Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Unexpected Patches Of Rough Water

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Unexpected Patches Of Rough Water

    This might fall into the category of "take a course" but I figured I'd start a discussion here.

    Monday, around noon, we were exiting Vancouver's False Creek. Forecast called for 0.2-0.3 metre waves, and sure enough everything seemed fine until we passed English Bay and found ourselves in a patch of MUCH rougher water. I can't be certain, but the waves probably ranged between 0.6 and 1 metre. Came as a bit of a shock.

    Then as we passed into shallower water off Point Grey (you could literally see the depth change by the color of the water) things calmed right down.

    The only damage was to one of our bed sheets when the cat threw up, but generally speaking I don't like surprises. I'm guessing what I experienced was a confluence of waves, winds, tides, and currents getting twisted up. How could I have better predicted something like that?
    "Mariposa"
    1989 3888 Motor Yacht
    Twin Ford 351 Engines, Sidepower Thrusters
    Rendova 11' Tender
    Richmond, BC

    #2
    Forecasting is really based on wind models, and from wind models you can derive wave height.

    This is big picture forecasting, and in reality you deal with micro environments where you get localized interaction between wind, current, etc...

    My opinion is that you will learn to recognize terrain features like river mouths, depth changes, and shoreline features that can and do affect the wave height you experience.

    My advice is to always prepare your boat for rough weather if you do not already do so, and to start thinking about the times that the waves varied in height, and apply that learning moving forward.

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 DOS PECES - SEWARD ALASKA - LA PAZ BCS MEXICO


    Whats the weather like on the boat
    https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


    Where am I right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/2R02

    Comment


      #3
      I’m of the opinion you came up on the effect of tidal action compounded by wind. The whole Salish Sea has local currents that aren’t limited to narrow passages. There’s an interesting Tides and Currents publication from Canadian Hydrographic that has charts of currents at various stages of the tide at Point Atkinson. It does take practice to use and I began playing with it on our trip in early July. I learned rather quickly that the stage of the tide didn’t always equate to current direction or speed. Some of it was downright counterintuitive.
      You probably also learned that as well as our 38’s ride, being ready for a rough patch is really a requirement. My uncle would announce the time to depart as “Rig for silent running!” The reference was to every WWII submarine movie as they were about to be attacked, but the message, often stated in jest, was to make sure things didn’t go flying or a have locker start ejecting it’s contents.
      I happy to hear the only casualty was a bedsheet, and that you are using the boat. Were you at False Creek for Fire over English Bay?
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      MMSI 367770440

      Comment


        #4
        I'll check into that Canadian Hydrographic thing. We were in False Creek for a combination of maintenance (anode change) and random vacationing. The fireworks would've been a nice bonus, but I didn't feel like weaving around party boats in the dark, and it turned out we couldn't see the show from a distance. Next year I'll fix the running lights on our tender and use that to take in the fireworks.
        "Mariposa"
        1989 3888 Motor Yacht
        Twin Ford 351 Engines, Sidepower Thrusters
        Rendova 11' Tender
        Richmond, BC

        Comment


        • Pcpete
          Pcpete commented
          Editing a comment
          It’s a really spectacular event.

        #5
        I use the current atlas, too. You use data from another yearly book, called Washburn Tables to select the chart for the hour of the day. The same data is available here: Current atlas tables by borsboom I have the PDF's downloaded on my phone.
        If you are making long crossings, like to Vancouver Island or Nanaimo, this thing can allow you to ride a 4 knot current, or buck one. Leaving even one hour later can save you two, and spare your wits and boat.
        As others have alluded to, where we are, you can have tide, river/outlet current, water depth and wind affecting your ride. The Fraser even affects us, to some extent. Put any one of those things against any one of the others and you will have waves. Put two against one and you might have big waves; think current and tide going out, and wind coming in=Rougher. If the stars align, and everything is going the same way and you might have a nicer ride.


        Click image for larger version

Name:	image.png
Views:	49
Size:	163.0 KB
ID:	652557Click image for larger version

Name:	image.png
Views:	51
Size:	296.9 KB
ID:	652558
        Tally and Vicki
        "Wickus" Meridian 341
        MMSI 338014939

        Comment


          #6
          This is available on android and apple. I don't have it.......YET!
          PNW Current Atlas on the App Store (apple.com)
          Tally and Vicki
          "Wickus" Meridian 341
          MMSI 338014939

          Comment


            #7
            Simple app, but it works as advertised. I'll try and make use of this info on future trips. Thanks.
            "Mariposa"
            1989 3888 Motor Yacht
            Twin Ford 351 Engines, Sidepower Thrusters
            Rendova 11' Tender
            Richmond, BC

            Comment


              #8
              As others said - I try to make sure that things are mostly situated for rough water when we leave the dock. Longer runs always, I will admit to not having everything put away for what should be short smooth runs. It has caught me from time to time but a few nick-nacks ending up sliding off a counter isn't a big deal. I would never make a run with my tender unsecured or something else big or valuable that might bust things up if it started moving around.

              Forecasts are just educated guesses and a lot of the time the real time data that is available is far enough away that by the time you made a decision on it .... it will be different when you get there. I have a few rules of thumb for locations I will run that make generally for a tolerable passage. Watching weather for a few days prior is also a good idea.
              1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
              1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
              Nobody gets out alive.

              Comment

              Working...
              X