be addressed with what we have on board, then a call to the coast guard / police would be in order.

            I did have one situation a number of years ago where a guest was injured and ultimately required a couple stitches. I'm not medically qualified, so I don't feel it would have been appropriate for me to administer stitches or other medical procedures absent any sort of professional medical training. We just buttoned him up and got him in to shore.

            I would be remiss in not pointing out that if you do choose to administer any sort of medical procedure, such as suturing a wound, you can and will be responsible should something happen as a result of your actions. Unless you have a "Dr." prefix attached to your name, you shouldn't be approaching anyone with a needle, stapler, or scalpel.
            Mocoondo
            2002 Bayliner 195 Capri
            Mercruiser 5.0L V8 / Alpha I Gen II
            MMSI: 338091755

            Comment


              #7
              JimMc wrote:
              There is no end to the possible list of items. How far you are from medical aid is a huge factor.

              A good first aid manual is a good start.
              I would take that a step farther, and recommend taking Red Cross standard and advanced first aid courses, along with CPR. As a former paramedic, I can tell you, once you learn it, it stays with you. One thing to add is a touriquet, and again, the knowledge of when and how to use it. The life you save may be your own...
              Jeff & Tara
              (And Ginger too)
              Lake Havasu City, AZ

              2000 Bayliner 3388
              "GetAway"
              Cummins 4bta 250s

              In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

              Comment


                #8
                Mocoondo wrote:
                I just keep a good quality commercially available first aid kit on board. If an injury cannot be addressed with what we have on board, then a call to the coast guard / police would be in order.

                I did have one situation a number of years ago where a guest was injured and ultimately required a couple stitches. I'm not medically qualified, so I don't feel it would have been appropriate for me to administer stitches or other medical procedures absent any sort of professional medical training. We just buttoned him up and got him in to shore.

                I would be remiss in not pointing out that if you do choose to administer any sort of medical procedure, such as suturing a wound, you can and will be responsible should something happen as a result of your actions. Unless you have a "Dr." prefix attached to your name, you shouldn't be approaching anyone with a needle, stapler, or scalpel.
                Ditto on the commercial first aid kit. Mine is from Cintas

                I agree with you and administering help. Last summer one of our friends children fell thru the open bow hatch and cut his head open. They raced back to the Marina as the gash in his head needed stiches. They applied pressure and kept him awake during the ride back and the wait for paramedics to take him to the hospital.

                Why do I tell this story? The Dad is a licensed nurse practitioner.
                Phil, Vicky, Ashleigh & Sydney
                1998 3055 Ciera
                (yes, a 1998)
                Previous boat: 1993 3055
                Dream boat: 70' Azimut or Astondoa 72
                Sea Doo XP
                Sea Doo GTI SE
                Life is short. Boats are cool.
                The family that plays together stays together.
                Vice Commodore: Bellevue Yacht Club

                Comment


                  #9
                  jeffw wrote:
                  I would take that a step farther, and recommend taking Red Cross standard and advanced first aid courses, along with CPR. As a former paramedic, I can tell you, once you learn it, it stays with you. One thing to add is a touriquet, and again, the knowledge of when and how to use it. The life you save may be your own...
                  As another former paramedic I would totaly agree. Training first, first aid kit second. But when you do add a kit include low dose asprin to be administered when a heart attack is suspected.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    In addition to basic bandages n topical, we keep some sort of liquid bandage. With kids we have had to use it a couple of times. It is easy and holds those small but deep bleeders together well. I have included a good burn cream (w/ silver sulfadiazine), a basic antibacterial cream (neosporin), anti-itch cream/spray and extras of our personal med (ex: pervental asthma inhaler). We also keep some sort of motion sickness related meds in our kit. Along with all this I have a book that outlines detailed info o n basic first aid should there ever be a reason the kids are in need and alone.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I used to be an EMT for our city ambulance service and have seen some pretty nasty stuff and some times you can never have enough first aid supplies. I would stay away from doing any type of permanent stapling or stitching. Most times direct pressure will work just as well if not better but even if you wanted to go that route, they make a "super glue" type application that will temporarily close wounds. One thing, if you ever take someone outside of your immediate family ask if they have any allergies such as bee stings and be sure they have an epi-pen. Other than that a basic first aid kit "on steroids" is about the best you can do. Have plenty of gauze, wraps, large wound dressings etc.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        In addition to basic bandages n topical, we keep some sort of liquid bandage. With kids we have had to use it a couple of times. It is easy and holds those small but deep bleeders together well. I have included a good burn cream (w/ silver sulfadiazine), a basic antibacterial cream (neosporin), anti-itch cream/spray and extras of our personal med (ex: pervental asthma inhaler). We also keep some sort of motion sickness related meds in our kit. Along with all this I have a book that outlines detailed info o n basic first aid should there ever be a reason the kids are in need and alone.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          For our kit I have put together this list

                          Cloth Adhesive Bandages (varying styles; strap, finger tip, knuckle, etc.)

                          Ace bandage 2 rolls

                          Cloth Medical Tape

                          Scissors Medical Type (One of the blades has a flat surface to go against the skin, also good for removing clothing to expose a wound)

                          Butterflies

                          Neosporin with Pain relief

                          Hydrogen Peroxide

                          Gauze Pads and Dresses

                          Triangle Bandage

                          First Aid book

                          Rubber Gloves

                          Mouth Shield for CPR

                          Space Blanket

                          Burn Ointment Jell (small and larger packs)

                          Bite Cream (small packs)

                          Sun Burn Ointment (small packs)

                          Plastic Electrical Tape (You would be surprised what you can do with it)

                          Aspirin

                          Tylenol

                          Safety Pins

                          Matches (waterproof survival type)

                          Flashlight (Pen Type)

                          Wound Wipes (small packs)

                          Smelling Salts

                          Wound Scrub Liquid

                          Small amount for 5 days of our prescription medicine in water tight container

                          Your kit will vary depending on the area you boat. If you are in remote areas you may want to have more in the case. We started with a Red Cross canvas First Aid kit, great for a boat application and then expanded on it.

                          We are assembling a ditch bag and intend to keep the first aid kit in the ditch bag. Our plan is pull the ditch bag out and place it near the salon door when underway. We will access the items in the first aid kit regularly and that is ok as it keeps the materials fresh. Which brings to mind that when you assemble a First Aid Kit, make sure you check it annually to ensure that the expiration dates are good and the condition of the the other supplies.

                          I also have taken first aid and CPR classes. Knowledge will be your best tool that you have. The other items makes the job easier.

                          If you do nothing else, at least read the first aid book. But I highly recommend that you take a class.
                          Patrick and Patti
                          4588 Pilothouse 1991
                          12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
                          M/V "Paloma"
                          MMSI # 338142921

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Mocoondo wrote:
                            I would be remiss in not pointing out that if you do choose to administer any sort of medical procedure, such as suturing a wound, you can and will be responsible should something happen as a result of your actions. Unless you have a "Dr." prefix attached to your name, you shouldn't be approaching anyone with a needle, stapler, or scalpel.
                            The above says it all. Let me do a bit of legal here. The good samaritan law, protects you if:

                            "You are acting as a normal person withing the scope of your training and ability".

                            For that reason, I carry a bunch of "butterfly" bandages which will close a wound well enough to get to medical assistance. My boating friend is a paramedic in Orange county (Orlando area) and he says he can not do sutures in other than his home county, legally. laws about doing medicine w/o a license are very severe even in Floriduh!

                            Look at the possible events you may encounter:

                            Possible but not limited to:

                            A fishhook inserted below the barb.

                            A sever cut where someone tried to clean a fish and missed

                            burn from trying to repair and engine or cooking

                            seasickness

                            insect or marine life bite (use your imagination

                            sunburn

                            upset stomach and/or indigestion

                            small cuts (bandaid and neosportin)

                            The above mentioned butterfly bandages.come in sizes. get the small and large.

                            broke bone from falling

                            object in eyes

                            Heart problems

                            Now, heres what I carry:

                            Asprins. 350 MG. if someone has a heart attack or stroke, put 4 under the tongue and call 911 mui pronto.

                            Elastic bandages. Useful for putting pressure on a wound.

                            2X2, 4X4 guause pads.

                            2" wide gause

                            medical tape (waterproof, of course)

                            hemostats (useful for extracting hooks and other foriegn bodies)

                            Exacto knife (don't ask)

                            Burn ointments

                            Aloe for sunburn

                            2 small bottles of whixkey for pain management

                            small bottle of disenfectant for cleaning wounds.

                            alka seltzer and pepto bismol.

                            Extra two day supply of meds for myself and the admiral

                            Manual rectal thermometer (heatstroke and other heat related injuries) Rectal is more accurate than oral. Hey the only difference is the taste (LOL). Recommended by a physican/

                            medical gloves

                            isopropanol alcohol

                            amonia (Jellyfish stings)

                            An medications peculiar to you and your family. example; sugar paste for a diabetic.

                            Phone numbers for your physicans.

                            Cold packs

                            1st aid manual written especially for on the water, and read the dam thing.

                            I have a small gym bag with contains all. Very conspicuously labelled "fisrt aid"

                            I actually used butterflys 2 years ago. A boat anchored near us, the woman missed a rung on a boarding ladder and ripped open a wound on her leg from the outboard motor. I used a pressure point and butterflys to close it, and called 911. Where we were 911, was 20 minutes away. We brough her to shore in my inflatable.

                            Again, do not do anything you are not eqipped and qualified for. You could be arrested, even if you save someone elses life, not to mention a lawsuit if you don't. I know how to do sutures, but because I don''t have CERTIFIED training, I don't carry any with me . Anything more serious, call the CG and advise of the situation. Then oif the situation goes from bad to worse, they can put someone on the radio who is a paramedic to guide you.
                            Captharv 2001 2452
                            "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

                            Comment


                              #15
                              captharv wrote:
                              The above says it all. Let me do a bit of legal here. The good samaritan law, protects you if:

                              "You are acting as a normal person withing the scope of your training and ability".

                              For that reason, I carry a bunch of "butterfly" bandages which will close a wound well enough to get to medical assistance. My boating friend is a paramedic in Orange county (Orlando area) and he says he can not do sutures in other than his home county, legally. laws about doing medicine w/o a license are very severe even in Floriduh!

                              Look at the possible events you may encounter:

                              Possible but not limited to:

                              A fishhook inserted below the barb.

                              A sever cut where someone tried to clean a fish and missed

                              burn from trying to repair and engine or cooking

                              seasickness

                              insect or marine life bite (use your imagination

                              sunburn

                              upset stomach and/or indigestion

                              small cuts (bandaid and neosportin)

                              The above mentioned butterfly bandages.come in sizes. get the small and large.

                              broke bone from falling

                              object in eyes

                              Heart problems

                              Now, heres what I carry:

                              Asprins. 350 MG. if someone has a heart attack or stroke, put 4 under the tongue and call 911 mui pronto.

                              Elastic bandages. Useful for putting pressure on a wound.

                              2X2, 4X4 guause pads.

                              2" wide gause

                              medical tape (waterproof, of course)

                              hemostats (useful for extracting hooks and other foriegn bodies)

                              Exacto knife (don't ask)

                              Burn ointments

                              Aloe for sunburn

                              2 small bottles of whixkey for pain management

                              small bottle of disenfectant for cleaning wounds.

                              alka seltzer and pepto bismol.

                              Extra two day supply of meds for myself and the admiral

                              Manual rectal thermometer (heatstroke and other heat related injuries) Rectal is more accurate than oral. Hey the only difference is the taste (LOL). Recommended by a physican/

                              medical gloves

                              isopropanol alcohol

                              amonia (Jellyfish stings)

                              An medications peculiar to you and your family. example; sugar paste for a diabetic.

                              Phone numbers for your physicans.

                              Cold packs

                              1st aid manual written especially for on the water, and read the dam thing.

                              I have a small gym bag with contains all. Very conspicuously labelled "fisrt aid"

                              I actually used butterflys 2 years ago. A boat anchored near us, the woman missed a rung on a boarding ladder and ripped open a wound on her leg from the outboard motor. I used a pressure point and butterflys to close it, and called 911. Where we were 911, was 20 minutes away. We brough her to shore in my inflatable.

                              Again, do not do anything you are not eqipped and qualified for. You could be arrested, even if you save someone elses life, not to mention a lawsuit if you don't. I know how to do sutures, but because I don''t have CERTIFIED training, I don't carry any with me . Anything more serious, call the CG and advise of the situation. Then oif the situation goes from bad to worse, they can put someone on the radio who is a paramedic to guide you.
                              Does not apply to Canada in the terms of being arrested. Yes you should only render assistance to the level and training you have recieved however their has never ever been a sucessful charge or suit against anyone who renders aid in Canada. In fact in the Province of Quebec it is a chargeable offence NOT to render aid to the level that you have been trained. IE. if you are a Paramedic, First Responder Nurse etc. and you drive past an accident without rendering assistance you can be charged.

                              So you should never be afraid to administer assistance in fear of a law suit in Canada. Just dont be conducting any appendectomys, Trachiotomies etc. Remember the first rule of Medicine "Do no harm"

                              Comment

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